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Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Build something that nobody can take away from you

The reward of the journey is not arriving at the destination, it’s transforming yourself to such a state of joy and worthiness and fulfillment, that you don’t feel any different when you get there. 

Because you’ve already done the work. You’ve already supported yourself in becoming the person you most needed to be. The destination was just a bonus. The cherry on top. 

Job seekers, for example, assume that once they finally land their new gig, intense feelings of relief and lightness and satisfaction will surge through their system as they start the first day of the rest of their lives. 

Cue the lights. Start the dramatic music. Zoom in on the character’s face. And let the audience know that this new job symbolizes our hero’s highest moment of achievement. 

This is it. This is the one. This what he’s been waiting for. This new job is going to change everything forever. Freeeeedommmmm! 

It reads nice on a screenplay. Unfortunately, if that scene happens in real life, the character hasn’t learned a damn thing. He hasn’t grown, he’s just wearing a new suit. 

His joy is at the mercy of external forces. It comes from without, not within. 

Which means it can be taken away at any moment. And the minute it does, he’s back to where he started. 

On the other hand, if job seekers can approach the process knowing that their new position isn’t going to save them, set them free, make them whole or make them complete, they will have already won by the time they arrived. 

Because they will have built something inside of themselves that nobody can take away from them. 

The love they can never lose

And of course, they allow themselves to celebrate and pump their fists and express gratitude and share the good news with people they love. 

But the real victory is within. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...

How could you make the journey so valuable that the destination doesn’t even matter?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

Buy my latest devotional! 

A Year in Hot Yoga: 365 Daily Meditations for On and Off the Mat


Now available wherever books are sold.


Namaste.

Monday, February 19, 2018

Episode 102: Single Saskatchewan Kissers || Andy, Phil, Sherril

What if grandparents babysat in parking lots? 

What if doing house chores was a competitive sport? 

What if ping pong had ball boys? 

What if we monetized road rage? 

What if parents could shop in big box retailers without stress?

In this episode of Steal Scott's Ideas, Andy, Phil and Sherril gather in Tampa for some execution in public.

# # #
Execution Lesson 102: Air as dense as a poor man’s sandwich.
Recently, a footwear company launched an innovative pair of sneakers that were fashioned mostly out of recycled carbon dioxide emissions.

Sound unfathomable? Well, carbon dioxide emitted by power plants can be actually be captured and converted into a special polymer useful for creating shoes. You can literally make the product out of thin air.

This is, in my opinion, the one and only instance where the phrase out of thin air is valid.
Those three words make my blood boil. When somebody comments that an idea comes out of thin air, what they mean is, it’s so unexpected, it seems to have materialized suddenly and dramatically.

But that’s not the way innovation works. Thin air exists on mountaintops, but within the infinite realm of human consciousness and imagination, it’s exactly the opposite. The more interesting, surprising and memorable an idea is, the more likely it is to have come from air that is very, very thick.

This is how the creative brain functions. Nothing is ever wasted. We train ourselves to file everything away. Our subconscious impressions combine with our conscious experiences, efforts and realizations, and the relaxed free association between the two promotes the flow of air makes ideas happen.

Emerson spoke of this process movingly.

A man is to know that they are all his, suing his notice, petitioners to his faculties that they will come out and take possession, born thralls to his sovereignty, conundrums he alone can guess, chaos until he comes like a creator and gives them light and order.

If your job is make into existence things that didn’t exist before, to bring forth the future from nothing, then make the air as thick as you possibly can.

Pay attention to your impressions. Keep a watchful eye on them. Assure everything you know is written down somewhere.

And in time, your reservoir of related associations and impressions will be money in the bank of your creative consciousness.
LET ME ASK YA THIS...How will you breathe a new world into existence when your air is as dense as a poor man’s sandwich?
* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

Buy my latest devotional! 

A Year in Hot Yoga: 365 Daily Meditations for On and Off the Mat


Now available wherever books are sold.


Namaste.

Wake up and receive the love that’s waiting

Saturday morning, a man receives a knock at this door. 

He answers and sees a jehovah’s witness smiling and holding a bible. 

"Hello, sir, do you mind if I come inside to talk for a bit?" 

To his surprise, the homeowner says yes and invites him in. A few minutes later, the man comes into the living room with some coffee and a bagel, sits down on the couch and says: 

"So, what did you want to talk to me about?"

And the jehovah’s witness responds:

"I don’t know, I never made it this far."

The reason I love this joke so much is, it’s not about religion, it’s about rejection. It’s about how we can become so habituated to hearing no, that we don’t even know how to react to a yes. 

Because we’ve forgotten what it feels like to be accepted. It’s a foreign concept. 

And so, when it actually happens, we’re paralyzed with disbelief. 

Excuse me, but I must have misheard. I could have sworn you just said yes to me. 

