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Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Art is more of a gamble than a guarantee

Regardless of talent and hard work and passion and commitment, money and success and impact and adulation may or may not ever come your way. Those forces are simply not within a creator’s control. 

And so, you must learn to accept getting paid in the pride from having lived up to your expectations for yourself. You must accept with gratitude and celebration the psychological salary of honor and satisfaction and integrity. It’s not a currency you can pay the mortgage with, but it is a renewable form of meaning that can fuel you to keep production going. 

And who knows? Perhaps after a period of years, your work will finally be met with financial remuneration and public recognition. 

On the other hand, you could kill yourself and get nowhere. You could work for a decade still and never see a dime or get a standing ovation. 

The point is, there are no guarantees in art, except for the satisfaction you experience in the process of creating it. But if you don’t get to a point where that’s enough for you, you’ll be in for a world of pain and disappointment and disillusionment. 

So be selfish. Create for yourself. Because you can’t guarantee that anyone else will give a shit. 

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What are you losing by hanging your sense of success on paper, ink and dead presidents

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For a copy of the list called, "8 Ways to Out Give Your Competition," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Use the entirety of your inner life to serve your dreams

Jung was a proponent of taking the inner life seriously. 

He famously said that he always tried to make room for anything that wanted to come from within. In fact, that insight led him to rename and generalize what became known as the ego and the self, which became central to his theory of personality development. 

Similarly, our dreams require a uniting of our inner elements. Even the parts that scare us. Because if we are to make our dreams a reality, we have an obligation to use all the means at our disposal. To open the door to all of our feelings, moods, limitations, contradictions, pathologies, intuitions and fantasies. 

Historically, I’ve always had a highly active inner life. An imagination that charged and chumbled and churned. Even when I five years old, there seemed to be storm of thoughts forever blowing through my head. 

But thanks to the help of my teachers and parents and relatives and mentors, I began to learn how to channel those storms, converting rain into drinkable water, lightning into usable electricity, thunder into storable energy and wind into forward motion, so to speak. 

Thirty years later, the storm still rolls on, but now I have a high performance power plant inside of me that uses the entirety of my inner life to serve my dreams. 

I’m reminded of an interview I heard with a famous poker player, who explained that we all walk around with an incredible tool kit, building and building upon it, trusting that it will eventually be recognized and put to use. But the trick is, he said, instead of letting the tools rust, we keep employing them any way that we can until our dreams come true. 

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Are you making room for anything that wants to come through you?

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For a copy of the list called, "7 Ways to Out Experience the Competition," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Monday, May 25, 2015

Moments of Conception: The Voice Scene from In A World

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.


And so, in this blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.


Today's clip comes from the voice scene in In A World:




Bring all of yourself to everything you do. All I ever wanted was to find my thing. My trademark. The one activity that would define my time on this earth. And so, I spent young adult life running scared through a maze of false starts, failed identity experiments and oddball pursuits, reaching for anything that would fit, turning what I found into what I wanted. Until I had an epiphany. It’s not about activity, it’s about identity. It’s not about hammering one nail all your life, it’s about hammering lots of nails, one way, all your life. So instead of trying set up something I was going to do, I started cultivating and fulfilling someone I already was. That became my thing. My purpose. My trademark. And making peace with that changed everything for me. My attitude, my posture, my relationship to the world, I felt whole and complete and together. More like a new man, and yet, more like myself than ever. If you’re on a similar journey, struggling to find your thing, here’s the surprise. You are the thing. You are exactly what you’ve been looking for. Meaning is made, not found. No need to reach for something that’s already inside yourself. It’s right there waiting for you. You just have to own it. What vital clues to your identity are you still missing?

You can go back to liking me now that I’m a failure again. Chris Rock famously said that some people have jobs, and some people have careers. And the people with careers need to learn to shut the hell up when they’re around people with jobs. Because they don’t want to hear your career bullshit. Your happiness makes them sad. Funny how ambition grosses people out. How success pisses people off. Because you assume everybody will be happy for you. But the reality is, a certain population of the world is just waiting around, excitedly, for you to fail. And until you do, they will always feel disenfranchised by your success. In fact, there’s a fascinating study from the Journal of Applied Psychology about the causes and consequences of ambition. According to the researchers, more ambitious people appeared to be happier, but their happiness came at the expense of social bonds. Ambition may drive people forward, but it also holds their relationships back. That’s the cost of success. Which doesn’t suggest we should lower our ambitions, but perhaps raise our empathy. Practice a little emotional intelligence in the presence of people who haven’t achieved our same level of success. We have to remind ourselves that we live in a world with other people, most of whom don’t love their jobs and don’t follow their passion and can’t afford to become who they really are. And every time we brag about our eight second commute or lack of coworkers or the fact that we don’t have to wear pants to work if we don’t want to do, makes us look like insensitive pricks. Does your success make you inconsiderate of other people’s life situation?

