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Saturday, May 25, 2019

Complaining about the future will not stop it

The range of obstacles that stand in the way of unlocking our potential are vast. 

One of the big ones, if not the biggest, is mindset. 

Which is much more than just attitude. Mindset is the intention we hold when we relate to ourselves. It’s the language we use when we talk to ourselves. The posture we take when reflect on ourselves.

Complaining, for example, is a mindset. One that demonstrates a lack of power over our attitude. One that restricts access to our unrealized potential. 

Not that there’s anything wrong with feeling our anger and outrage at the absurdity and unfairness of life. But whining about something doesn’t make it go away. It doesn’t change what is. It merely sucks the air out of any new possibilities that might be available to us. 

Weiss observed it beautifully in his personal growth newsletter. He said that the inability of an animal to complain, sue, or file a grievance is a wonderful gift. Perhaps we should give more emphasis to our reptilian brain. 

Perhaps that’s the inherent problem with our species. We think too goddamn much. Most of us never suspend our critical minds long enough to even give our true potential free reign. We’re too busy saying no and making excuses and explaining why things won’t work and buckling into the vortex of poor me. 

That’s the question that part of me wants to ask people. 

Has that mindset every helped you solve anything? 

Probably not. 

Remember, our capabilities for great things will grow in proportion with the optimism, openness and ownership of our mindset. 

And so, let us keep our ears alert to the tone of our own complaining. Let us catch ourselves in every complaint we make. Let us honestly ask if our attitude is helpful or limiting. Let us take extreme responsibility for the attitude and energy we bring to the world. 

And let us curious about how our mindset might have helped create our problem or aggravate it. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What are the giants you need to slay to make your attitude what it needs to be?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Friday, May 24, 2019

In defense of being cheesy

My old ad agency boss despised all things cheesy. 

Any time our team sat down for a copy review, he would red line all of the messaging that was too cute, too clever, too corny or rhymed. 

Sadly, this pretty much eliminated all of my writing. Couldn't help myself. That style of creativity is my lifeblood. You don't wear a nametag every day for twenty years if you're not at least a little cheesy. Hell, I was born on valentine's day and I host a fake gameshow. Cheesy is my birthright. 

But somewhere along the line, we decided as a society that cheesy wasn't a compliment. 

The original definition of the word cheesy means overdramatic, clich├ęd, inauthentic. It comes from the root word which signals something that's cheap or inferior. In fact, the earliest use of the word in a negative way is from a novel in the mid eighteen hundreds, where the slang word was described as a vague term of depreciation, something hackneyed and lacking subtlety. 

In that respect, being cheesy isn't advisable. 

However, the evolution of our culture's distaste for this word is something different. 

There is now an entire generation of people who now use the word cheesy as a blanket description for anything that is earnest, sincere, joyful, romantic, sweet, loving, generous or optimistic. 

Like giving your coworker positive feedback. Or telling people you love them. Or crying while giving a speech. That's so cheesy. 

Or making puns. And singing pop songs out loud. Saying hello to coworkers when you arrive at the office. Also cheesy. 

But to me, anytime someone scoffs at things or behavior that they consider cheesy, what they're really announcing to the world is:

I'm disconnected from my feelings. I'm so out of touch with joy, and so uncomfortable and suspicious of anyone who openly loves themselves and others, that I have to spew my sarcastic bile all over it to alert everyone in spitting distance just how cool I am. 

After two decades of wearing a nametag for no reason other than to connect with new people, the most common criticism people give me is, wow, that's so cheesy. 

And my reply is always, of course it's cheesy. That's the whole point. Congratulations on being observant. 

My mentor wrote about this topic his bestselling book about positive attitude. Jeffrey opens with this disclaimer:

Throughout this book, I am going to share with you the quotes of other masters of attitude that have influenced me. And if you think they are cheesy, now would be a good time to give this book to somebody else. But keep tabs on who you give the book to. They'll be the ones who become successful later in life while you're still grumbling. 

Cheesy is valid. Cheesy means easy to read and easy to understand. 

Bottom line, if you think cheesy people aren't gouda or even grate, then cow dairy you. 



LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Which aspect of your personality makes people uncomfortable?


* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Going up the existential staircase

Sometimes life feels like you’re trying to go downstairs when everybody else is coming up. 

It’s as if the whole world is conspiring against your goals. Testing you with its angry, wild and resistive energy. And with every passing second, with every bead of flop sweat that trickles down your back, you feel more and more helpless to meet your own needs. 

Like abandoned flotsam on the currents of life. 

And instead of learning how to sort and dispose of what comes at you, there’s a part of you just wants throw up your hands, impotent in the face of nature’s energy, and let the undertow carry you away. 

