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A brand, a business and a career. From a nametag.

Sunday, April 05, 2020

Ch Ch Ch Ch Changes, Day 04 -- Emotional Capital

Change is hard for all of us, myself included. In this new series, I'll be sharing daily mediations on transition, change, reinvention. Look out all you rock and rollers, turn and face the strange. 

# # # 


Each of us needs our own fuel source. Our own oxygen supply. 

We can't be dependent on externals for our equilibrium. Otherwise we will constantly be shaken to and fro by daily events. 

In short, we deploy our emotional capital. The psychological assets and resources that buttress us, like patience, resilience, optimism and faith. That's what allows us to bounce back from failure and rejection. 

How’s the health of your account balance? Here are some questions to audit your funds. 

Do you let squeaky wheels derail you, or do you keep moving the story forward despite imperfections and annoyances? 

Do slights and rejections puncture the delicate fabric of your wellbeing, or do you take struggles in stride with a healthy dose of perspective? 

Are you thrown off balance by trivial incidents and mundane annoyances, or do you bounce back trusting their relative unimportance in the grand scheme of life? 

Do you get upset when somebody doesn’t live by your script, or do you stubbornly refuse to upset yourself when your strong desires are thwarted? 

If your answers skewed towards the first half of each question, then your psychological resources may be in need replenishing. 

Camille writes in her book about envy that the ego is a fragile little demon that gorges itself on our eternal discontent. Maybe that's a good place to start. 

If you want to refuel your emotional capital, practice announcing to yourself that who you are is enough to get what you want. Practicing announcing to yourself that you already have everything you need to do your thing. 

It's only a small donation to your account. And your ego won't be happy about the transaction. 

But the goal, not unlike a startup trying to keep the business afloat despite marketplace fluctuations, is to build an emotional foundation for scale. 

Over time, you will gain trust in your ability to right your ship when it drifts off course. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What inner resources will help you regain your equilibrium?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

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Saturday, April 04, 2020

Ch Ch Ch Ch Changes, Day 03 -- Moveable Frontier

Change is hard for all of us, myself included. In this new series, I'll be sharing daily mediations on transition, change, reinvention. Look out all you rock and rollers, turn and face the strange. 

# # #


Every organism must keep changing just to stay competitive. 

If we are not ready to adapt and remake ourselves as we grow and as the environment changes, then the world will evolve and leave us behind. 

Time waits for no man. Evolution has zero interest in our being happy. 

The good news is, as humans, our greatest tool for survival is our ability to change. Certainly, we fear change, but we are also remarkably quick to adapt to just about anything that doesn’t kill us. 

Whyte calls this the internal and secret marriage to the tricky and movable frontier called the self. It’s where we continuously improve what is, but we also make evolutionary leaps to what’s possible. 

Instead of pretending ourselves beyond our own evolution, we take a good look in the mirror, asking questions like this. 

What weaknesses have we been running from that it’s finally time to embrace? 

What edges have we been resisting for years that we must now make friends with? 

Hoffman, my favorite venture capitalist and tech entrepreneur, writes about this in his bestselling book about the startup of you:

Keeping yourself in permanent beta forces you to acknowledge that you have bugs, that there’s new development to do on yourself, that you will need to adapt and evolve. 

Sound painful? 

It is. Letting go of outdated parts of ourselves can feel like a death. 

Then again, what hurts even more is pretending that we’re more evolved than we really are, and then unexpectedly getting chewed into a bloody pulp by some unexpected flying creature that breathes fire and knows how to write code. 

May as well pick the path with the highest growth potential. 

If we want to avoid rendering ourselves obsolete and helplessly dependent, we must figure out which parts of our self the world is finally asking us to outgrow. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What is the driving force of your career evolution?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

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Friday, April 03, 2020

Ch Ch Ch Ch Changes, Day 02 -- Letting Go

Change is hard for all of us, myself included. In this new series, I'll be sharing daily mediations on transition, change, reinvention. Look out all you rock and rollers, turn and face the strange.

# # #


There's a difference been adaptation and evolution. 


Adaptation is a specific process of adjusting ourselves to become better suited to our environment. It's undergoing modification to fit our new circumstances. 


Evolution, however, is a broader term that refers to any change in anything over time. It's the gradual development of something from a simple to a more complex form. 


But the two ideas work hand in hand. Despite their differences, the theme of both concepts is the same. 


Letting go. It's about not getting stuck on something we first envisioned for ourselves. 


Because if we insist on consistency all the time in all things; if we are over reliant on our winning strategy for every endeavor, we will never adapt or evolve. 


