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Thursday, August 25, 2016

The unedited life is the one worth living

The more we expect from technology, the less we expect on each other. The further we disappear down the digital rabbit hole, the more we lose touch with what is essential about being a person. 

And so, each of us needs to make a special effort to deepen our direct participation with the world. To get out from behind the screen and engage in real interactions with real people in real time with real consequences. 

That’s one of the reasons I started busking in the park. Because singing songs alone in my room, while safe and controlled and predictable, was ultimately an antisocial experience. 

I didn’t need more me. I needed to break my isolation, get out of my head and get into the world. 

And so, when I began performing in public, it breathed new life into my music through the power of touch, vulnerability, disclosure, surprise and raw feeling. 

It challenged me to make and hold eye contact with complete strangers, which stimulated the release of the hormone oxytocin, which made me feel more connected and social and happy. 

It challenged me to read people’s movements and respond accordingly, which created unedited, unplanned interactions, which made me feel more human. 

The experience was so magical, I made a documentary about it. 

The point is, computers can’t do that. Digital interactions tend to make a person feel objectified and quickly discarded, reduced to emotional shorthand. They convert someone into a matrix of preferences that supposedly represents their essence as a human being. 

And despite its amazing power to educate and connect and empower, often times, it just feels like an unpleasant necessity that does not feed the human spirit. 

We mustn’t allow ourselves to become immune to ordinary human connection. 

We must make a special effort to deepen our direct participation with the world. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
When was the last time you engaged with real people in real time with real consequences?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...

For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Prosecute myself for crimes past

When I think back to all the nonsense I spent so long giving a shit about, all the redundant and petty ego vortexes that frittered away my time and money and energy, it’s hard not to become frustrated. 

It’s hard not to prosecute myself for crimes past. 

I recently stumbled across an invoice from a decade ago. It was the bill from my web development company, who charged me fifteen thousand dollars to design my new website. Which, at the time, was cheap. And the product came out beautifully. 

Smash cut to ten years later, and I’m rebuilding that same website for a fourth of the cost, and the quality is ten times better. It’s astounding. 

But instead of celebrating this amazing new technology and dreaming about what it will make possible for my business, I’m still kicking myself for a check I wrote ten years ago. 

Thankfully, my web developer calmed me down. She reminded me that every one of her clients says the same thing. Every one. 

And so, it’s a complete waste of time throw our line over the wall of the past and see what we can catch. It’s not worth the beating. 

Regret is just a punishment we administer to ourselves

Truth is, we are who we decide to move forward as, not what we have done in the past. And if we are to think clearly about the future, we need to clean up the language we use in labeling our behaviors in the past. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
Are you prepared to let the past die and let the future take care of itself?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...

For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Forging new frontiers of originality

Saying no is the fundamental way we have of differentiating ourselves. 

We are defined by what we decline. 

And so, I work very hard at saying, let somebody else play that game. It’s a crucial part of my originality filter. Rejecting the low hanging fruit opportunities so that I can gravitate toward projects and activities where the amount of craft I have to bring is higher. 

Where I can engage all of my gifts in a meaningful way. 

Where there’s fresh powder, so to speak.

I once entertained the idea of converting my intellectual property into a ten week college course. Both for the continuing education department at major university, and also for a popular online community. 

And so, I spent several months with my nose to the grindstone, learning about instructional design and fleshing out the curriculum. 

Until one afternoon during a walk in the park, it hit me. 

I’m not a teacher. I don’t want to be a teacher. In fact, I would made a horrible teacher. Because teaching involves giving assignments and having patience and holding people’s hands and managing details and thinking linearly and setting milestones and keeping the peace. That sounds awful. At least, for someone with my personality and skillset. 

But that was an important realization to have. Because once I learned that I wasn’t interested in enduring the sacrifice, risk and adventure that committing to being a teacher entailed, I was free to say, let somebody else play that game. 

So I did. I abandoned the education venture. And in its place, I initiated an exciting new project that forged the frontiers of my originality. The concert documentary integrated all of my talents, from songwriting to musical performing to mass communicating to public speaking to marketing strategy, all in one. Something teaching a class could never do for me. 

Lesson learned, instead of executing another me too product, place yourself in a market niche where your existing assets shine brighter than the competition. Ask yourself:

Will this create the feeling of a new sense of energy flowing through me? Will this enable the soul to find greater expression? And will this result in the human spirit revealing itself more definitely? 

If so, go get that fresh powder. 

Because the reward is, you get to feel like you’re creating in a risky way. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
Are you competing in events where you can win the gold?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Monday, August 22, 2016

The lights are low, come see these gifts I’ve made for you

Carlin was frequently asked by journalists if his comedy was meant to get people thinking. 

But being the intellectual and artist and performer that he was, he said that what he wanted people to know was that he was thinking. To show off that he had brought himself to a cleverer, smarter spot than they had. 

As if to say, can’t you see this? Can’t you see? 

That’s why people loved him. He had an exquisite sense of hierarchy. He was a man who understood his artistic priorities. Job number one wasn’t to educate and teach and mentor and inspire everyone around him, but to enjoy a complete, thoughtful and joyful life that allowed him to serve as an exemplar for those around him.

And so, not only did his comedy deserve an audience, but his life model deserved a following. Very few modern artists can say the same. 

George’s life reminds us that we are the model for what we create. And when we work from embodiment, when we remember that we are the stuff art is made of, there’s no stopping us. 

The lights are low, come see these gifts I’ve made for you. 

Because every audience loves to see their performer’s wheels turning. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
Does your life model deserve a following?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Desperately trying to protect the narrative

There’s part of us that believes the very act of trying will contaminate the result. 

That the harder we chase after what we want, the more it will deny and elude us. And so, we just sit back and relax and allow it to be organic and land softly on our shoulder. 


But in many cases, that’s just cop out. A cozy little story we enjoy telling ourselves because it removes all the responsibility from our back. 


It’s like the chronically blocked artist. After a certain period of time, he grows to enjoy being a unsuccessful creator. Because being blocked has become part of his identity. It’s the story he gets to carry around with himself, and it’s bulletproof. 


But here’s the reality check. No matter how hard we try not to try, sitting around twiddling our thumbs, waiting for the universe to deliver our dreams to us is not an effective strategy. We have to be proactive and hungry and intentional and disciplined. There has to be a sense of agency and urgency burning inside of us. And there has to be a buttress of action underneath our dreams. 


Otherwise we’ll be stuck in limbo for a very long time. 


I once interviewed with a consulting firm who claimed they badly needed to develop more rigor around their company’s intellectual property and knowledge management, creating infrastructure and machinery to kick out thought leadership content on a consistent basis. 


As luck would have it, I literally wrote the book on how to become prolific. 


And so, I pitched them a proven intellectual property development system. And they balked. As soon as I presented a viable solution to their problem, they suddenly had a change and heart and decided it wasn’t that big of a problem after all. 


Funny how that works. The moment you give somebody the keys to the kingdom, they drop them. Perhaps it’s because they don’t want to give up that story they’ve been carrying around all this time. 


It’s like insulation to them. It’s just easier to not try. 



LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
Are you waiting for your dreams to come true, or is it the other way around?LET ME SUGGEST THIS...For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Saturday, August 20, 2016

What to eliminate versus what to create

We all have the same dream. 

To be engaged in activities we would rather continue than stop. To spend little time spent in situations we would wish to escape. To be in a position to organize our life around our highest aspirations and deepest values. 

And yet, most of our goals toward that dream fail because of a misappropriation of energy. 

Instead of focusing our efforts on creating what we want, we devote ourselves to eliminating what we don’t want. And that’s when our subconscious mind locks in. 

We start demonizing it and giving it energy and create any unnecessary psychological fuel around it, and before we know it, that thing that we don’t want so badly, suddenly has a power source. 

Parents of young children deal with this on a daily basis. When their kids are still developing the ability to manager their emotions, they learn to cope with strong feelings by looking to the parents for help. 

And so, when the toddler trips and falls in the middle of the sidewalk, the mother doesn’t shriek and run over to the child and pick him up and start comforting and soothing him. Because kids are hypersensitive to parental energy. That would only exacerbate the situation.

Instead, the parent refuses to give the fall any power. She remains calm, tells the kid they’re fine, celebrates the accomplishment of getting back up, and continues walking. 

She focuses on what she wants to create, not what she wants to eliminate. Which puts her in the position of cause, not effect. 

The same goes for each of us. Our orientation towards our goals must remain positive. 

Because the only thing worse than not taking action on our dreams, is giving energy to our nightmares. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
Instead of grumbling about something that bothers us, we building something more powerful that takes the place of your old life?
LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Friday, August 19, 2016

Sufficient structure to contain the complexity

Most creative projects are only complex logistically, not spiritually. 

Yes, there are countless details and documents and calendars and tasks and challenges and expectations to manage. And that’s no easy task. 

But the good news is, if you’re crystal clear on who you are and what you want, and if you’re willing to trust smart people to show up and support your vision with their brilliance, that will be sufficient structure to contain the complexity. 

In the last few years, I’ve written, produced and scored three full length music films. The first movie was a concert documentary about identity and belonging, the second was a motivational masterclass on following your dreams, and the third was an animated folk rock opera. 

Sound like substantial undertakings? They were. Filmmaking has been the single most expensive, laborious, time consuming and exhausting endeavor I’ve ever undertaken. Doing so has made me feel engaged, tested and stretched in every possible way. 

But to my surprise and delight, it’s not complex. It isn’t overwhelming. 

Because we intentionally created very little friction in the process. 

I remember editing one afternoon with my director, and I asked him how on earth we were able to execute so quickly. His response was priceless. 

Because we don’t have a deadline, and there’s nobody yelling at us. 

And so, if you’re on the edge of a fiery new creative pursuit, excited to turn your brain over to some magnificent obsession, begin by building sufficient structure to complain the complexity. Be clear on who you are, what you want, and whom to trust. 

And instead of introducing complexity for no reason, reducing friction at every opportunity.

You’ll cross the finish line before you know it.

LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
Do you harbor contempt for simplicity because you believe only complexity is worthy of your attention? 
LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!


* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Feeling farther away from my goal than when I started

Keep moving the story forward. 

That’s the mantra for taking action, making progress and building momentum. I even wrote a book about it here.

But the question is, what happens when we inadvertently move in the wrong direction? How do we reconcile the mistakes and missteps and setbacks that take us away from our goal? 

I once spent an entire summer applying for more than twelve hundred jobs. I filled out applications and submitted portfolios and took assessments and did video conferences and went on interviews, and every single one of them rejected me.

But what bothered me most about the experience wasn’t feeling unwanted, but feeling farther away from my goal than when I started. That was even worse. It’s like I spent four months building negative momentum in my career. 

Until a professor friend of mine reminded me about how physics works. 

Newton’s first law. A body in motion stays in motion. A body at rest stays at rest. Therefore, action, even if you are going in the wrong direction, can still create momentum. Because you’re already in motion. And that means you can more easily change direction than if you are standing still. 

Proving, that even the actions that aren’t leading you directly to your goals will still generate energy. Taking action of any kind will make you feel better about yourself and our prospects. It doesn’t have to be heroics, rather, small practical things that come together to achieve effectiveness. 

And that energy will allow you to keep moving the story forward. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
When was a time you felt that your actions spoke for the best in who you are? 
LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!


* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!