Graves built an entire school of thought around this experience. His psychological theory of spiral dynamics held that most human beings were confined to the lower levels of existence where they were motivated by needs shared with other animals. And so, they suffered the pangs of existence in an endless struggle with unbridled lusts and a threatening universe. 

Pretty bleak. 

In fact, few things are more demoralizing than believing you’re running your life the wrong way and feeling helpless to change it. 

But he’s not wrong. Living from a place of existential scarcity serves nobody. 

But that resistance is just a story. It’s all inside our heads. And so, in the words of my favorite lead singer, let each of us be positively inebriated with life, be true to ourselves, spiral out, keep going and keep growing. May each of us confront that existential staircase as an upward spiral. 

Let each of us find footholds of faith despite life’s opposition. 

And may each of us call upon whatever reserves of resilience are left to hurl into the future. 


LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What will become surprisingly easier once you conquer your inner resistance?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Going home versus going big

Project is one of my favorite words in the dictionary. 

It derives from term proiectum, which literally translates as, something thrown forth. 

That’s inspiring to me. Because contrary to popular conditioning, it means that our projects don’t have to be these bloated, risky, overly ambitious, resource draining, revenue generating, achievement oriented endeavors. 

A project can simply be any activity that improves our personal value, regardless of outcome. It’s any pursuit that serves our meaning making efforts. And the best part is, it can be as big or as small as our life allows. 

One helpful question to ask along your project journey is:

How can you shrink the size of this project to fit your reality by keeping only the parts you love the most? 

This keeps labor intensity low and satisfaction high. It allows your projects to be chipped away at, on your own time, when you want to, not when you need to. And it reminds you that you only need to be ready to let go of all those things that aren’t you. 

Next time you feel social pressure to wake up at the crack of dawn and give one hundred and twenty percent every day until your project goes viral and starts a movement and changes the world and makes millions of dollars, try taking a breath first. 

Trust that going home is typically more relaxing, more fulfilling and more sustainable than going big. 

And throw something forth because it feels meaningful to you, not because people expect it of you. 


LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What project are you undertaking today in your life that you will be proud of ten years from now?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Steal Scott's Ideas -- Season Two!

We're under way with the second season of my product development and innovation gameshow!

Some new things to watch out for this year, including a guest scorekeeper role in various episodes, not to mention the home edition party card game, which will be available for sale this summer.


Here are the two most recent episodes for your listening enjoyment!





Episode 201: Life Without Good || Jacob, Eli, Dirk
What if communal ownership could help people grow? What if you give children speed in utero? What if accountants had their own dating app? What if children could be professionally abducted to learn their lesson?


Episode 202: Chads Begging For Change || Christian, Rosie, Rick
What if coworkers never tried to sell you crap at the office anymore? What if cat nostrils were the secret path to public sanitation? What if bros were placed in businesses that truly need them? What sorts of coughs occur below the waist? What if you sterilized all the stupid people who lived in Montana?

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
How many ideas have you thrown away this week?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg

That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

Monday, May 20, 2019

Dwelling in the house where there shall be no darkness

Our analysis of our mood very rarely relieves us of it. 

In fact, it usually makes things worse. Dwelling on how sad or lonely or uninspired we are, allowing our crappy mood to recruit more negative emotional energy, it’s a step in the wrong direction. 

What’s smarter is combining the art of benign neglect with the practice of making meaning. Here’s how it works. 

We acknowledge and accept and feel our feelings. But then, instead of demonizing them and creating unnecessary psychological fuel around them, we let them go. We liberate our life energy so we can attend to what really matters, which is our individual meaning making mission. 

Mine is written on piece of paper kept at my desk. It’s literally a living document that maps out a large repertoire of activities that are guaranteed to provide me with the experience of meaning. It’s my existential day planner. A micro blue print for fulfillment that inoculates me against any bad moods. 

If you find yourself wasting too much of your life force monitoring how bad you’re feeling, engage in this practice. Benign neglect, making meaning. 

Tons of new energy will soon be freed up for more life giving purposes. 

Taoist holy scripture sums it up perfectly. 

Because he does not dwell on it, nobody can ever take it away from him. 


LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What stupid little crusade do you need to put an end to?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Sunday, May 19, 2019

A trickle contributing to some greater plan

Arendt’s book on the human condition suggests that each of us has the opportunity to form a durable addition to the human artifice. That the same task, performed year in and year out, will eventually transform the wilderness into cultivated land. 

This approach of continuity, devotion and patience has always inspired me. Most people find it dreadful and monotonous and claustrophobic. 

But personally, the daily practice of commitment to seek what is fresh, spontaneous and interesting in the same place we looked for it yesterday, nothing could be more invigorating. 

Because there’s always a place we haven’t gone yet, always another facet of the work to be discovered. The work of building brick by brick toward the goal, translating small everyday increments into grand creative visions, trusting that you too have beautified and contributed to the world, that makes my nipples hard, man. 

The metamorphosis from wilderness to cultivated land. 

And the exciting part is, our inner topography changes too. 

As my mentor used to say, first you write the book, then the book writes you. 

It’s the spiritual version of the third law of physics. For every action in the material plane, there is an equal and opposite reaction in the spiritual plane. 

And so, whatever physical earth you’re tilling in the world, you can trust that the soil of the soul is cultivating as well. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Do you ever wonder what excuses you use to avoid the daily work?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Saturday, May 18, 2019

Bring your skepticism along for the ride

A blacklister is someone who tries to put an embargo on your joy. 

A hyper skeptical cynic who not only doesn’t like the things you like, but also judges you for liking the things you like. Simply because it’s not in their taste. 

Being around these people is exhausting and infuriating and makes my stomach hurt. Because you can always count on their sardonic commentary to ruin a good time. 

Like when they shoot down your ideas before you even finish explaining them. Or when they expertly dismantle your enthusiasm from a variety of angles. No matter what the topic is, they’re good for at least four or five scathing comments to tear apart everyone and everything in their path. 

And sadly, there’s no book on dealing with difficult people that can save you. Blacklisters take this art to a whole new level. And sometimes it feels impossible not to get sucked into their misery vortex They are immune to your consultations, to quote the great eighties pop song. 

The important thing to remember about interacting with these people is, it’s not personal. It’s not your fault. It’s not an attack on you or your character. And it is not something thing you need to fix or fight. 

Blacklisters treat everyone this way. Their negativity is a reflection of their chaotic inner state expressed externally. You just happen to be within the blast radius. Meanwhile, they’re sabotaging themselves in order to return to the more comfortable and familiar state of misery. 

Spezzano's book on heartbreak makes a radical suggestion. He says that when a person attacks, they do so because they are frightened, and they do not expect someone to move toward them. And so, we pour love into them as they are attacking. That way, both people move forward. 

Is it even possible? Can we truly loathe the behavior, but love the person? 

It’s certainly worth trying. To open our hearts to people in such a spacious and generous way, to use our imaginations to find things to love about them, even as they prove themselves to be sneering killjoy cock blockers, they’ll never see it coming. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Will you take the risk and leap into the unmapped, unsafe and unreliable territory where love lives?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Friday, May 17, 2019

A deeper darkness inside of me where worse monsters lived

Most tornado deaths are the result of flying debris. 

It’s not the twister itself that kills people, it’s all the giant shards of wood, chunks of metal and slabs of concrete that are swirling around at two hundred miles an hour. That’s what we really have to watch out for. 

Interestingly enough, our brains work in the same way. The tornado that is the human mind constantly churns out all kinds of irrational, bizarre and hostile thoughts. In fact, sometimes there is no darker place than our own mind. 

And yet, it is our guilt about those thoughts that is far more damaging than the thoughts themselves. It’s mental debris. The extra level of suffering we layer on top of our pain. 

For example, perhaps there is someone whom we wish pain or misfortune. Or a business competitor that we irrationally hate. Or even colleague that we sexually fantasize about in our private moments. That’s okay. These thoughts and feelings don’t make us sick and horrible people. They don’t signify that something is wrong with us. 

But there’s no reason to add an extra layer of debris by beating ourselves up for having them in the first place. 

As my therapist once told me, the movies inside our heads are badly written, poorly directed and cheaply produced. 

Next time you notice worrisome thoughts and feelings feeding into the stream, start by not making it worse for yourself. Accept that your thoughts have zero mass, and unless put into action, have zero force. They simply float away like weather patterns. 

Remember, nothing causes more emotional distress than the thoughts you think about the thoughts you think. 

Learn to manage the debris of your nagging mind. 

Reduce the cause of your own future suffering. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What kinds of things do you do to cope that actually make things worse in the long run?
* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Kill the hero in the first chapter

The reason you’re stuck creatively is not because your mind has run out of ideas. 

It’s because your mind is churning out too many thoughts veined with worry, and that’s clouding your sense of proportion and priority. 

Truth is, before you can even start cultivating your idea, you first have to navigate all of the mental debris that stand in the way of its fullest and truest expression. 

Mythology research calls this phase the first threshold on the road of trials. It’s the test. The proving ground. The initial obstacle that, when overcome, makes you stronger and prepares you for the final showdown. 

And it’s not purely physical. 

Psychologically, the road of trials is where the hero can transcend their destructive behavior patterns and thoughts. Campbell says that the departure into this land of trials represents the beginning of the long and really perilous path of initiatory conquests and moments of illumination. Dragons have now to be slain and surprising barriers passed, again and again. Meanwhile, there will be a multitude of preliminary victories, unretainable ecstasies and momentary glimpses of the wonderful land. 

And so, in your hero’s journey of creativity, here are a few characteristics of that first threshold. 