It’s like when you’re a kid and you start repeating the same word over and over until it turns into gibberish. 

Thurber first pointed this out in his autobiography

I began to indulge in the wildest fancies as I lay there in the dark, such as that there was no such town, and even that there was no such state. I fell to repeating the word new jersey over and over again, until it became idiotic and meaningless. 

If you have ever lain awake at night and repeated one word over and over, thousands and millions and hundreds of thousands of millions of times, you know the disturbing mental state you can get into. 

There’s actually a scientific term for this moment. Semantic saturation is a psychological phenomenon in which repetition causes a word or phrase to temporarily lose meaning for the listener, who then perceives the speech as repeated meaningless sounds. 

Rejection works the same way. The avalanche of no scrambles our brain. 

And so, when we finally realize, wait a minute, these people aren’t just being nice, they actually like and trust and believe in me, we almost have to pinch ourselves to wake up and receive the love that’s waiting for us. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...   
What word have you insulated your heart against hearing?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


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Together we can solve real problems, brainstorm ridiculous inventions and build robust marketing strategies to help those ideas improve the world.

Sunday, February 18, 2018

They took the fork right out of my plastic

Belonging is the opposite of thinking that wherever you are, you would be better off somewhere else. 

And if you’re lucky enough to experience it, it’s one of the most joyous and liberating feeling in the repertoire of human emotion. 

Take it from somebody who struggled with belonging his whole life. 

Somebody who always felt like an alien staring into the window of the party. Somebody who wondered if there were any people in the world like him. 

In fact, every time I tried to join a new community of people, there was always a restless moment where I would be just waiting for somebody to ask me why I was acting weird. 

Until one day, there wasn’t. Nobody seemed to take issue with my little quirks. Because I finally found places that embraced the weirdness I had to offer. And I suddenly realized:

Oh wow, these people actually see me. Pinch me, slap me and throw cold water on my face. This is home. 

When you have felt so alone for so long, that sense of belonging feels like a warm hug. 

Brogan said it best in book about the geeks inheriting the earth:

Fitting in often means shaving off your unique edges, hiding and masking what defines you, discarding any behaviors or appearances or images that prompt others to question you or push away from you. Belonging, though, is about finding that place where you finally let out a deep breath you had no idea you were holding and feeling with great certainty that the people around you understand you. 

Proving, that home isn’t where we live, it’s where we’re understood. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...   
How did you find the community that took the fork right out of your plastic?

* * * *


Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Listen to the world's only product development and innovation gameshow!

Subscribe today. Join out community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs.  


Together we can solve real problems, brainstorm ridiculous inventions and build robust marketing strategies to help those ideas improve the world.

Saturday, February 17, 2018

Your skeletons have been dancing behind you since day one

Cameron’s school of thought, which has been fundamental in my own development as an artist, promotes the idea that writing writes things

She says that as we move our hands across the canvas of our lives, we paint more vividly the brush strokes of our experience. Our transitions become more consciously wrought. And writing becomes transformative, alchemical, empowering and enlightening. 

Writing writes things. 

Through this mantra, I discovered creating to be a healing and spiritual act that opens up a safe space for me to construct my own paradigms and examine my own world views and explain my own life to myself. 

And now, I can write my way out of anything. 

That’s one hell of a superpower. 

However, not everyone embraces this concept. The paradox of creativity is, it’s not only a form of restoration, but also confrontation. 

That’s why blank canvases paralyze millions of people every single day. Deep down, the fear is, if we write about something, and god forbid, publish it for all the world to see, that means we can’t be angry at it anymore. Or sad about it. Or upset with it. 

After all, we did sit down to process and exorcise our feelings around it, which means there’s no more room for skeletons. 

No wonder creative blocks are so prevalent. Because most people don’t really want to abolish the thing that’s giving them trouble. 

That would mean they’d have to actually take responsibility. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...   
What lies are your excuses guarding?

* * * *


Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Listen to the world's only product development and innovation gameshow!

Subscribe today. Join out community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs.  


Together we can solve real problems, brainstorm ridiculous inventions and build robust marketing strategies to help those ideas improve the world.

Friday, February 16, 2018

Quieting the monster inside your head

Parkinson’s law, which states that work expands to fill the time available for its completion, creates an interesting predicament for artists. 

Because most of us work alone. And so, if we have a problem, we have all of the time in the world to obsess over it. There simply aren’t enough structures and constraints to keep our minds occupied. 

Whereas people working a more traditional career path, complete with bosses and employees and offices and performance reviews, can’t afford to spend their entire morning walking a hole in the carpet, mentally tormenting themselves about what a worthless piece of shit they are. 

There’s too much work to be done. 

Which isn’t to say we should stay busy all the time, avoiding difficult emotions and the exhausting work of regulating them, hoping time will magically heal our pain. 

But if we don’t have enough things to bite into, our own chewing can’t drown out our mind’s chatter. If we have nowhere to be and all of the time to get there, the freedom works against us. And if we don’t have an arsenal of activities to quiet our mental monsters, we’ll become exhausted from fighting back all the worse case scenarios inside our head. 

That’s one of the reasons yoga has been so transformative for me. Because I spend all day living inside my head. It’s in the job description. 

But when I walk into the yoga studio for those critical ninety minutes, all I can do is focus on my breathing and pay exquisite attention to my body. It’s too hot and too crowded and too intense to drift off to exile inside our head. And by the time class is over, every problem I walked into the room with has been washed away like a face drawn in the sand. 

The point is, every artist runs the risk of having too much freedom. Too much time to reflect and obsess and disappear down the rabbit hole of their own mythology. 

And so, next time the familiar clouds start to gather above your head, give that energy something else to do. Give it a project. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...   
What will you do when you get tired of beating your head against a brick wall?

* * * *


Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Listen to the world's only product development and innovation gameshow!

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Together we can solve real problems, brainstorm ridiculous inventions and build robust marketing strategies to help those ideas improve the world.

Thursday, February 15, 2018

In a dark time, the eye begins to see

In the field of ocular physiology, there’s a concept called adaptation, which is the ability of the eye to adjust to various levels of darkness and light. 

It’s a complicated process that involves body parts like pupils and rods and cones and photopigments. 

Let’s focus on one particular element of the vision process. 

The fact that our eyes adapt to bright light over a period of five minutes, but total dark adaptation takes many hours. 

Isn’t that interesting? It’s just the way the human body works. Nature is smarter than us, and it has its own tempo and flow of which we are only a small part. 

And so, no matter how many articles we read about hacking our night vision by wearing sunglasses, eating blueberry jam, exercising the retinas, sleeping with eye patches, avoiding direct exposure and popping zinc tablets, the smartest thing we can do is let our eyes adjust to the darkness naturally. 

Acclimation through simply relaxing in perfect darkness for twenty or thirty minutes. And trusting that our eyes will soon open to more radiant visions of life. 

This concept of adaptation also has implications far beyond that of the human nervous system. There’s also the challenge of adjusting to the darkness from an emotional standpoint. 

Because people have a tendency to try and taste the light before their time has come. Before they’ve mined the darkness for all the gifts it contains. 

Moore’s influential book on finding our way through life’s ordeals puts it best. 

If you give all your efforts to getting rid of your dark night, you may not learn its lessons or go through the important changes it can make for you

The goal, then, isn’t to panic and start scrambling our way back to the light, but to develop a spirit of adventure that allows us to feel at home in the darkness. 

Knowing that the things we uncover in that dark place might change us forever. 


LET ME ASK YA THIS...   
How much beauty might you be missing out on by trying to accelerate your night vision?

* * * *


Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Listen to the world's only product development and innovation gameshow!

Subscribe today. Join out community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs.  


Together we can solve real problems, brainstorm ridiculous inventions and build robust marketing strategies to help those ideas improve the world.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

The beauty of being second banana

I heard a fascinating interview between a comedian and his manager. 

Both agreed that although every artist wants his name in the title of the show, having top billing was a dangerous move. 

Because it means you’re the single point of success and failure for the project. After all, you’re the star of the show, which means you have to carry the plot like an albatross from scene to scene. And that’s a ton of pressure. 

On the other hand, being second banana on a sitcom, that’s the good life. Because all you have to do you walk into the scene, deliver punchline after punchline, and then exit stage left. 

It’s the same difference between running your own business and working for somebody else. 

When you’re the sole proprietor, you have no choice but to do everything. It comes with the job description. Which might sound thrilling at first, especially if you’re an anal retentive perfectionist control freak who demands to do everything his own way, but after ten or fifteen years of that, it gets exhausting and unsustainable. 

Having to be responsible for operations and finance and customer service and sales and marketing and management, holy smokes, that’s a lot of hats to wear. 

It's like my entrepreneur turned corporate employee friend once said:

Now I work full time, but when I ran my own business, I worked all the time.

I’m reminded of brilliant satire article about the pros and cons of freelance employment. One of the items on the list was that freelancers are able to set their own work/searching for work balance. 

That perfectly sums up the entrepreneurial lifestyle. There is no downtime. Every day you’re fighting for your life, because everyday might be your last. 

But hey, at least you get to have your name in the title of the show, right? 

What an ego trap. In a world where millions of people are quitting their comfy day jobs to start their own risky businesses and become their own bosses, being second banana never sounded so good. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...   
How sustainable can your one man show really be?

* * * *


Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Listen to the world's only product development and innovation gameshow!

Subscribe today. Join out community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs.  


Together we can solve real problems, brainstorm ridiculous inventions and build robust marketing strategies to help those ideas improve the world.