Watch Scott's TEDx talk!

A brand, a business and a career. From a nametag.

See Scott's Movie

A concert documentary written, produced, scored and directed by Scott Ginsberg.

Steal Scott's Books!

Download every book Scott has ever written for free.

The Nametag Manifesto

Why everybody should wear nametags.

Brandtag Strategic Planning Crusades!

Make your mission more than a statement.

Interview Scott for Your Publication

Featured on every news network in the country.

Saturday, June 15, 2019

Every day your mind can be set in the right direction

Doctors tell us that we should exercise moderately for about thirty minutes a day. 

Pretty standard health advice. 

The only thing, our mind is actually the asset that must be worked on most and understood best. But there doesn’t seem to be a minimum daily requirement for mental exertion. 

And there should be. Especially when it comes to noticing and managing our more damaging thoughts. 

Emmett’s daily devotional was among the first books in the positive psychology revolution to explore how thoughts can shape our reality. One passage in particular comes to mind. 

Every time you dig up an old grievance or an old mistake by rehearsing it in your mind or, still worse, by telling someone else about it, you are simply ripping open a grave. Life is too precious for grave robbing. Let corpses alone. The past is past, liquidate it. If a negative memory comes into your mind, cremate it with the right thought and forget it. 

And so, instead of reflexively tumbling down the toxic rabbit hole of cynicism, we become aware of when our mind is being controlled by unpleasant feelings. 

Instead of allowing our mind to churn out thoughts veined with worry, we catch a negative seed being planted in our mind and gently uproot it. 

Proving to ourselves that we can still listen to our mind without taking it seriously. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...

What if you made a law for yourself today that you are not going to touch any mentally negative thing? 

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Friday, June 14, 2019

Recognizing reality and becoming comfortable with it

Manhattan pizza is not good because it doesn’t have to be. 

There are eight million angry, hungry, sweaty people in this city, and the majority of them are running late to something. 

Pizza is convenient, tasty, cheap and full of energy. And so, from an economics perspective, the shops have no real incentive to make amazing food. Because their demand is inelastic. Their audience is built in. 

Why would any business owner spend any extra time or money improving the quality of a product that millions of people are guaranteed to buy on price and convenience anyway, and forget about twenty minutes later? 

Pizza is like a cat. It doesn’t really care if you live or die, it just likes playing with you until it happens. 

Keep in mind, though, this isn’t an indictment of big city pizza joints. They’re just trying to make money and keep the lights on like every other business.

The lesson is about consumers understanding the context in which they are consuming. Having deeper empathy for the business reality of the world. Emptying their expectations about the transactional marketplace in which we live. 

Sometimes it’s less about the customer being right, and more about the customer being right there. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Are you ready to relieve yourself of the burden of trying to make outcomes match your expectations?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Thursday, June 13, 2019

We have seen the moment of your greatness flickering

The startup landscape is littered with the carcasses of young, enthusiastic, creative entrepreneurs, buried beneath the ashes of brave ideas, failed dreams and misguided expectations. 

My question is, when did we decide that was a bad thing? 

At least those people took a risk. At least they had the guts to follow their dream, put it all on the line, live on an unpaved road and hope to find some beauty at the end. 

Truth is, the fact that they didn’t make it out alive is a moot point. Because the world hasn’t seen the last of them. People like that are masters at learning fast, growing stronger and bouncing back with new skills to redirect their energies into something else. 

It’s only a matter of time before something they do sticks. 

That’s how greatness works. It’s platform agnostic. Team, position, hometown and league are irrelevant. If you’re great, you can be great anywhere. 

And forget about following your passion. Great people let their passion follow them. 

Allowing it to set up shop anywhere it needs to, making itself at home wherever they go. It’s like a universal power adapter with twin voltage converters that can channel electricity in whatever outlet is available. 

Here’s an interesting illustration from out left field: Arabian horses. 

Valentino was a champion yearling colt from about fifteen years ago. Even at the ripe age of two, bookings for future breeding started pouring in from around the world. Hundreds of them. Because horse owners knew that greatness was in his blood. 

Sure enough, once he began siring his offspring, each of those horses became great in their own right. Some became work horses, others became show horses, while others became race horses. 

But they were all great. Because of their conformation, how they were built, the way they moved, those beauties would have been great at whatever they did. They were the kinds of animals who could have done whatever needed to be done. 

The point is, trust your greatness. Be patient with it. When you see the moments of it flickering, don’t be in such a hurry to power the entire world. 

