Saturday, April 27, 2019

You think you’re tough, but all you can do is break things

Henri’s book about the art spirit is an inspiration to any student of creativity. 

Especially when it comes to the precarious process of receiving feedback on our work. The famous painter says it perfectly in the first chapter. 

My opinions are presented as paintings hung on the wall, to be viewed at will and taken as rough sketches for what they are worth. 

That’s the way each of us should approach feedback. As sketches. As information that we hold onto lightly, if even at all. 

Because in too many situations, we get subjected to other people’s unsolicited opinions and advice. Too many cooks are in the kitchen trying to influence something, and the quality of the final product suffers as a result. 

And instead of elevating the work, it just feels like we’re getting pecked and chipped away at. Feelings of rejection and unworthiness and resentment spike through our veins. It makes us wonder why we even attempted the work in the first place. 

When the reality is, people’s feedback usually has nothing to do with us. It’s a performance. It’s a projection. It’s a way for scared people to contribute something without actually creating anything. 

And so, it’s our job to choose how much weight we grant to other people’s opinions. Which, outside of a few close confidants, should be very little. 

Because we trust ourselves. We trust our work. Feedback is overrated. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...

What do you want to create in the world, regardless of public opinion? 
* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

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