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Monday, April 24, 2017

The attraction of working versus the arrogance of waiting

I once stumbled across an application for a sales position that made the following disclaimer. 

We are an evangelical ministry, and our strategic plan is to use prayer to attract new customers

Well then. That’s certainly one way to run a business.  Hope it works out for that company. 

Although in my experience, the best way to get new customers is through the attraction of working, not the arrogance of waiting. 

That phone isn’t going to ring itself. No matter how much you want it to. No matter how many magic words you recite. 

And not that prayer doesn’t have its benefits. Yoga gurus at the turn of the century were telling people how the repeated performance of an action created a mental blueprint of subtle electrical pathways in the brain, like the grooves in a record, which their lives would positively follow. 

And more recently, scientists have pioneered a new field of research called neurotheology, which is the study of the correlation between the brain and religious or spiritual beliefs and practices. 

Apparently prayer can lead to higher levels of activity in the frontal lobes, which handle focused attention. 

But ask anyone who’s run a business for more than a few years, you don’t want to spend too much time crossing your fingers. It’s a complacent, passive and unsustainable way to run an enterprise. 

Only through action and motion and movement do you truly ring the register. 

Pray as much as you want, but don’t forget to unsteeple your fingers and put them to work creating real value for real people in the real world.

LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
Are you working or waiting?
LET ME SUGGEST THIS... 
For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Sunday, April 23, 2017

The unusual receptivity of their creator’s eyes

The unusual receptivity of their creator’s eyes. If we are to convey the distinct timbre of our thoughts and make pronouncements truly worthy of the world’s attention, it all beings with the quiet moments that we notice out of the corner of our eye. 

The openness to allow those unremarkable events to fill our soul with remarkable delight. And the audacity to put them wax and carry our truth to market. 

Schulz, as an example, was a fine draftsman. No doubt about it. He couldn’t have created the most popular comic strip in history by having a subpar illustrating ability. 

But his highest talent, colleagues say, was his capacity to find inspiration in life’s daily occurrences that most people took for granted. To stay forever attuned to the everyday absurdity of ordinary experiences. 

That’s why the characters still endure to this day. It was the unusual receptivity of their creator’s eyes. 

How do we train ourselves to do the same? How do get that muscle all quivering and veiny and oiled up? 

A good place to start is our own backyard. Quite literally, in fact. 

I’m reminded of a police mystery novel whose protagonists said, a good cop depends on his sense of inappropriateness. What doesn’t fit? What’s out of the ordinary? What’s the wrong type of face or car for this neighborhood? That’s how he knows his beat. A longstanding habituation to place. 

And so, each one of us can strengthen that muscle by simply stepping out the front door, walking down our street and start searching for things that don’t fit. Looking around in the course of a typical day for examples of inconvenience. 

That’s where art begins. Hiding behind the unremarkable. 

And from that place of exquisite ordinariness, beauty and joy and transcendence ensue. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
Are you known for the strength of your pen or the receptivity of your eyes? 
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For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Stay with the reader beyond the last page

Patterson, the number one selling fiction novelist of all time, gives this advice to budding fiction writers:

Don’t think about the sentences, think about the story. 


That’s been his approach to writing dozens of bestselling novels for over thirty years. Rather than showing off with snazzy sentences, he focuses on the core of the scene. And it’s that story which grabs the reader’s attention quickly, makes them hold on for dear life, and makes his characters stay with the reader beyond the last page. 


I especially love that last part:


Beyond the last page. 


It suggests stickiness. Ideas that people can’t shake from their brains, no matter how hard they try. Like the tear jerking bridge in a love song that you want to rewind and listen to over and over again. 


That’s the challenge of all mass communication. Creating big stories that are important enough to believe, remember, spread and repeat. 


Not laboring over the scholastic perfection of every word and sentence and syntax, but making sure that the spine of the story is in good shape, and trusting that the rest will take care of itself. 


Because the audience’s eyes betray them. Snazzy sentences and flashy techniques can make any message sound good. 


But as any good musician will tell you, the last thing you want is your audience to stop listening and start watching. 


Don’t think about the sentences, think about the story. 


LET ME ASK YA THIS... 

What are the myths you want to tell people when you talk about what you do?
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For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Friday, April 21, 2017

Develop new ways of responding to things that scare you

A comedian friend of mine performs at a variety of open mics around town, almost every night of the week. 

His personal challenge for improving his comedy game is, he tries to throw himself off a cliff once a night. 

Meaning, there has to be one joke, one moment, one movement or one expression that terrifies him. Because it’s risky. It’s dancing on the edge of danger. The bit might not work. It might alienate half of the room. It might bring light to an awkward truth. And the club owner might ask him never to come back. 

But the reward is, the comic gets to feel like he’s creating in a risky way. The reward is, he’s learning how to risk in small doses. The reward is, he’s developing new ways of responding to things that scare him. And that’s where human aliveness comes from. 

Funny enough, comedy clubs aren’t that different from company boardrooms. Because in the corporate world, there is no incentive to throw yourself off the cliff. It’s quite the opposite. 

Most big organizations are so invested in minimizing risk, that truly disruptive ideas can never take hold. That’s why outside vendors and supplies and agencies and consultants know never to bring an innovation to someone whose main goal is to not get fired. Because those people are not in the bravery business. They’re not paid to take chances. 

They’re the guardians of the status quo whose job is to keep word from getting to the top of the wall. Good luck getting that guy to risk making someone upset with their initiative. 

The good news is, risk is relative. It’s whatever scares us. Failure doesn’t have to be expensive, it merely has to be embarrassing. 

And so, continually ask yourself the question:

How can I put myself in a state of risk again? 

Force yourself to try things that might now work. As my mentor used to say, you’re only as a good as you dare to be bad.

You can risk being cursed and denounced, or you can stay at home, take no risks and make no enemies.

LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
Will you leave excuses you have made not to throw yourself off the cliff?
LET ME SUGGEST THIS... 
For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Thursday, April 20, 2017

You are what you charge

When I first went into business, I would prepare for sales calls by spending twenty minutes in bathroom, quoting my fee in the mirror. 

It was humiliating. But that’s how scared I was. And in those early years, you have to take your confidence where you can get it. 

Of course, there’s nothing more maddening than the first time you actually do get the guts to ask for the money, and the prospective client doesn’t balk or even blink at the price. All you can think to yourself for the rest of the day is, damn it, I should have asked for more. 

My mentor once told me, if they say yes too quickly, you didn’t ask for enough. 

It’s a helpful principle of negotiation that I’ve always appreciated. Because it makes the process riskier. It invites you to add a little bravery to conversation an advocate for yourself. To look in the bathroom mirror, believe that you’re a welcome presence who’s creating value, and demand that you get paid what you’re worth. 

Even if that price makes the other person shift in their seats. 

It’s like my yoga instructor says. Better to feel slightly crappy during class than to suffer all day. 

The same principle applies to asking for the sale. Better to grab your balls and quote a uncomfortably high fee than to leave money on the table and hate yourself all day. 

Remember, you don’t get any bravery points for undercharging. Follow the fear. Use it as a foothold on the path to true aliveness. 

And remember that if you’re not scared, your dream is too small. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
What am I not charging for that people are telling me that they would pay money for?
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For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Those touchy mediocrities who sit trembling

Here’s an interesting riddle. 

You can’t spell comparison without the word prison


Think about it. That’s exactly what happens inside of our minds when we indulge the thief of joy. We add ten pounds to the bar wondering what the other guy is doing. We look at the people around us for evidence of why we’re not good enough or smart enough or successful. 


When the reality is, who other people are in regard to our path isn’t all that interesting. It’s just a distraction. An addiction. Procrastination in disguise. That’s the prison of comparison. 


Rand’s treatise on individualism puts it perfectly.


The hallmark of the second rater is resentment of another man’s achievement, those touchy mediocrities who sit trembling lest someone’s work prove greater than their own. 


Next time you feel the gasps of comparison arousing in your lungs, try asking yourself the following question. 


Is this going to forward me to better mental health, or is it going to fuel the idea that I’m not good enough? 


The answer is almost always the latter. That’s what we do. We spend too much time looking over our shoulder. 


We compare ourselves with others and forget the uniqueness of our own journey. 


LET ME ASK YA THIS... 

Which of your actions silently scream, I am not enough? 
LET ME SUGGEST THIS... 
For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

People’s expectations are their problem

Tyson said it best. 

Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face. 

Which is a holy mantra for the boxing world, but also helpful metaphor for the real world. 

Because there are always invisible forces working against us. Peer pressure, power structures, tribal gravity, social influence, family guilt, group dynamics, to name a few. 

And despite our most honorable efforts to stand by our values, the reality is, people may see our boundaries as a challenge and an invitation to push our buttons. 

For example, I’ve been sober my entire life. Not for medical or moral reasons, I just never found intoxication to be all that interesting. And no judgments for people who partake, either. Knock yourself out. 

What’s amazing is, the moment certain people learn about my history of abstinence, it suddenly becomes their personal life mission to get me wasted. They will not rest until the dysfunction of my sobriety is alleviated. 

Which aggravated me when I was young, but now, I just think it’s adorable. How sweet of them to want to make me their little project. 

But something I’ve learned from a lifetime of sobriety is, I don’t have to do something just because somebody expects it of me. People’s expectations are their problem. 

Of course, that can be a difficult stance to take. Especially on special occasions when we allow ourselves to be guilted into repeated pleas to make exceptions. 

Instead of holding our ground, we set ourselves on fire to keep everyone warm. 

Instead of paying ourselves first, we mindlessly collapse our agendas and priorities and values in the name of make others happy. 

Instead of taking a pass on that fourth slice of pie, we announce to ourselves, oh my god, right here, right now, it has suddenly occurred to me that I only live once. Where’s the whipped cream? 

Each of these responses checks the people pleasing box in our brains, but they also shatter our integrity at the same time. 

The secret, then, is to anticipate failure in advance. To visualize these boundary violating moments when we’re in a calm, cool state. And that way, we can execute when the pressure is on and the punches comes flying.

LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
When are you most likely to slip into trying to keep other people happy and forego your own needs?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS... 
For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!

Monday, April 17, 2017

Every one of us has to travel that road by our own steps

Roark once told his young architectural apprentice: 

If you want my advice, you’ve made a mistake already by asking me. Never ask people. Not about your work. If prepared a hash of words to stuff into your brain, it would be an insult to you and to me. 

It’s an interesting perspective. Because it’s important to walk with the wise and ask questions and breathe in help and feel supported. But in the end of the day, the only steps that matter are the ones we take all by ourselves, to quote one of my favorite songs

That’s the key difference between leaders and followers. They don't ask for a show of hands, they just say, get out of the way, here it comes. Leaders have the courage to stand on the verdict of their own minds, follow their inner guide even though they look like an idiot and risk alienating those who don’t understand, and change the world forever. 

Which is a terrifying prospect. But the good news is, if it’s never been done before, nobody can tell you what the demands are. Freedom asks us to invent our own steps. Or better yet, our own leaps. 

When I was in college and got the idea to write a book about nametags, I didn’t arrange a focus group on in which a group of campus leaders and influencers were asked about their perceptions, opinions, beliefs, and attitudes towards the product. I didn’t submit a draft to a peer review committee for feedback on the overall direction of its marketing initiative. 

I just wrote the book, hired my friend to design the cover, printed a few thousand copies, hot glued two free nametags in the back of every book and starting giving them away to anything that moved. 

And nobody said a word. They just cheered me on. 

Because it didn’t matter how good the content was. The context was more significant. Seventeen years and three dozen books later, I’m still here. 

It’s simple. 

Either you ask who’s going to let you, or you wonder who’s going to stop you. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS... 
Whose advice have you outgrown?

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For the list called, "99 Ways to Think Like an Entrepreneur, Even If You Aren't One," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2017-2018.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of 


The Nametag Guy in action here!