Sometimes it takes a while before the charge catches on. 

Just have faith that you take yourself with you everywhere you go. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
And it’s only a matter of time. Are you slowly orienting yourself to a sustaining source of power?
* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

On the verge of happiness only to have it stolen away from you

Camille reminds us in her book about envy that the ego is a fragile little demon that gorges itself on our eternal discontent. It sulks like a toddler when it doesn’t get its way. 

Personally, that sounds exactly like most of the battles inside my head. Tell me if this sounds familiar. 

Your ego cunningly tricks you into believing that happiness can be found in some other way. At some magical destination to be reached where you will finally be happily ever after. Just when you think you finally have everything you want you to be content, your ego steps in and says:

Oh really? Did you see that guy’s backpack? It’s much nicer than the one you have at home. Wait, isn’t that a bungee cord on the front panel for easy access? With two mesh side stretch pockets for easy water bottle storage? It’s probably not even that expensive. Why not treat yourself? You deserve it. Besides, your old backpack is almost a year old now. That’s like a lifetime in backpack years. Dude, this new bag is going to change everything for you. Things are going to be different from now on. And since same day shipping is free now, you can always return the bag for a refund before your wife even sees the delivery box. 

Indeed, our egos are working overtime to keep themselves entrenched. 

Despite the fact that more than a billion people on earth have never once gone shopping, our egos love to instill the overwhelming sense of urgency that we are just one purchase away from happiness. 

We must be willing to look beyond this illusion. 

Not to eliminate the ego, of course, but to notice and name it, see it for the bullshit that it is, and hope it goes away. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...

What’s the last impulsive purchase you kept a secret from someone because of guilt? 
* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Happiness isn’t good enough, we demand euphoria

Nobody has complete integrity all of the time. 

Life is messy, complicated and unpredictable. No matter how honorable and authentic we purport to be, the reality is, everyone does what they have to do to survive and be happy. 

We all work out our own brand of compromise. We all find compartments to put things in that make them okay. 

Sometimes we even sell our soul if times are tough and the price is right. 

A friend of mine in his sixties once made a poignant observation. He said:

It doesn’t matter if you choose the future that’s cheaper, it only matters if it’s the one you want. 

His insight helped me realize something. There is no such thing as settling. That’s just a word people use when life doesn’t match their fantasy. 

But that’s the danger in viewing our cement stance as some kind of mark of heroism. We’re so busy congratulating ourselves on our flawless integrity that we actually miss out on many of the unexpected opportunities that would have come our way had our hearts been more malleable. 

Besides, the word settling comes from the root sahtlenm, which simply means, to content oneself. 

When did we decide that wasn’t enough? When did euphoria become the price of admission for a fulfilling life? 

If we ever want to reach that place of enduring contentment with ourselves, we must let go of the need to have things work out our way all the time. 

Because without that ability to trust that which is good enough, life becomes an asymptotic death march to an impossible to reach marshmallow fantasyland. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
How has your definition of personal integrity evolved?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Monday, June 10, 2019

Open to everything, attached to nothing

Being picky isn’t the problem, it’s the symptom. 

The problem is, we have expectations. The problem is, we are afraid of taking risks, being wrong, looking foolish and getting hurt. The problem is, we are addicted to the identity of a person of heroic integrity who holds impossibly high standards for themselves and others. The problem is, we romanticize the fairytale of finding the ideal partner or the perfect job that’s going to change everything and complete our life and make us whole. 

Perhaps our pickiness is a sign that some letting go may be in order. 

Perhaps maintaining this posture in a contracted state of fear so we’re never taken by surprise is no longer serving our goals. 

A mentor of mine once told me that being religious about how you make your money is the quickest way to go out of business. That was a powerful insight for me as an entrepreneur, but also for my life as a whole. 

It challenged me to avail myself of every opportunity to create value for others, even if it was out of my comfort zone. It invited me to move in direction of being more open to all kinds of new relationships, even if they didn’t satisfy all seventeen of the bullet points on my list of desirable human attributes. 

Look, each of us remakes ourselves as we grow and as the world changes. Each of us evolves our criteria for what we find attractive and meaningful as we evolve ourselves. And so, we say yes to life, even though we know it will devour us. 

Because those yeses, imperfect and scary as they may be, are our currency for fulfillment. They’re like helium. And they will translate into positives, if we only let them. 

Being picky, it tends to makes our lives smaller and heavier. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Are your expectations serving or frustrating you? 

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Sunday, June 09, 2019

Fertilizing the bad fruit hoping for a good harvest

People love bragging to themselves and others about how they’re really doing the work. 

It just sounds so ambitious and blue collar and honest. Doing the work. 

The only problem with that phrase is, it presupposes that people have a productive definition of what work is. 

Because if their initial assumption is flawed, then any subsequent ambition is wasted. 

Like the person who has been unemployed for two years, but spends thirty hours a week on dating websites and having coffee with strangers, trying to find the perfect boyfriend. 

She very well may be doing the work. But it sounds more like stalling maneuver. Sounds like a person who is artfully creating constant distraction by piling on comfortable, arbitrary work that helps her avoid doing what matters most right now. 

Covey famously pointed this out in the bestselling business book in history:

If the ladder is not leaning against the right wall, then every step we take just gets us to the wrong place faster. 

Does that describe you or someone you know? Inventing spectacular ways to avoid doing the real work? 

If it does, it’s nothing to be ashamed about, merely aware of. Because once you accept that you’ve been putting off action to a day that never arrives, perhaps it will motivate you to redefine what doing the work really means.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
How will you break free of the mesmerizing forces that want you to avoid looking reality in the eye?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Saturday, June 08, 2019

No one gives it to you, you have to take it

Rodriguez’s memoir about the twenty something kid who became a major player in the film world reminds young artists of something important:

No matter how many people you drag in with you to create that safety in numbers feeling you’re going for, at some it’s going to be all up to you, and you need to be prepared for that. 

And not that teamwork and collaboration aren’t important and necessary for doing great projects. But we must be smart about advocating for ourselves. In fact, we might consider not factoring in anybody helping us at all. We should expect that people aren’t here to facilitate our work. And we should never wait around for some magical mentor to materialize on our doorstep to guide us into the promised land. 

At least, not in the early stages of our endeavor. 

Campbell’s myth of the hero’s journey comes to mind. In act one, when our protagonist commits to her quest, her mentor magically appears. This supernatural figure presents the hero with some kind of artifact like a ring or a necklace or a light saber or ruby slippers that will aid her later in the quest. 

This relationship makes for an amazing movie. And as audience members, it inspires hope in each of us that someday our mentor will come.

But let’s not idealize our own journey too much. Let’s not harbor the romantic expectation that we deserve to have our own personal mentor show up on our doorstep and send us on a journey of living happily ever after. 

It’s a goddamn lonely road, especially during the first few hundred miles. And if anyone is going to champion the powers that our unique organism brings into nature, it’s going to be us. 

Just start building it, don’t expect anyone to come, and see if you can find joy and satisfaction and meaning in that alone. 

That way, everything else that shows up will be an extra spoon of salsa on the enchilada. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What is it about your work that will allow great mentoring to happen?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Friday, June 07, 2019

A slim grasp on our sense of worthiness

Anytime we believe that we are broken, sinful and full of mistakes, we are operating from a core belief of unworthiness. 

And it’s simply not true. Because contrary to popular conditioning, we are not broken, and we do not need fixing. There is nothing wrong with us because there is nothing wrong. Wrongness and rightness, goodness and badness, these are all stories other people have sold to us. 

And so, if we want move from our condition of brokenness to wholeness, we must start by accepting where we are. We must work towards the realization that there is nothing to fix about ourselves. Whatever this bug is, whatever major malfunction we keep trying to get tech support for, it’s not a problem to be solved, it’s an experience to be savored. 

Just imagine how many calories we burn trying to fix things that aren’t even broken in the first place. We could power a small village in a third world country with that wasted energy. 

And besides, even if there was something wrong, which there isn’t, what do we think is going to happen once we’ve fixed it? Do we really believe that this little project will be enough for us and we’ll stop forever, or is this fixing another level down the codependent rabbit hole that we never come out of? 

Here’s an interesting question:

Who were we before we defined things as good or bad and right or wrong?

It’s probably hard to tell. Because that was a long time ago. But there was a point in our lives when our first impulse wasn’t to fix, save or treat ourselves. 

And now we finally have a chance to get back to that place. To drop our tool belts and stand firm in our own worthiness. 

You know, it’s funny, we’re always told that any relationship based on one person trying to fix the other is doomed to failure. And yet, we fail to apply the same logic to the relationship we have with ourselves. 

So say it with me. There is nothing wrong with you because there is nothing wrong. 

It’s all yours. Make yourself own that for a moment. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...