Personally, my mistake was being way too religious about how I earned my money. It's my stubbornly entrepreneurial and relentlessly independent personality. Profitable as that may have been, it also put limits on where my success could come from. 


And the epiphany was, oh wow, working by myself has finite earning potential. Not to mention a cap on overall job satisfaction. And in order to become better suited to the changing environment, in other words, to adapt, my career needed to diversify. 


Which meant working in a actual office, joining teams and collaborating with other human beings. It was far more complex than sitting in my living room in my pajamas making art all day, but ultimately more satisfying and less lonely. 


Such is the nature of evolution. We stay consistent in the micro, honoring our skills and talents; but we change in the macro, remaking ourselves as we grow and as the world changes. 


What do you need to let go of to keep moving the story forward? 


Once you figure that out, just know this. Each of us needs to find the balanced commitment to whatever our primary goal is, but with a willingness to pivot quickly when necessary. 


Because evolution doesn't favor the strong, it favors the most adaptable to change. 


If we can learn to do that slowly and constantly, we will triumph. 


LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What has always been heroic about your work that is now preventing you from growing?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


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Thursday, April 02, 2020

Ch Ch Ch Ch Changes, Day 01 -- Designating Significance

Change is hard for all of us, myself included. In this new series, I'll be sharing daily mediations on transition, change, reinvention. Look out all you rock and rollers, turn and face the strange.

# # #

Archimedes was a true renaissance man. 

Working as a mathematician, physicist, engineer, inventor, and astronomer, he became one of the leading scientists in history. 

You’ve probably heard his most notable quotation. 

Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world. 

What’s the secret to making his mantra work for your own life? 

In my experience, all leverage begins with belief. If you believe something hard is impossible, then you’ll never even start trying to achieve it. Doesn’t mean belief is the only tool you need, but it better be in your toolkit somewhere, otherwise it’s going to be one hell of an uphill climb. 

One question that’s help to ask yourself is this. 

How could you designate this as significant to yourself? 

Telling yourself that story will infect you with an energy that will help you grow in direct proportion with the challenge at hand. It will galvanize your initiative, commitment and resilience, which is far more valuable than authority, competence and influence. 

During many of my lowest times, whether they were marked by depression, unemployment or loneliness, going out of my way to announce myself that something mundane was actually paramount, changed everything for me. 

Gross, whose research on personal reinvention was pivotal during many of my own personal transformations, coined a helpful phrase called the designated impossibility. 

She said it’s when you designate something as significant to yourself, recognizing that you cannot accomplish it with the power you currently have, and knowing that you must reinvent yourself, or it will remain impossible. 

Sounds like a long enough lever to me. Archimedes would have been proud. 

Because the whole idea of moving the world doesn’t have to be overwhelming to the point of paralysis. We simply have to change ourselves in relation to it. 

One case study that comes to mind is a story that went viral about a decade ago. 

Ali was a middle eastern farmer who became rich and famous by selling sheep using a photo sharing app on his smartphone. Instagram, at the time, was still a new technology, and didn’t have in app purchases like it does today. 

But this man designated the growth of his business and wealth of his life as being significant, so he created a new context for himself. Ali never could have dreamed of that level of economic prosperity twenty years ago. 

In fact, he probably comes from a long family lineage of sheep herders, most of whom wouldn’t even believe his story if he told them. He found a source of leverage to reinvent the way he thought about business, farming, communicating and marketing. And that allowed him to move the world. 

If you want to acquire the capacity to make the impossible happen, remember this. 

It has less to do with authority, competence and influence, and more to do with initiative, commitment and resilience. 

The question is, how do people step into that kind of power? How is it that some farmer in the middle of nowhere can make the impossible happen? 

It starts with belief. Because if you think something hard is impossible, you’ll never even start trying to achieve it. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What are you not committed to, only because you don’t believe it can be done?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

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Wednesday, April 01, 2020

Allowed us back into the place where we are most powerful

Hyperfocus is the ability to hone in on a specific task, sometimes to the exclusion of everything else. 

It becomes a trance like state in which we concentrate until everything becomes invisible but the thoughts we think. 

This is both a blessing on a curse. 

From a creativity standpoint, we easily lose all sense of time and perspective and disappear into the glorious oblivion of flow as the ideas pour out of us like a waterfall. Not a bad way to spend an afternoon. 

It reminds me of all those nights in high school I whaled on my guitar in the basement until my fingers were bleeding, while the rest of my friends were out getting wasted. Would not trade those moments for anything in the world. Thank you very much, obsessive tendencies. 

