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Friday, September 20, 2019

Wedges of obstinacy where our pride splits at the throne

It’s true that our stubbornness comes from a deep sense of integrity. 

It’s true that our unyielding personality has served us well in many parts of our lives. 

And it’s true that there is no reason to reject healthy expressions of pride just because we don’t want to appear arrogant. 

But it’s also true that stubbornness can keep us lonely. When the tyranny of our individuality starts to rule us, and we are tempted to take our secret special separateness and run into the corner, that’s when our dogged determination bites us in the ass. 

It reminds me of a former coworker, who was quite possibly the most stressed out employee in the tristate area. She carried so much anxiety that the rest of the office had to take antidepressants just make it through staff meetings. 

What’s interesting is, it wasn’t a biological precondition, but a choice she made every day. She knew she was a stubborn person who acted bluntly and reflexively towards her coworkers, and that caused problems time and time again. She knew that her obstinacy caused misunderstandings that she would have to carefully manage, and that led to daily tension with the team. 

But as she famously said to me, those are problems worth having. 

To which we all responded, wow, really? Shouldn’t we be trying to create fewer unnecessary pressures and stressors, not the other way around? 

Chambers was right when he observed, there are wedges of obstinacy where our pride splits at the throne. 

Stubbornness truly can keep us lonely. In a world where shared effort and cooperative spirit is one of the few things we can count on to move our species forward, perhaps there are more important things that our pride right now. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Do you have the capacity to respond flexibly to what the world hurls at you? 

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

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Thursday, September 19, 2019

With expectation wringing out our spine

The more that our internal narratives are governed by words like should and deserve and entitle and demand, the more that dissatisfaction courses through our veins. 

Language is just that powerful of a lever. It’s the primary mechanism that pegs our sense of happiness to expectation, to the anticipation of what we think the world owes us because of who we are and how hard we worked and how much we wanted it. 

For this reason, some startup must invent an inbox plugin that warns you when you start writing emails using expectation based language. 

Expecto would be a gentle but useful tool for building awareness of how you produce unnecessary stress for yourself through your attachments and their subsequent disappointments. This browser feature will help you step away from contingent living by using language that doesn’t deny what is, but rather, accepts that there is, and never was, control over anything in the first place. 

And now instead of living your life with fear and anxiety wringing out your spine, you can soak in the possibility of finding freedom from the tyranny of expectation. Now instead of the suffering of living in bondage to your insatiable desire, you can forgive reality for being what it is and actually have gratitude for the joy of living. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Where do you feel most burdened by the weight of expectations?
* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

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Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Somebody farts an idea and get five million dollars

Value comes from volume. 

The best way to a good idea is to have a lot of ideas. 

And so, the question is not whether we finish what we start, but whether or not we start enough things to eventually find something worth finishing. 

Even if our boss complains that he can’t have every deadbeat on the payroll pestering him with their idiotic brain waves, we still can’t allow the fear of failure corrupt any new action. 

In fact, sometimes the pressure to finish everything we start leads to procrastination and perfectionism and apprehension, or worse yet, quitting before we even start. What’s more, sometimes get so focused on reaching the finish line that we don't take the time to reward ourselves for what we have already achieved so far. 

Arendt’s philosophy of labor comes to mind, which is that each person is free to make new and meaningful beginnings in both thought and action. Reminding us that there might be a monster lurking in the shadows looking to devour our initiative capacities, but there is still no upside to not taking the first step. 

Just keeping starting things. Trust that whatever will finish, will finish. Resist the urge to chastise yourself for not shipping every idea that pops into your brain. And accept that no action ever attains its intended goal anyway. 

Finishing ideas may very well be the safest future we can have, but the joy and exhilaration of initiating lots and lots of ideas counts for much more than we realize. 


LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Are you starting enough things to eventually find something worth completing?
* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

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Monday, September 16, 2019

An entire population scrapes the soil in search of roots

Although loneliness has come to be the new poverty in modern society and the most common ailment of the modern world, it wasn’t always like this. 

As a species, our isolation has grown ever more pronounced with each passing decade. The shared pursuit of the public good has been replaced by the solitary quest for private goods. And the social connectedness which most powerfully determines our wellbeing has been reduced to leaving comments on people’s social networks while taking a shit. 

This is why we are filled with a longing for reunion with each other. 

Keen’s groundbreaking text on the journey to authentic selfhood characterizes this human narrative perfectly. 

Primitive people had none of the dreaded sense of not belonging, of isolation, of meaninglessness, which so devastates the heart of modern man. There was nowhere that he did not feel he belonged. 

But the illusion we upload, the lie we have chosen to die for, is that we are separate selves. That we don’t actually exist within a community of interdependent beings. 

This decent into isolation had been the ultimate cowardice of the human race. Opting out of our social birthright, spending far too much time sequestering ourselves into the corners of our own little worlds, zombifying ourselves with the digital heroin of the internet, we should be ashamed of ourselves. 

We are better than this. 

My observation is that the two themes that undergird all human suffering are lack of connection, and the inability to make a contribution. 

These two things are not inside jobs. We can’t do them alone. 

Wearing a nametag every day for the past twenty years has taught me many things, chiefly among them, that just one person can make the difference between isolation and connection. 

Because contrary to popular conditioning, we are never alone in this world unless we choose to be. 

Loneliness may be the oldest ache in the bones of humanity, but has a cure. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...

Where in your life do you need to move from stagnation and isolation into expansion and cohesion? 

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

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Sunday, September 15, 2019

When you are feeling knotted by fear’s tensions

Generosity that comes from a place of love actually enriches us, not just the people to whom we are generous. 

It’s a potent vaccine that inoculates us against unworthiness and disconnection. Even when our gifts are not reciprocated the way we hope them to be, or at all. Nobody can hinder us from the joy and meaning we experience during the process. 

Spezzano’s psychology research on the unconscious patterns of heartbreak hypothesized that we cannot be rejected unless we are trying to take something. If we only want to give, we can’t be pushed away. If we only want to give, people’s response doesn’t matter, or at least, it doesn’t disappoint us. 

That’s the power of generosity. When it’s clean, when it’s expressed without condition or strings or expectations, there are no losers in the exchange. The process is what rewards us, not the result it has on others. 

And the good news is, our gifts do not wilt when they are seemingly unnoticed. The generous among us are not fools who are easily taken advantage of. 

We are the recipients. We are the benefactors. We are the ones who feel fully alive and connected when we extend our hand to the world. Other people may or may not enjoy or even notice what we have to give, and that’s okay, because our hearts are the ones that are full. 

Matthews sings a beautiful lyric about this:

If you give, you begin to live. If you give, you get the world. But you might die trying. 

Next time your most generous intentions are feeling knotted by fear’s tensions, try giving yourself away anyway. 

It’s an infinite game with one team and no losers. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
How do you feel when you know that you have given yourself utterly to the world?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

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Saturday, September 14, 2019

Gently, gently make room for transcendence at last

The desire to consume is a form of lust. 

It’s that psychological force producing intense wanting for some object to fulfill our emotional and existential needs. 

And the problem is, the charlatanic industries that take advantage of our addiction to stuff use consumer goods to bait that lust, even though they never actually satisfy it. 

Because all consumption comes with a limited ceiling of satisfaction. Otherwise it would not be good for the bottom line. Companies are built on repeat business, and repeat business is built on the sacred external objects we seem to have attached to our happiness. 

But for those of us who are not armored against the seductions of this age, here’s the key to remember. 

Every type of con relies upon the same thing. Distracting us from the obvious, which is that we’re all going to die, and whatever we think we need to consume in the meantime, it won’t solve anything for us. It won’t put an end to this terrible search for something that we know will ultimately not give us fulfillment. And whatever they told us would be waiting for us on the other side, it isn’t there. 

Because anything worthwhile in this life is an inside job. 

Happiness, fulfillment, love, meaning, satisfaction, esteem, purpose, worthiness, whatever transcendent experience we are in search of, whatever we think will make our heart stilled into astonishment, it’s already there. It always was. 

The bush never stopped burning. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What if you knew that nothing was missing for you right now?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

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Friday, September 13, 2019

The surges of everlasting nature enter into me

Each of us has a handful of things that are a deep part of our nature, things that are not some silly stage, things that are not going to be outgrown in a few years. 

And we should honor those things. Once we discover the full offering we were born to give, our lives ought to be lived every day as a true expression of those values, with clear and air tight boundaries around them that are fully integrated into our being. 

But if it’s true that the self that goes on changing goes on living, then everything else that isn’t us, we must let go of. Willingly and lovingly. Consenting to the annihilation of ourselves, in the service of the soul that we are, trusting that it has come to this earth to tackle the tremendous project of evolution, and needs to run a bit leaner. 

Camus comes to mind, who writes in his book about death:

Anxieties dissolved into the air like wounded birds, and in their place came an arid lucidity. But calm will hide this living heart, defenseless against the slow forces within me that were saying no. 

This is what letting go feels like. It’s a death. A goodbye to the part of us that we thought was the heart of us. Our old life leaves as the new one enters. And we resist for as long as we can. Building a brick wall to keep things from changing. 

But as scary and sad it is to lose that chunk of who we are, it’s certainly more liberating and less stressful than the alternative. And it’s something we never regret. 

Letting the surges of our everlasting nature enter into us, while all the false selves melt away, nobody looks back on their death bed and wishes they did less of that.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Are you mistaking failure as a sign of failure or a signal of growth? 

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

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Thursday, September 12, 2019

Not completed until it reaches someone somewhere

Hyde’s formative research on creativity reminds us that the gift must stay in motion. 

As artists, he says, giving the first creation away makes the second one possible. Our bestowal creates that energy place into which new energy may flow. And as long as the gift is not withheld, our creative spirit will remain a stranger to the economics of scarcity. 

Music is perfect example. Because a song is not completed until it reaches someone somewhere. And so, performing live, even if it’s only for an audience of one, gives the artist the chance to keep their gift in motion. The song moves beyond the self as an offering from the artist to audience. Now it’s real. Living and breathing in the world. 

Busking helped me learn this lesson in a very special way. By returning to the same neighborhood park each weekend to share my latest songs with the community, it created an apparatus of public accountability. This ritual of bestowal that allowed each of my songs to be completed through the gift exchange. 

And as a result, this process completely transformed my relationship to the creative process. By adding a meaningful and public layer of social exchange to my work, the energy of the songs actually grew stronger, deeper and more abundant. 

In a way that simply playing them alone in my room couldn’t. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Are you giving yourself the gift of sharing, even when you're at your lowest moments? 

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

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