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Tuesday, May 24, 2016

You shoot me in a dream, you better wake up an apologize

Contrary to popular conditioning, dreaming is not inferior to the sum of the moments of reality. And dreams shouldn’t be reduced to a mere parenthesis. 

Just because we’re unconscious doesn’t mean we can’t take that experience seriously. After all, we spend a third of our lives asleep. We we may as well discern what questions the dream is trying to answer. What our subconscious might be trying to tell us. 


And the good news us, we don’t have to take classes or go to therapy or earn a degree in clinical psychology. It’s simply a matter of intentionality and discipline. Because dreams always bring more questions than answers. In fact, we are often left with very real feelings that our dreams have aroused. 


Ever woke up in the middle of the night and felt the need to immediately apologize to your spouse for something you never even did? It happens to everyone. 


And so, it’s always a useful practice to name and explore those subconscious remains. I’ve been journaling my dreams for more than a decade, thanks to the recommendation from my therapist as a morning ritual for anxiety reduction. He encouraged me to spend time first thing each morning processing the night before. Not because it would give me a comprehensive understanding of dream interpretation and help unravel the unconscious symbols of my mind, but because it’s just another chance to talk to myself about my thoughts and feelings. 


It’s an ongoing conversation from which I draw conclusions that move me to take action while I’m awake. Perhaps the idea of following our dreams is more literal than we realize. 


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What might your subconscious be trying to tell you?
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Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Monday, May 23, 2016

The technology of making an effective request

Asking makes us vulnerable. It means people can hurt us by denying us the things we want. And nobody likes giving others that much power over them. 

That’s why we back down from the task. We’re afraid to ask clearly, creatively and repeatedly for what we want. Is it any wonder why we’re unhappy? 

The reality is, and this is going to sound so obvious it’s stupid, asking improves our chances of receiving. Always. Even if the answer is no. 

In fact, a clearly worded request still moves things forward, even when it’s rejected. The experience of asking adds energy to the system. It’s velocity. It keeps the story moving forward. And it positions us in a better context from which to raise future requests. 

When I first launched my business, I had no choice but to master the technology of making an effective request. Because it was just me. No money, no experience, no knowledge and no connections. 

And so, I constantly asked for support in many forms. I decided what I wanted, believed I was worthy of receiving it, trusted that I could get it, and persisted until people helped me or called security. 

A humbling reminder, that success never comes unassisted. That it’s okay to enlist support. That we’re playing a small game if we’re only making the requests we think will be accepted. And that asking for help didn’t make us greedy or incompetent or in the debt of the helper

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When will you let it be okay that you need other people?


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* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Sunday, May 22, 2016

Nobody can stop you from learning anything

Husserl was the grandfather of phenomenology, which is the philosophical study of the structures of experience and consciousness. 

He believed that experience was the source of all knowledge, famously saying that learning was not the accumulation of scraps of knowledge, but a growth where every act of knowledge develops the learner, this making him capable of constituting ever more and more complex objectives. 

Learning, then, was the activity of the whole being. An organic process. Not just finding out what other people already know. Not just slavish memorization of information. But real experiential education that calls for action and sensitivity and awareness and reflection. 

The good news is, all you have to do is ask questions and nobody can stop you from learning anything. Here’s one of my personal favorites. 

Am I learning enough through this experience to consider it part of my education? 

Unpaid internships are a perfect example. Business publications and employment organizations love to demonize them as unfair, immoral, discriminating and even illegal. And maybe they are. 

But whatever happened to apprenticeships? Whatever happened to journeymen? Have we become so entitled as a culture that we’ve lost touch with the humbling and satisfying challenge of working our way up the ranks? 

These are the types of priceless experiential opportunities that solidify our foundations and develop us as learners and allow us to grow smarter and stronger in the future.

Just because we’re not getting paid and getting benefits and getting a corner office, doesn’t mean we can’t grow from the experience. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Are you embracing an organic, long term learning process?

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For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Doing battle with the impossible

I’ll never forget reading the story about the middle eastern farmer who became rich and famous by selling sheep using the photo sharing app on his smartphone.

Impossible. 

Ali never could have dreamed of that level of economic prosperity twenty years ago. In fact, he probably comes from a long family lineage of sheep herders, most of whom wouldn’t even believe his story if he told them. 

The question is, how do people step into that kind of power? How is it that some farmer in the middle of nowhere can make the impossible happen? 

It starts with belief. Because if you think something hard is impossible, you’ll never even start trying to achieve it. And so, acquiring the capacity to make the impossible happen has less to do with authority, competence and influence, and more to do with initiative, commitment and resilience. 

Gross's research on personal reinvention coined a helpful phrase called the designated impossibility. It’s when you designate something as significant to yourself, recognizing that you cannot accomplish it with the power you currently have, and knowing that you must reinvent yourself or it will remain impossible. 

Ali didn’t change the world, he changed himself in relation to it. He reinvented the way he thought about business and farming and communicating and marketing. And that allowed him to do battle with the impossible. 

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What are you not committed to, only because you don’t believe it can be done?
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* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Friday, May 20, 2016

Stipend yourself according to your own standard of satisfaction

Here’s a question every entrepreneur must ask themselves. 

When will I have done enough to be happy with who I am? 

This thought haunted me for years. Because in a boundaryless system with no governor on my workload, no boss to answer to, and no separation between my personal and professional selves, I never put a proper limit on my work. I had zero sense of pace and proportion. I refused to stipend myself according to my own standard of satisfaction. 

And as a result, I gave in to the temptation to maximize income by working around the clock. Landing me in the hospital multiple times for stress related illnesses. 

If only I had understood the principle of elegant sufficiency. The ability to reach your personal level of enough. To recognize when more of something no longer means personal growth. To have done enough to be happy with who you are. 

I recall a fascinating article about a software company that has a strict anti workaholic policy. The founders literally punish staff members for not taking breaks. Employees are required to leave at five, putting in no more than forty hours a week. 

What’s interesting is, this isn’t a time management issue, it’s an existential issue. Developing a refined and selective sense of appropriateness under the circumstances is basic upkeep for the soul. It forces you to put yourself at the top of your own list. To remind yourself that who you already are is enough to get what you want. 

Once you arrive at that place of enoughness, there will be a part of you that’s finally resting. And from there, anything is possible. 

Remember, the pile never gets to zero. The list of stuff to do, things to learn and people to contact will continue to refill itself in perpetuity. There’s nothing you can do to stop it. No matter how many times you save the world, it always manages to get back in jeopardy again. 

And so, learn to stipend yourself according to your own standard of satisfaction. Figure out your definition of elegant sufficiency. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
When will you have done enough to be happy with who you are?
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* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Thursday, May 19, 2016

Rescue us from the limitations of logic

Alder first hypothesized that the personality was the same in dreaming life as in waking life. And that the only difference was, in dreams, the pressure of social demands was less acute and the personality was revealed with fewer safeguards and concealments. 

Out in the world, though, we’re forced to put logical chains on our whimsical appetites. We face a level of accountability and rationality and practicality that’s sufficiently intense to beat our dreams out of us. 

And so, we shrink. We play small. We reluctantly accept the idea that it was irresponsible to pursue our dreams in the first place. And we stand idly by as logos wins the day. Tragic

Linklater’s inspiring film makes a powerful point on this very issue. The character reminisces about having job that he hated and worked real hard at. And after a long, hard day of work, when he finally got to go home, get in bed and close his eyes, he immediately wakes up and realizes that the whole day at work had been a dream. Reminding the viewer that it’s bad enough that you sell your waking life for minimum wage, but now they get your dreams for free. 

The trick, he says, is to combine your waking rational abilities with the infinite possibilities of your dreams. Because if you can do that, you can do anything. 

That’s the thing about dreams. We can’t apply logic because the world of inspiration doesn’t follow that dynamic. And so, we practice lowering the volume of our logical brains. We put whimsy on wheels. And we take action upon our intuitive leads. Even though we’re afraid to use our intuition because we’ll have to defend it and have no logical explanation to support our actions. 

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Why is it rational or logical that anybody should be expected to be afraid of the dream they've been put on this earth to fulfill?

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For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Moments of Conception 205: The Rayon Scene from Dallas Buyers Club

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.


Based on my books in The Prolific Series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.


Today's clip comes from the hospital scene in Dallas Buyers Club:



Learn to let the world in.
Woodroof is initially hostile towards the terminally ill transvestite. But in this moment, it occurs to him that he might be able to help an entirely new population of patients by creating an alliance. Rayon, he realizes, is the linchpin that can open up an entirely new marketplace of customers who need his help. Reluctantly, he partners up and with the streetwalker and forms a profitable membership club that they operate out of a motel room. But over time, not only doe they begin to turn a profit, they also begin to respect each other. Despite being shunned and ostracized by many of his old friends, Ron treats Rayon as a friend, confidant and colleague. The two rebels, unwilling to wait for the government’s medical establishment to save them, don’t wait for permission, they just hire themselves and get to work. It’s a beautiful lesson in learning to let the world in. Even if that means supporting the very people that you once despised. This movie is a gritty example of pure enterprise. A story about two people whose immune systems are failing, but whose opportunity agendas are thriving. And let us not forget the story behind the story, the one about two artists whose careers were resurrected by their embrace of their difficult choices. Both actors transformed their bodies to play their respective characters, both demonstrated magical cinematic prowess in their performances, and both were bestowed with the highest awards actors can receive. What do you see when you see people?


Everything you do should lead to something else you do. This movie is about an entrepreneur who diversifies and expands his offerings. Business schools should show it in their marketing classes. Because it teaches us to constantly reexamine the smallest revenue centers of our enterprise. To pose the crucial leverage question, now that I have this, what else does this make possible? Years ago when people started asking to work with me one on one, I created a service called Rent Scott’s Brain. The program was unsystematic and unpolished, but it still created value for people. And it became a solid revenue stream for my company, despite its imperfections. Awesome. What’s interesting is, after several dozen coaching engagements over the years, I started to experience dimensional shifts as a service provider, as we all do. Since there were personal skills and wisdom I wasn’t tapping into to create value and build my business, I decided to diversify. To expand on my current offering with better and more sophisticated variation of my one on one service. Now the program is much more comprehensive. A unique combination of coaching, mentoring, consulting and strategizing. That’s what’s possible when we put our diversification caps on. With some reinvention, each of our revenue centers can become a entirely new business unit. Each of our offerings can give our artistic voice another outlet and therefore activate a new market segment. And each of our services can become another option for our clients to become involved with us in an inexpensive and accessible way. That’s how businesses evolve. We build organically, but we leverage strategically. What could we do today that would be a complete step forward in your brand’s evolution?

Turn your creativity loose. For the true artist, there is no vacation. If their eyes are open, they’re working. Always scanning the horizon, always panning for gold, and always ready to build a home for the next great idea that appears somewhere in the world. But they also understand that observation alone can’t always single handedly operate the machinery of creativity. And so, they reserve a portion of their minds for inspiring themselves. They build an environment around themselves that allows their creativity to erupt. Joni Mitchell comes to mind. What I loved about her was, she invented everything about her music. From performance style to lyrics to genre to guitar tunings to chord progressions, there wasn’t an element of her art that wasn’t original. That’s why she became her own adjective. And so, if we want to follow her lead and turn our own creativity loose, we ought to think about building a system of our own. Making things that help us make things. This past year, I spent six months developing a framework for being prolific. It’s an entire curriculum. A master class on creativity. A robust intellectual property development system that demystifies my own creative process. Interestingly, since I started to put more rigor around my own systems, it has released new levels of output and expression in my work. Funny what happens when we embrace the privilege of having ourselves as a client. Where will your creativity find access to you?

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What did you learn from this movie clip?

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Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Turning base metal into gold

The industrial education complex isn’t interested in students whose talents don’t fit into what the examination systems require. Because it’s a giant factory. And if a student’s gifts don’t conform to the dictates of whatever core curriculum is in place, they’re kicked to the curb. 

Thiel’s book on startups summarizes it perfectly:

If we overachieve and end up learning something that’s not on the test, we won’t receive credit for it. But if we sit in a row and follow the rules and memorize facts and do exactly what’s asked of us, but a bit better than our peers, we’ll get an a

What a dangerous and disgusting way to condition people to enter the real world. And so, our mission is to engage in alchemy. To do work that can’t be categorized and cauterized. To turn base metal into gold, so to speak, creating something special and significant out of nothing, using only our imagination. 

Because despite our society’s deeply embedded factory mindset, we really do exist in a culture that encourages and attracts alchemy. It’s just not advertised. You have to dive into the nooks and crannies to find the entry points. 

But look around. Everyone who is making real progress in today’s economy isn’t doing something with a certified skill. Rogers actually predicated this more than thirty years ago. In his definitive treatise on human potential, he said we must face the fact that in dealing with human beings, a certificate does not give much assurance of real qualification. In every area, medicine, nursing, teaching, bricklaying and carpentry, certification has tended to freeze and narrow the profession, has tied it to the past and discouraged innovation. If we were less arrogant, he said, we might also learn much from the uncertified individual, who is sometimes unusually adept elsewhere. 

Further proof, that those working without a map, those willing to create something out of nothing, and those prepared to bring life to what might be, are the real a students.

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What valuable skills do you have that can’t be certified by a governing body?

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* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!