On the flip side, what happens we are not even aware that we’re focusing so intensely? And what if our hyperfocus makes us so oblivious to the world around us that we lose the plot, or worse yet, send a message to others that we have scrambled priorities? 

It reminds me of all those mornings as an entrepreneur, spending hours designing beautiful and hilarious slide decks for imaginary presentations, instead of trying to book actual clients who would pay me real money to deliver those presentations. Woops. 

A classic tale of right focus, wrong target. Concentrating to a fault. Becoming over immersed in unproductive activities while ignoring our more pressing responsibilities. 

One tool for reigning in our superhuman focusing powers is introducing an external apparatus of accountability. To agree on some kind of physical cue to help us to snap out of hyperfocus. 

Like setting two alarm clocks, one ten minutes before quitting time to invite us to wrap things up, and another at the designated end point. 

Or asking a manager not to check up us you until a specified date. 

Or using a task management system to time box your work plan into daily or weekly iterations, after which no further changes will be made. 

Each of these cues are boundaries that enable us the freedom to focus to our heart’s desire, but also come back down to earth at a reasonable time. 

Remember, the ability to amuse yourself in the confines of your own mind for long stretches of time is both an asset and a liability. 

Use it wisely. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What is the potential cost of your constitutional undistractability? 

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

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Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs



Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Until everything becomes invisible but thoughts you think

Concentrate was a spooky game we used to play at sleepovers. 

The object was scare your friends by predicting their deaths. You begin by telling the person to close their eyes. Then you stand behind them, reciting gruesome chants and performing scary rituals while pounding lightly on their back with your fists. 

At the end when they open their eyes, whatever color they saw represented how they would die. 

Red meant stabbing, purple meant suffocation, blue meant drowning, and so on. 

It sounds morbid, but in my mind, this game was wildly fascinating. Not only because of my childhood obsession with horror movies and monsters, but also because the only rule was, concentrate. And concentration was one of those skills that came easy to me. 

Whatever the opposite of attention deficit disorder was, that was my diagnosis. And during the eighties when every kid was hopped up on whatever stimulant their pediatrician prescribed them for what seemed like over diagnosed fad, my ability to concentrate made me feel special, proud, healthy and creative. 

The best part is, my family and teachers never viewed it as a condition to medicate, but a gift to channel. 

That has served me well in every area of my life. 

The ability to concentrate until everything becomes invisible but thoughts you think, that can take you to the stars. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Where does your proficiency or difficulty in holding focus over time come from?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

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Monday, March 30, 2020

Metric Collective's Startup Masterclass || Season 1, Episode 1: Human Engines

This is going to sound ridiculously simplistic. 

You can’t spell startup without the word start. 

Oh, I know, powerful.

Listen, in the early stages of a new project, what you need right now, is a prototype. A minimum viable product. Something your team can react to and iterate off of. 

Okay folks, are you ready for some startup perspective?

Then welcome to Metric Collective!

# # #


Okay, let’s kick off today’s lesson, it’s called: Human Engines



To begin, let’s consider where the word startup originates. Entrepreneurs began using the term startup in the eighteen hundreds. It described a business venture, industrial project or commercial enterprise. 

The word startup literally means “to rise up and come suddenly into being.” 

Pretty cool huh? 

Back then, people who worked for startups, they, well, started things. They set projects into motion. Edison did it. Tesla did it. Darwin did it. Will you do it too? 

Well, that all depends on how much initiation capital you have in your account. Which is not something you get from the bank, an angel investor a your board of directors or from crowdfunding randos on the internet. Initiative comes from within. 

One lesson I’ve learned many times over in my startup experience, is:
     
Do whatever it takes to get your startup locomotive moving. Giving people a glimpse of what the ride with you might feel like. Team members, investors, partners, the media, they all need to see your training chugging. It will only be a matter of time before you inspire them to jump on board. 

The best part about the human engine is, you don’t have to be one hundred percent sure of yourself or your destination. Hell, I’ve been doing this stuff for almost twenty years, I still have no idea where I’m going. But to quote the great NBA player, Steve Nash, if you don’t know where you’re going, nobody can stop you. Not even you.

Oh yeah, basketball wisdom, baby.

Proving, that initiative is far more contagious than expertise.

Here’s a little case study for ya.

A few years ago, Mark Zuckerberg (you know him, right? The Myspace guy?) wrote about this human engine concept in his annual letter to investors. He said that instead of debating for days whether a new idea is possible, or what the best way to build something is, hackers would rather just prototype something and see what works. 

There's actually a great hacker mantra that you'll hear a lot around startup offices.

Code wins arguments. 

So good, right? Even if you’re not a programmer, code is just code for reality. It’s something that exists in the real world that you can touch, and that can touch you. 

Working at a startup is like that. Instead of saying you have an idea, you build a prototype of your idea and show it to people. 

By giving people something concrete to look at and think about, you can make progress before you know what progress looks like. 

It’s exhilarating. The process of watching something rise up and come suddenly into being, it’s one of the great privileges of the job. 

You get to give yourself permission to do the thing first. 

You get to start the train by being the human engine. Choo choo, baby. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What was the last thing you started?

No, seriously, I want to know. Send me a text message right now. 314/374-3397

And tell me about the last thing you started. I’m a curious guy, I wanna know.

Well folks, that’s gonna wrap up today’s lesson from The Startup Masterclass. 

Hope you got some much needed perspective.


Thanks for joining us at Metric Collective.

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

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From inception to completion

Soup to nuts is an idiom that goes back five hundred years as description of a full course dinner, progressing from beginning to end. 

At that time, soup was likely to feature as the first course of a formal meal, while a selection of nuts was offered as the last. 

Delicious. Bon appetite. 

This idea, tasty enough, can be applied to any our business projects. Because the goal is to achieve thoroughness. To manage our work from inception to completion. This requires the ability to think strategically, but also hold a long term focus while executing each step of the plan with determination and precision. 

Very few people are able to exist on both ends of the experimentation execution continuum. 

Working as an artist, entrepreneur or startup employee offers ample opportunity to hone this ability. Because in these particular environments, we have no choice but to build the boat and learn how to sail at the same time. 

Having produced hundreds of books, training videos, musical albums, educational films, podcasts, commercials, software programs and marketing campaigns over the past twenty years, both on my own dime and also within agencies, startups and large companies, one thing has become very clear to me. 

Determination naturally builds momentum. 

Even if we are scared because of a lack of information or experience, eventually, our fear melts into the madness of determination and we discover something so much better than perfection. 

Completion. 

Nobody can take that away from us. 

They can call us dirty because we have the guts to stick our hands in the mud, but done is done is done. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...

Are you seized by an irrational determination to forge ahead? 

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


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Sunday, March 29, 2020

That sounds like code for more work

Here’s my favorite question on the personality type quiz. 

Do you find visionaries to be somewhat annoying, or rather fascinating? 

In my experience, most companies and organizations will choose the first answer. Even if they act fascinated in the meeting, deep down, they are probably suspicious and threatened by that person. 

It’s a primeval reaction. Anytime some visionary marches into their office with a big idea, their collective corporate sphincter tightens like a shut faucet. 

But this is not their fault. Because people at organizations are not in the business of innovation, they’re in the business of minimizing risk, preserving the status quo, not getting fired, and of course, generating profit. 

Their economic perils are clear and immediate, and bringing on some visionary simply translates into more work for them. 

And so, the frustrations within the system can blamed on its weaknesses, rather than on individuals who operate within it. 

As the rappers say, don’t hate the player, hate the game. 

But also, don’t beat yourself up for losing that game just because people who barely know you are threatened by the genius of your avatar. 

Just accept that people are going to reject you outright, solely because of the special place you come from and the vibration that you carry with you, and that’s okay. 

It’s not their fault. They don’t know any better. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Don’t you just love the look on people’s faces when you break their brains? 

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs



Saturday, March 28, 2020

In full of all demands for additional bounty

Can we be comfortable without the hunger for more? 

Can we free ourselves from the constant demands for additional bounty? 

For those of us seeking a cosmic coloration in consciousness, this is an inner battle that will continue to wage on. And it will most certainly be one worth fighting. 

And so, whether we are starting a new business or changing careers or simply making a life transition, let us measure twice and cut once. 

To do so, our initial steps will be intention and attention. 

We will begin by announcing to ourselves that everything necessary for a having a fulfilling life is already part of us. We may not understand where to find it, or how to unearth it, or what it even is, but we will trust that it is available to us at no additional cost. 

This trusting intention counts for a lot, and it allows all our subsequent actions to flow more smoothly. 

Now, the other piece is noticing how often we look for more. Not beating ourselves up for being greedy, and not judging ourselves for trying to improve on the present moment, but simply noticing and naming the habit of extraneous desire. 

Keeping a jealous eye over yourself, as my favorite song lyric goes. If we can start there, from a place of trusting and noticing, then we won’t have to pay any attention to the tasty golden carrot dangling just the right distance to keep us on the hamster wheel. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
When will you have done enough to be happy with who you are?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs