Thursday, June 21, 2018

Developing a case of the humbles

Asking for help is hard, but accepting it is even harder. 

Especially when you’re the rebellious loner free spirit type. The kind of person who insists on doing everything as an expression of their individuality. Someone who reacts independently just to show the world that they won’t be ruled. 

That’s me in a nutshell. Growing up, I was never willing to accept ideas for change that weren’t my own. My default was to reject and shut out from sources of support. My pride balked at the thought of calling another person and asking for help. 

Even as an adult, it’s still a struggle. The need to figure out things on my own runs as deep as a buried fossil. And there’s no doubt that it holds me back. 

But as a friend of mine recently told me: 

If you’re not humble, you’re going to run out of people in this world that you can listen to. And that’s a lonely, scary place to be. 

The cool part is, once we finally set aside our silly cloak of pride that doesn’t fool anybody, we actually gain momentum. Because without the exhaustion of trying to accomplish everything on your own steam, without the burden of having to carry the full load anymore, we’re left with undirected kilowatts of energy to invest in the process of asking for, accepting and applying other people’s help. 

That’s when we taste the first fruits of progress. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...

Are you developing new behaviors that nurture your growth?

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Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


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