Learn how to compress yourself. The advantage of living in vibrant, bustling city is, you can instantly plug yourself into the creative undercurrent. Commune with the sensibility of culture that’s in the air. And it’s an endless supply that’s completely free of charge, and the only condition is, you have to pay it back with your originality. That’s the social contract. You’re obligated to contribute to the intellectual and artistic commons of the community as long as you’re there. Anything less is an act of ingratitude. But the good news is, your work doesn’t have to be good, it just has to be yours. Ownership is more important than quality. Quality is an objective measure. It’s a judgment of the matching of expectations with experience. Ownership, on the other hand, is completely subjective. It’s something nobody can take away or criticize. Because it belongs to you. This movie was an inspiration to me because of its originality. Lake Bell didn’t just star in a another movie, she created a unique vehicle for her writing, acting, producing and directing skills that put her full range of abilities on display. She compressed herself. She concentrated her portfolio of talents into a tight little package that demonstrated the full firepower of her creative arsenal. What talents do you have that few, if any, see?

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What did you learn from this movie clip?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Sunday, May 24, 2015

Dip your toes in committed waters

I have a chef friend who dreamed of starting her own restaurant, but couldn’t afford the overhead of doing so year around. 

And so, instead of going broke going the whole hog, she started small. First, she began selling her dishes at the local food events and farmers markets. Once she attracted enough attention, earned enough money and gained enough confidence, she opened up a seasonal pop up shop in a space normally occupied by an ice cream shop during warmer weather. 

Customers loved it. Momentum started building. The brand gained traction. But that’s when my friend decided to leave people wanting more. She closed the shop during the summer to retool the menu, then reopened the following year for season number two. And customers couldn’t wait to come back. 

The question, then, is what’s next for her? Will she stay open year round? Expand to multiple locations? Launch a line of retail products? Start a food truck? 

She doesn’t know. Because that’s not how experiments work. The point is, she didn’t want to risk breaking the bank and breaking her back going all the way right away, so she lowered the threat level and took a calculated risk. She dipped her toes in committed waters. She bravely exposed her dream to the harsh, raw light of the real world. Even if only for a few months out of the year. 

And now, whenever the time comes for her to up the ante on her commitment, she’ll be ready to pull the trigger. 

That’s the beauty of baby steps. They allow our more mature expressions to come into being. 


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What risky but reasonable action you could take to increase your level of commitment?

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For a copy of the list called, "11 Ways to Out Market Your Competitors," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Saturday, May 23, 2015

There’s no such thing as creating too much

Patterson has three hundred million copies of his books in print worldwide. He’s the planet’s bestselling author since the turn of the century. Last year, one out of every twenty six books sold had his name on it. 

This man is my hero. 

James is all about volume. Multiple projects at once. Multiple titles every year. Multiple landscapes to harvest his brilliance. And despite what the critics say about his craft, despite jealous authors calling him a paint by number book factory, this writer is going to keep cranking out books until he croaks. 

Actually, I take that back. James will probably publish more titles post mortem than most authors do in the lifetimes. 

The point is, people’s opinions about our output shouldn’t concern us. Eventually, every creator has to reach a point where they no longer need other people to support the decisions they’ve made about their artistic reality. 

I learned this early on as a songwriter, considering my debut record was a double album. How’s that for being prolific? And yet, despite the cynical looks people gave me, despite people’s suspicions and judgments about some nineteen year old kid whose first album had twenty songs on it, I just kept creating. 

Call it audacious, call it presumptuous, call it grandiose, but that’s what who I am. Making things is my thing and there’s nothing anybody can do to stop me. 

Years later when I started writing books, a major publisher contacted me about working together. The only problem was, their author contract would have limited me to only releasing one book every two years. No thanks. I have too much to say. 

One of my songwriting heroes made a beautiful point about this very issue. Adams eloquently asked the interviewer, why are people curating other people? So many people are so lazy, timid and fearful of actually ensconcing themselves in their chosen craft, of making that simple decision to have faith in their ideas on what they were spiritually inclined to do what makes them happy. 

Amen. There’s no such thing as creating too much. 

If volume is vanity, than hand me a mirror and call me the evil queen. 

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What did you write today?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Friday, May 22, 2015

Scott Ginsberg, "The Nametag Guy," Keynote Speaker @ AgentCon15 w/Insurance Technologies Corporation

This is a clip from my keynote presentation at ITC's AgentCon15 in Dallas.

This particular module is about the value of invisible labor. 

Making sure your clients know how hard you're working for them.









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What's your invisible labor?


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For a copy of the list called, "11 Things to Stop Wasting Your Time On," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!