Where in your life are you running the sprinkler while it’s raining? 

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Thursday, June 06, 2019

I will not wrestle with every problem today


Most of us are highly impatient and don’t trust the natural rhythm of change. 

And so, we sometimes attempt to change too many things at once. Because that seems faster more efficient. 

Unfortunately, that amount of change can overwhelm us and backfire. Which leads to frustration, which leads to beating ourselves up for falling short, which leaves us worse than when we started off. 

It’s like the passionate but hurried person who tries to become healthier by eliminating meat, dairy, gluten, nuts and sugar from their diet, all in the same week. 

Their commitment is admirable, but it’s a lot at one time. And scientifically, it’s harder to discover symptom triggering foods with such a blanket approach. 

It reminds me of a mantra that helped build my trust in the natural rhythm of change. 

"You don’t need the whole world on the first day."

The impatient high achiever in me could have used that advice in college. And my twenties. And most of my thirties. 

Because my tendency is to take on the whole of my life’s problems all at once. To go on a quest to fix myself. 

When the reality is, some of my problems will be dealt with later, and some will solve themselves. 

For now, it’s best to just pick one and get to work. 

Easy does it. One bite at a time. That way, you might actually taste something. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...

Do you still believe solving all of your problems will automatically mean you’ll have what you want? 
* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Wednesday, June 05, 2019

Learning to reduce our dependence on foreign oil

In the modern workplace, there is nothing wrong with wanting to receive validation in exchange for talent. 

What team member doesn’t want to be told that they’re doing a great job? 

But there’s a balance. If we show up at the office each day with the expectation that our bosses will endow us with boundless reassurance and infinite hope, then a tsunami of disappointment is on the horizon. 

Ellis explores this experience is his book about overcoming resistance during therapy sessions. After forty years of sitting across the couch, he concluded that patients are not crazy for desiring to achieve their aims, but rather, for insisting that it is necessary that they achieve them. 

He says that the danger is when we escalate our normal wishes and preferences for feedback into absolutistic musts and demands for praise. 

This tendency plays out in the workplace on a daily basis. Especially for those of us who are people pleasing codependent nice guys who want nothing more than a seat at the grownup table, our interactions with bosses can play into our need to make daddy happy and feel like a good boy. 

We can become hyper agreeable, hanging the stability of our souls and the fullness of our hearts and constant positive reinforcement. 

Unless, of course, we learn to reduce our dependence on foreign oil. We grow beyond our need for kudos. And we trust that our sense of strength, efficacy and validation can be self generated. 

Yes, it still feels good when they stroke us, but it doesn’t make us any more whole than we already were. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...

Have you abandoned your frantic pursuit of an external object of validation?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Tuesday, June 04, 2019

Steal Scott's Ideas: The Card Game

Steal Scott's Ideas, is my new product development and innovation card game.

First it was a spreadsheet. Then some blog posts. Soon a series of corporate workshops. Later came the podcast.

And now there is a home edition.

 


This box was designed with a few questions in mind. 

First, how can we create shelf value? 

Let’s design this small box in a way that creates joy and intrigue for users before they even open the product. 

That’s why there are two bogus customer testimonials on each side. 


It’s hard to look away from a product like that. 

The second user experience question we asked during the design process was:

How can we make the packaging so entertaining, that even if people never opened the box to play the game, they would still feel like they got their money’s worth and be glad to own it? 

And that’s why the opposing side from the testimonials includes a series of absurd warnings. 


Who wouldn’t be proud to possess something like that? T

he final question we asked was:

What would most game creators never put on their box for fear that customers wouldn’t take them seriously? 

And so, on the top of my game, right below the logo, there’s a callout box that reads the following. 


Based on the hugely unpopular podcast and business book. 

Which is absolutely true. And also funny. Because if you want to make your audience smile, be radically honest when most people would say nothing. 

Overall, our user experience, our preshow efforts, so to speak, is what makes the game memorable and engaging. The package sets the stage for users. 

After a few seconds, users know exactly what kind of game this is. One that prides itself on its absurd unreality. 

The best part is, if the audience buys in through the experience of the box, they’ve given themselves permission to consider ridiculous, offensive or cruel ideas they might otherwise not accept while they play. 

Lesson learned, if you’re designing any kind of user experience, use the power of anticipation to frame people into the picture you want them to see. 

Only $50! To buy your copy, text me personally at 314/374-3397.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Are you a master of the choreography of attention?
* * * *
Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs