Monday, May 23, 2016

The technology of making an effective request

Asking makes us vulnerable. It means people can hurt us by denying us the things we want. And nobody likes giving others that much power over them. 

That’s why we back down from the task. We’re afraid to ask clearly, creatively and repeatedly for what we want. Is it any wonder why we’re unhappy? 

The reality is, and this is going to sound so obvious it’s stupid, asking improves our chances of receiving. Always. Even if the answer is no. 

In fact, a clearly worded request still moves things forward, even when it’s rejected. The experience of asking adds energy to the system. It’s velocity. It keeps the story moving forward. And it positions us in a better context from which to raise future requests. 

When I first launched my business, I had no choice but to master the technology of making an effective request. Because it was just me. No money, no experience, no knowledge and no connections. 

And so, I constantly asked for support in many forms. I decided what I wanted, believed I was worthy of receiving it, trusted that I could get it, and persisted until people helped me or called security. 

A humbling reminder, that success never comes unassisted. That it’s okay to enlist support. That we’re playing a small game if we’re only making the requests we think will be accepted. And that asking for help didn’t make us greedy or incompetent or in the debt of the helper

When will you let it be okay that you need other people?

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Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2016-2017.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!