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Thursday, April 30, 2015

Keep your eye on the ball and let your mind go

The inner commitment to expressing yourself can’t be learned. It’s not something you’re conscious of. It’s just there. And the strength of that commitment will govern the speed and potency with which you advance your goals. 

Philippe, the world’s greatest hire wire walker, writes in his book that that there is no such thing as motivation in his world. He is not motivated to do what he does. As an artist, he is driven, he is compelled, he is thrust forward by a force so rooted inside of him, so convincing, that is seems futile to try and explain it. 

That’s the magic of commitment. When somebody fully ensconces themselves in their chosen craft, traditional challenges are immaterial. These people don’t struggle with focus and motivation and belief and productivity and resistance and inspiration. They’re professionals. Commitment trumps all of that. 

I’m reminded of a marketing seminar I once attended. The instructor spent an hour teaching us strategies for influencing customer behavior through body language, neurolinguistic cues and ingratiation techniques. But then, at the end of the presentation, he explained that when you’re known by your name, you can violate all these norms. 

And I thought to myself, that seems like the smarter path. Why kill myself trying to perfect a collection of manipulative strategies when I could just focus on being interesting before I opened my mouth? 

If I could just commit to doing that everyday, I wouldn’t have to waste brain cells trying to figure out what to do. Because I would have already made my own decision and met my own standards. And I could just start with commitment, and let everything else fall in line. 

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Are you absurdly committed?
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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Start your workday practicing your job

I begin every day with a creative act. 

Entering into the place where I was most powerful, my own mind. 

And so, instead of checking email or reading the news or gluing myself to my phone first thing in the morning, I just start putting words on paper. Reflecting on my feelings, processing the night, organizing my idea inventory, updating my victory log, fleshing out new concepts I’m working on and picking up where I left off from the day before. 

That’s the first hour of my day. And there are myriad reasons why I adhere to that schedule is, but mostly, I don’t want to start off my day from a place of lack. 

That’s what noncreative activities do to the human brain. The whole world is based on making you feel bad about yourself so it can sell you things that will make you feel good about yourself. It wants nothing more than for you to wake up and immediately begin flooding your minds with outrage porn, living vicariously through and comparing yourself to others and seeking social validation through the infinite dopamine loop of the internet. 

Sorry, but I’m not interested in poisoning my brain with that kind of toxicity first thing in the morning. 

I wake up creating. I start my workday practicing my job. Those first sixty minutes are sacrosanct and nobody can take them away from me. 

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When was the last time you began your day with a creative act?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Expanding your sense of who you are

When I finished writing, producing, directing and scoring my first independent documentary, what I was most excited about was the opportunity to call myself a filmmaker. 

Even if my movie wasn’t the greatest thing since indoor plumbing, all that mattered was, after two years of hard work, I had finally earned the right to put that label after my name. 

That was deeply satisfying for me. Because there’s nothing I love more than adding a new meaningful facet to my identity. Strengthening my status as a multihyphenate. And not just to satisfy my ego needs, but also strategically as an entrepreneur. 

Being a multihyphenate creates more diverse options for employment, gives my name more vehicles for discovery, keeps me engaged with multiple projects simultaneously, leverages the entirety of my talents, raises my value so I can command a higher fees, and most importantly, creates a new context from which to relate to the world, one that affords me the freedom to try other approaches to success. 

It’s a choice every creator has to make. 

Do I hammer one nail all my life, or do I hammer lots of nails, one way, all my life? 

If we want to expand our sense of who we are, it’s best to choose the latter.

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How will your work evolve as the constellation of your identity expands?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Monday, April 27, 2015

Moments of Conception 170: The Planning Scene from Up In The Air

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.


And so, in this blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.


Today's clip comes from the planning scene in Up in the Air:




Stare into the mouth of panic and see possibility. The hard part about dreaming is, once your dream comes true, you have to learn to live with it. You have to exist in the world that you created. You actually have to do something with the idea that you killed yourself for. And it’s kind of a bittersweet symphony. Because the pride and joy and satisfaction of achievement is quickly replaced by the fear and vulnerability and pressure of reality. Just ask anyone who creates for a living. The moment you wrap on a new project, kick out the press release and announce to the world that your new brainchild has finally arrived, you’re immediately gripped with quiet panic. And you starting asking yourself these strange new questions. Are you sure you’re ready for the world to see you as you really are? What if you can’t afford to follow this dream anymore? What if you’re not the same person as you when the dream started? And if so, does that mean you have to readjust your dream so it reflects something that satisfies you when you step away from it? Campbell explained that the final stage of the hero’s journey was bringing the elixir back to the ordinary world. Turning back to help humanity along the difficult path that you yourself have just walked and conquered. But what if that’s not enough for you? What if you sense the beginning of a different and more courageous dream? It’s highly neurotic, but it’s also human nature. And nobody seems to want to talk about it. So we have to confront this reality. Because not facing the fire doesn’t put it out. Can you answer all the questions about your dream?

Create positive tension for yourself. When my wife and I decided to relocate across the country, I wrote a press release. Mainly because it was funny, but also because I didn’t want to lose momentum. I didn’t want another reason to back peddle on our dream. What’s interesting is, the moment we shared that press release with the world, plans started to align. Not because we earned a ton of headline impressions, but because we had created positive tension for ourselves. The press release painted us into an accountable corner. Not through distress, but eustress. Constructive conflict. Intensity through total involvement. That was our strategy to increase motivation, adaptation and reaction to the environment. And it worked. Within four short months, we had downsized, combined, relocating and restarted our lives. Best hundred bucks I ever spent. Proving, that when you lose momentum, self propulsion is the only thing that will move you forward. It’s like printing business cards for a company you haven’t started yet. That commitment device creates social pressure and positive tension. By virtue of physically handing them out to people, you’re forced to reckon with the infallible judgment of reality. A place with enough social pressure to make sure failure isn’t interpreted away. How could you increase your commitment by creating unacceptable consequences of failing?

Shake off the shackles of expectations. Natalie is overflowing with plans and ambitions and deadlines for her perfect life, complete with a perfect career, perfect community, perfect husband, perfect car and even a perfect dog. But she’s discovering that life can be wildly underwhelming. And that people will thwart your expectations every way you can imagine, and in many ways you can’t. This movie reminds me of my twenties, when I had enough goals to keep god busy. And I accomplished every one of them. But the strange part is, I wasn’t any happier. I just had a thicker resume. And so, I started to realize that I didn’t need a goal, I needed a process. A system. A set of practices I executed on a regular basis to increase my odds of happiness in the long run. As my favorite book states, only reasonable goal in life is maximizing your total lifetime experience of something called happiness. So I focused on that. And life got a lot happier. Because when you prioritize achievement over contentment, burdened by the belief that you haven’t done enough to be okay with yourself, happiness has a hard time bubbling to the surface. You have to roll an awful lot of rocks up an awful lot of hills, just to get a taste of that sweet air. But when the anxious part of you is finally resting, no longer suffocating under an avalanche of expectation, it's amazing how freely the vomit of happiness spews out. Lesson learned, goals are overrated, deadlines are jokes and plans are procrastination in disguise. What if you allowed themes to emerge in your life, rather than force your own expectations upon it?

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What did you learn from this movie clip?

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Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Sunday, April 26, 2015

Broken vessels aspiring to a lost wholeness

I once heard a startup founder say that the best way to get funding is to act as if you’ll never get it, and to make a plan that doesn’t need it. 

What a brilliant way to work. 

Why hang your sense of success, the fullness of your heart, and the stability of your soul on the fickle whims of external validation? Successful people don’t view themselves as passive organisms meant to be maneuvered by external forces and conditions, they attain an inner posture that finds its own equilibrium. They don’t wait around for a sugar daddy to greenlight their desires, they create a sense of self so complete that external influences have no authority within their consciousness. Because they know if they wait to be funded or rewarded or even recognized before they start doing the work, they will probably wait forever. 

And so, they trust that what they already have and who they already are is enough to get started. I’m reminded of a brilliant book I read about breakups, and how important it is to feel complete on your own. The authors advised heartbroken lovers to run headfirst into life. To project an image to their exes that says, look, despite the heartache and loss, the reason you’re not hearing from me is because I am too busy taking care of myself and moving on with my fabulous new life. 

That’s the kind of wholeness each of us should seek, in our businesses and in our lives.

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Which values give you a sense that your life is complete?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Saturday, April 25, 2015

The capacity for delayed gratification

Seinfeld once said that comedy takes a lot of talent, but an equal measure of temperament. 

It’s a fascinating insight that can be applied to many career paths. Because somebody might have the talent to do great work, but the real question is, do they have the discipline to continue working without seeing any results? 

That’s the line of demarcation between professionals and amateurs. The capacity for delayed gratification. Ask anyone who’s spent a few years trying to make a living by their wits, that path will cause them to tap reservoirs of strength and patience they didn’t even know they had. 

Having played music for more than twenty years, I was forced to develop my patience muscle early and often. But although it drove me up the wall as a kid, little did I know, that spirit of incrementalism would come in handy as an adult. 

Because now my job is create art on a daily basis, never knowing if I will get recognized for it or not, much less paid for it. 

And I’m perfectly at peace with that. I’ve trained myself to be okay winking in the dark, singing to the wall and writing into the ether, never convinced that the world is blind to my talents. It’s all part of the temperament that comes with the creative territory. 

And it’s not a prerequisite, but it certainly makes the slog more tolerable. 

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Are you seeking long term fulfillment or short term gratification?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Friday, April 24, 2015

Conserve your best energies for your creative efforts

There’s an inverse relationship between feedback and creation. 

I have an artist friend who said once she let go of how the world validated her art, she gained a tremendous sense of creative freedom, and that lifted a weight of expectation that allowed to start creating more. 

Hallelujah. 

Deciding to permanently affix your fingers into your ears is a breakthrough moment for any artist. Because let’s face it, feedback is completely overrated. It rarely bears any resemblance to your inner creative reality. 

Dilbert said it best when he suggested that constructive criticism was really just an uninformed opinion about things people don’t understand. I’m sure most creative people would agree. 

And so, next time you put something new into the world, instead of chewing up valuable time listening to confusing and disruptive feedback that you’re just to get defensive about and ultimately ignore, just move onto the next thing.

Aim for volume, not accuracy. Practice a little selective indifference. Be discerning enough not to dwell on meaningless matters. Conserve your best energies for your creative efforts. 

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If you weren’t still giving people’s opinions more weight than they deserved, what might you create?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Thursday, April 23, 2015

You don’t have to justify want

We’ve always been told that it’s easier to beg for forgiveness than ask for permission. 

But isn’t the ultimate freedom refusing to explain yourself to people? Isn’t the goal to get to a place where you don’t feel obligated to explain and excuse and defend and justify and apologize for everything you make? 

It’s such a colossal waste of energy. And the worst part is, it never makes you feel better. Backpedaling only makes things worse. 

I’m reminded of my favorite comedian, who unapologetically said that he only did comedy for himself. Carlin said the fact that his work involved other people was great. And that it amused them and gave him an income was great too. But he did it just to have a chance to sing his song. George actually used to come right out and tell his audiences, you’re here for me, I’m here for me, and nobody’s here for you. 

And people loved it. They just ate it up. His productive selfishness didn’t require explanation. 

Which only proves the point further, begging for forgiveness is wildly overrated. Enough with the disclaimers. Just do the work and move on. Any attempt to make grand claims about what the work is, what it’s supposed to do, why you deserved to make it or what people should think about it, is a waste of time. 

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How much of your energy is devoted to explaining yourself?

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For a copy of the list called, "7 Ways to Out Attract Your Competition," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Turn that story upside down

Manhattan is a city of achievers. 

People move here because it’s the place where things happen. Where the lights inspire you and the streets make you feel brand new, as the song goes. 

And so, everyone has an agenda. Everyone has eyes full of dreams. There are eight million centers of the universe scrambling around town, building their personal real estate, froggering their way to the front of the line, so obsessed with success that they barely smile. 

No wonder people walk so damn fast. 

What’s interesting is, I moved to this city with an uncommon posture. Prior to living here, I was already making things happen. I had already made a name for myself. I had already found a life companion with whom to do so. And that posture completely changed my experience of living here. 

Because once I let go of the need to prove myself, no longer gripped with quiet panic and tight anxious hands, I suddenly felt much lighter. Instead of running around making it all the time. I was just floating along blissfully despite the chaos around me, liberated from the burden of expectation. 