Instead of worrying about doing something right or wrong, you must focus on moving in a direction that makes sense. 

Instead of worrying about whether your efforts are good or bad, you must focus on what gives you energy and captures your imagination. 

Instead of worrying about people judging your work, you must focus on what you like about the process and what resonates with your soul. 

If you can pass through that essential mental threshold, you’re lightyears ahead of most on the road towards creative enlightenment. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Are you prepared to let go of unhealthy but comfortable patterns when you’re stuck?
* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Where so much of our growth takes root

Does this feel like a source of untapped potential? An uncomfortable place that we typically avoid? Perhaps a new dimension of ourselves that could present us the opportunity for growth and change? 

Perfect. That’s our edge. And we should lean into it like a heavy caliber rifle. Because that’s where all the wisdom lies. 

Masters outlined the characteristics of this sacred place in his book on true masculine power. He refers to our edge as the existential threshold where we allow the armoring around our heart to melt. It’s the developmental crucible and initiatory testing ground that demands our full blooded participation. 

The secret is being honest with ourselves about what an edge is not. Because whatever thing we’re doing, if it’s easy, if it’s asking nothing much from us, then it’s not our edge. If it’s not a significant challenge, if it doesn’t require courage, and if it doesn’t bring up resistance, then it’s not our edge. 

Which doesn’t mean that thing won’t have meaning, it’s just that it won’t be valuable door to our growth. 

We never get rewarded for doing what’s easy for us. 

Make sufficient effort to do the inner work that would result in real growth. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Where in your life are you rejecting growth? 

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

If you don’t tell anybody about it, it never happened

Here’s the most important thing you want people to remember about you. 

This isn’t all you do. You’re not a one trick pony. There are other arrows in your professional quiver. You have wealth of interesting instincts and skills that combine to form your arsenal of talents, each of which can create real value for real people. 

My mentor even had a mantra for this:

Everything you do should lead to something else you do. 

That was the skill layered on top of everything else. Leverage. Your ability to kill two stones with one bird. 

My publishing company launched a software program to help people do just that. It’s a strategic framework for increasing the rate of return on your personal assets. Simply by asking yourself pointed questions. 

For example, if you recently completed a new customer service initiative at a large company that has multiple departments and outside of your immediate team, you might ask yourself this. 

Who else needs to know about this? 

Meaning, which other employees, who might work in complimentary or adjacent or even perpendicular functions, could adapt your program to their team? Hunt them down. Surprise people with skills they didn’t know you had. Take the risk that you might make someone upset with your initiative. And before long, people will start seeking you out. 

Remember, nobody is standing in the way of your ability to create value. You are the only person preventing you from making full use of your talents and abilities. It’s time to start acting in a way that will make you a giver and not a taker. 

Because having passion for your work is not enough. You also must have perseverance in spreading the word about your work. 

If you don’t tell anybody about it, it never happened. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
How are you giving each of your talents a more prominent place in your work?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs

Monday, May 13, 2019

Blind to the very things that might make our careers more meaningful

What’s worse than an entrepreneur who is afraid of commitment? 

An entrepreneur who is living their lives to accommodate an outdated commitment because they’re afraid of contradiction. 

That was the stubborn siren song of my professional life for years:

Stick to your guns, shoot yourself in the foot, and then aim the gun at the other foot just so you have a matching set of holes. 

My career was the poster child for firearm regulation. 

From a small business standpoint, it’s understandable. It’s good for the brand. Commitment can make us feel like we have honor. It can make us feel like a special and noble professional who deserves to be congratulated on their idealism. 

But on the other hand, commitment can also make our work narrower and less flexible. Blind to the very things that might make our careers more meaningful, more satisfying and even more profitable. 

My mentor once told me that being religious about how we make our money is the quickest way to go out of business. And so, our responsibility as we progress in our careers is to adapt, evolve and recalibrate our commitments as time goes on. 

Here are a few key questions to ask yourself along the journey. 

Have you locked yourself into a lane that you will have a hard time getting out of? 

Are you so invested in your current strategy you have stopped thinking about other possibilities? 

Have you gotten so worked up thinking your approach is going to work that you can’t imagine it won’t? 

Are you so focused that you are unconscious to the opportunities to pivot to a game that has better odds for you? 

Do you limit yourself because you won’t accept the fact that you might be able to do something else? 

Remember, the commitment police aren’t going bang down your door if you decide change your mind. 

Duchemin once wrote that there is there is no prize for the one who leaves his canvas clean. 

Perhaps the same idea can be applied here. 

There is no prize for the one who never changes lanes. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What obsolete commitments might be trapping you?

* * * *

Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

It's the world's first, best and only product development and innovation gameshow!

Tune in and subscribe for a little execution in public.


Join our community of innovators, artists and entrepreneurs