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Monday, September 25, 2017

Starting work that you’re proud to finish

You don’t actually learn anything in college, it just shows you can complete something. 

That’s far more significant and respected and attractive than the yawnable ability to solve equations and memorize dates and regurgitate an ocean of information about eighteenth century romantic poetry. 

After all, we live in a world that rewards finishing. Following through. Fully and faithfully realizing the execution of a difficult, expensive, exhausting and long term endeavor, however imperfect that journey might have been. 

And yet, most people don’t finish things. Their creative landscapes are littered with the false starts. Grandiose but abandoned projects that have since calcified into monuments of their momentary bursts of enthusiasm. 

Miller’s advice to young novelists comes to mind. Rule number six was:

Cement a little every day, rather than add new fertilizers

Focus on finding the right foundation. Better to produce a small handful of solid ideas than to promise a hundred shaky ones. 

Also meaning, don’t get mired in the manure. If most people calculated the number of hours they spent avoiding the work in favor of disappearing down the rabbit hole of their own mental horseshit, they wouldn’t be able to look themselves in the mirror. 

There’s actually an obscure term in the dictionary for this very archetype. 

finifugal is a person who hates endings and tries to avoid or prolong the final moment of a story, relationship or some other journey. 

Not that everything in this life has to be finished. Some projects are meant to be abandoned. Some journeys shouldn’t come to an end. 

But if we have any intention of changing the world and ratcheting up our species, we ought to err on the of completion. 

We ought to show people, especially ourselves, that we can complete something.  

LET ME ASK YA THIS...  
Are you abandoning projects that are too familiar in order to experience the initial high that came at the beginning?
LET ME SUGGEST THIS... 

For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Sunday, September 24, 2017

Overdrawn at the favor bank

Seventeen years ago, I started wearing a nametag twenty four seven, just to make people friendlier. 

And it worked. Better than I could have possibly imagined. Thanks to my curiosity experiment, I’ve been able to connect with tens of thousands of people around the world whom I otherwise never would met, many of whom have become lifelong friends. 

I even built a brand, a business and a career out it. 

That’s why friendly sticks. It costs nothing, but has the power to change everything. 

The challenge, though, is making sure we don’t go overboard. Because as a useful as nametags are, the people we meet don’t want to get that sticky adhesive goop all over their shirt. 

When I conduct corporate training seminars for hotels and hospitality professionals, we always run a module on the dangers of being too friendly. Both internally with coworkers, and externally with guests. 

And what I’ve learned after doing hundreds of these workshops is, every nametag has a border. What’s yours? 

To help define the limits of your friendliness, consider asking yourself and your team a few of these questions. 

Are you so friendly that you aren’t taken seriously?

Are you so friendly that it’s easy to say no to you? 

Are you so friendly that you lack healthy boundaries? 

Are you so friendly that you can’t enforce the rules?

Are you so friendly that people perceive you as needy? 

Are you so friendly that you unknowingly offend those you love? 

Are you so friendly that you have become overdrawn at the favor bank? 

Are you so friendly that strangers grow suspicious of your true intentions? 

Are you so friendly that others misinterpret your behavior as manipulative? 

Are you so friendly that you avoid the necessary conflict that leads to healthy growth? 

Are you so friendly that you inhibit people from taking responsibility? 

Are you so friendly that you fail to consider other people’s feelings? 

Remember, every nametag has a border. 

Find out where you draw the line, otherwise you’ll inadvertently give people permission to cross it. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...  
Where are you being too friendly in your life?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS... 
For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Saturday, September 23, 2017

It’s hard to hear the voice of change

I thrive on ritual and routine and structure and organization and decisiveness and commitment. 

That’s how my personality orients itself to the external world. Through constants and practices that reinforce my sense of control over myself and my environment. 

Even in the smallest degrees and most innocuous moments, I will find a way to intentionally design and manage the user interface of my daily existence, bringing a measure of coherence back to my life. 

The challenge with this particular personality is, it makes it hard for me to hear the voice of change. Because I have a strong will that insulates me against external influence. My sense of individualistic defiance is off the charts. 

Which means, every choice I make must be an expression of my own identity. True change only happens when it’s my idea. 

I’m reminded of something a friend of mine once said:

I get tired of hearing that people never change. People only change, that’s all they do. Sure, there are patterns and repeat offenders. There are routines and rituals. These are hard to break and sometimes we don’t need to. But we are still creatures for the most part who have a choice. These little choices add up and throw a bigger decision your way. Keep going, or do something about it? 

Josh is right. Just because humans are build without an easy way to change, doesn’t mean we can’t embrace it. Hell, every single cell in our skeleton is replaced every seven years. There’s no reason to lose hope about real change being possible. 

And so, whatever your personality is, don’t limit how your growth can happen. Yes, it’s hard to change what you feel so safe with. But even the most disturbing or unexpected or minor experiences can lead us in the direction of positive change. Even the smallest events or situations can be metabolized into breakthroughs in thinking and action. 

We just have to be willing to take in all of the available healing energy of the world around us. 

To be open to help that arrives in forms we’re not crazy about. 

To search for as many diverse sources of support as we can, walking as many paths that lead to change as we can. 

To commit to looking for new and interesting ways to transform. 

And to trust that although the seeds of change grow slowly, and although we rarely underestimate just how long change takes, the waiting part is necessary and important. 

Your healers will come when you need them. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...  

What makes it hard for you to hear the voice of change?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS... 

For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Friday, September 22, 2017

Trusting people to step into the uniqueness of their own journey

Rand’s iconic protagonist asked the question:

What greater wealth is there than to own your life and spend it growing? 

It’s a deeply empowering philosophy because it reminds us that we don’t have to apologize for growing. Even if we feel survivor’s guilt about those we’ve left behind, the harsh reality is, we can’t bring everyone with us on the journey. 

Each man is responsible for their own evolution, learning his own lessons his own way in his own time. 

And in fact, looking to people who have not gone on their own journey to support us when we start to grow is an exercise in futility. 

Like that childhood friend you’ve been drifting apart from for years. Every time you go home for the holidays and meet up for your annual beer to rehash cherished memories from twenty years ago, he starts to passive aggressively make you feel guilty for growing up and moving on with your life and not taking him with you. 

Apparently the beer isn’t the only thing that’s bitter around here. 

Of course, the resentment your friend harbors isn’t a reflection, it’s a projection. It says more about his station in life than yours. And since it’s not your job to take responsibility for other people’s feelings, all you can do is be proud of the choices you’ve made and the things you’ve done and the person you’ve become. 

Trusting that the other person will step into the uniqueness of their own journey when the time is best. 

Remember, nobody can walk the path for you, nor can you walk the path for them. 

Each man believes in the bright lights of freedom by his own accord. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...  
Whenever you begin to experience the fullness that life has to offer, do you immediately feel as if you are betraying those who never had a chance?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS... 
For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Fooling yourself into delusions of quality

Technology has a tendency to inflate the composition process. 

Because when an artist starts with electronics, they can easily fool themselves into thinking that what they’re working on is better than it really is. 

When the songs are buttressed by effects and computers and pedals and samples, they can’t always tell if the core idea is legitimately good, or lavishly produced. 

Which doesn’t make the music any less enjoyable. I love singing in the car to top forty hits that are produced within an inch of their lives just as much as the next guy. But from a creative standpoint, we must be careful not to use fancy tools as pillars to hide behind. 

Otherwise it sucks the soul out of the process. 

Macleod’s bestselling book on creativity says it best:

Pillars do not help, they hinder. The more mighty the pillar, the more you end up relying on it psychologically, the more it gets in your way. Successful people, artists and non artists alike, are very good at spotting pillars. They’re very good at doing without them. Even more importantly, once they’ve spotted a pillar, they’re very good at quickly getting rid of it. Good pillar management is one of the most valuable talents you can have on the planet. If you have it, I envy you. If you don’t, I pity you. 

And so, the questions we have to ask ourselves are, what creative pillars are we hiding behind? What obfuscations are we leaning on to compensate for our lack of quality, talent and originality? And how many external tools are we giving too much credence and superstition in our work? 

Good ideas executed will always have room to succeed. 

Keeping it simple is great advice for injecting work with soul, but starting with simple is perhaps more important for sustaining. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...  
What technology are you hiding behind? 

LET ME SUGGEST THIS... 
For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Head Up, Heart Higher -- Chapter 07 (2017) Scott Ginsberg Animated Folk Rock Opera

Tricking myself into feeling that
Security, security, security
It won't free me, complete me, make me whole
Phase me, amaze me, save my soul

Cue the lights
Start the dramatic score

Glue my knuckles tight
Zoom in on my lungs

No chicken count
Banner waving that

Security, security, security
It won't free me, complete me, make me whole
Phase me, amaze me, save my soul

Cue the lights
Start the dramatic score

Glue my knuckles tight
Zoom in on my lungs

What if I knew that nothing
Was missing for me right now?

What if I knew that nothing
Was missing for me right now?

What if I knew that nothing
Was missing for me right now?

This is it, this is as good as it gets
This is it, the best day of my life

This is it, this is as good as it gets
This is it, the best day of my life

This is it, this is as good as it gets
This is it, the best day of my life

 


Watch the whole movie here.

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Before you ask, the answer is always no

The scariest part about asking for help is, we risk sharing something that most people don’t want to share. 

That we’re struggling. 

That’s why asking for help makes us feel exposed. Because we’re opening up our deepest desires to the world’s scrutiny, rejection, disappointment and, worst of all, indifference. 

But as terrifying as it is to swallow our pride, extend our arm, lay down our mask and surrender into the gut churning surge of vulnerability, it’s always worth it. 

Because once we push through to the other side, something extraordinary happens. 

People are delighted to hear from us. They’re honored that we asked for their help. They’re inspired by our level of clarity and courage about what we really want. And in most cases, they’re happy to help in whatever way that they can.

It’s like my college professor used to say:

Friends want you to call on them. They want you to darken their doorstep in the middle of the night with your heart in your hands. Nothing would bring them more satisfaction than the opportunity to be there for you. It’s in the job description. That’s what friends do. If they didn’t want to help, they wouldn’t be your friend. 

Perhaps you’re looking for new career opportunities. You might begin by reaching out to let people know the kind of value you’ve provided for clients in the past with the hope that it might be useful to someone they know. 

In this situation, however, it’s not quite enough to simply ask friends and colleagues who they know that they would recommend you contact. It’s also critical to have the empathy to ask them what role they would be willing to play in connecting you, have the graciousness to follow up in a way that shows you appreciate their efforts, show the forethought to anticipate their potential level of involvement, and have the astuteness take measures to minimize any inconvenience and awkwardness during the conversation.  

Instead of creating the mental impression that they can’t help us, we believe that we’re a welcome presence. Instead assuming it’s an imposition on the person we’re asking, we believe that we possess tremendous value that we’d be remiss not to offer. 

And instead of thinking that our receiving is going to deprive somebody else, we believe that their generosity will be commensurately rewarded. 

Remember, before you ask, the answer is always no. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...  
How many people did you ask for help today? 
LET ME SUGGEST THIS... 

For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Monday, September 18, 2017

Life rarely has a predictably grandiose slow clap crescendo

My favorite movies are the films where not much happens except for life itself. 

They simply chronicle the way ordinary time unfolds for people. The characters gently drift down a stream of consciousness with no particular direction in mind, without the mechanics of a plot, a dramatic three act structure, a formal narrative arc, an action packed car chase or a predictably grandiose slow clap crescendo that wraps everything up in tidy cinematic bow before the credits roll. 

These movies feel spontaneous. They flow with a nice naturalness. Like documentaries with invisible cameras and no professionally trained actors. 

That’s why they resonate so deeply with people. Because they mirror real, authentic life. They honor man’s search for exquisite ordinariness. 

Which is especially refreshing in culture where every thirty second advertisement chews up the scenery and brutalizes its viewers with an onslaught of contrived melodramatic choreography to sell another bullshit product they don’t need. 

Look, there’s no doubt that story are the tools that help human beings structure and interpret reality, make sense of life and bring order to a world that is confusing and scary. The human brain is psychological primed for narrative. 

But if we spend too much time disappearing down the rabbit hole of our own mythology, we lose sight of the fact that in great movie of life, not that much happens. And when it does, there’s no award winning audio engineer standing by to cue the orchestra. 

Our job, then, is to be open to the whole journey. To stay in step with the natural rhythm of things. To gentle with ourselves when we get stuck. To trust that the waiting part of change is necessary. 

Beattie said it best in her book about the journey to the heart:

The desert cactus that blooms briefly once a year doesn’t consider all the moments it is not in bloom wasted. It knows that the rest of the year is beautiful and important too. 

Closure is an illusion. Life a collage of disparate images pinned together less by narrative force than by states of individual feeling.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...  
Will you wait for life to reward you with a standing ovation, or accept its few quiet moments of truth?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS... 

For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!