What a glorious relief. What a serene reminder. 

Turns out, we don’t have to buy into the narrative that every merchant of mass delusion tries to sell us. We can be intentional about doing it our own way.

As my mentor once told me, we can make the choice to turn that story upside down. 

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Are you willing to gamble on an unconventional life?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Moments of Conception 169: The Concert Scene from Greetings From Tim Buckley

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.


And so, in this blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.


Today's clip comes from the concert scene in Greetings From Tim Buckley:




To love at all is to be vulnerable.
Buckley possessed a tenor vocal range that ranged between three and a half to four octaves. And those natural endowments, mingled with massive amounts of courage and pain and tenderness, allowed him to sing with a soulful vulnerability that could make even the toughest man tremble. Few people could stand within his radius without being burned to a cinder. In fact, when I was in high school, I remember reading a review of his debut album. The critic wrote that the singer’s voice was the single most moving goddamn instrument he’d ever heard. What a compliment. What a way to be remembered. And, what a great reminder that when we’re courageously vulnerable, showing the more tender aspects of who we are through our work, we offer a gift to others. We deliver value that has never been delivered before. The scary part is wondering if our gift will be returned to sender, or, worse yet, not even opened in the first place. Yikes. Because this isn’t a blender, this is our soul. Poured out and served up on a silver platter. And the existential rejection of our gift being met with crickets is the most terrifying thing in the world. Powell, whose groundbreaking books on identity had a profound influence on me, wrote that I am afraid to tell you who I am because if I tell you who I am, you may not like who I am, and that’s all I have. No wonder disclosure is so difficult. Have you reclaimed your right to be vulnerable?


A place where your voice can take flight and travel. Jeff had the most ethereal falsetto voice in the history of rock and roll. Listening to his music as a teenager was a religious experience. And so, in the mid nineties, directly against the cultural backdrop of apathetic, angry grunge music and narcissistic, violent rap songs, his gentle, gender neutral stylings earned the world’s attention. Because nobody saw him coming. Buckley’s father may have been mainstream folk icon, but his son came through the side door and delivered catharsis. And he influenced an entire generation of singers. I was reading one of his old concert reviews, in which the critics says he sings like a man with more than a few exposed nerves, given to wild shifts in volume and hysteria, delivering messages of isolation, romance and other urban ailments to uncomfortable extremes. No wonder his debut album became the definite album of the decade. Because twenty years ago, nobody was singing like that. Nobody even had the guts to try and sing like that. Popular culture put too much of a premium on cool. Proving two things. First, that timing isn’t everything, it’s the only thing. And second, if you want to get to the next level, you have to break the rules. What alienates you from your true voice?


Study the anatomy of other people’s talent. Buckley transformed the way I sang. Listening to his records gave me permission to hit falsetto notes whenever possible. And not because it was popular, and not because girls liked it, but because it made me feel free. Like something was escaping. Like my soul was purging. Interestingly, I heard in an interview that he was emulating the vocals of another singer. Buckley credits his performance style to Nusrat. He said that that the first time he heard the man’s voice, he felt a rush of adrenaline in his chest, like he was on the edge of a cliff, wondering when he would jump and how well the ocean would catch him. Wow. So I started listening to that guy too. And the first time I heard the voice that influenced the voice that influenced my voice, my jaw dropped to the floor. It’s a surreal experience. Almost like you’re traveling back in time. Or trying on the head of your hero. Wild stuff. But it’s something every artist has a responsibility to do. To go to the source. To listen to the people who influenced the people who influenced them.  What do you and your role models have in common?


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What did you learn from this movie clip?

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For a copy of the list called, "11 Ways to Out-Market the Competition," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Monday, April 20, 2015

Steal Scott's Ideas, Issue 004: Ramental, Amigo Slice & Meow Rent

Ideas are free, execution is priceless.

That’s been my mantra since day one of starting my business.

It’s also the title of a book I wrote a few years back. You can download it for free here.

But here’s the problem. I'm an idea junkie. Everything I look at in the world breaks down into a collection of ideas. I have about fifty new ones every day, and sadly, I can only execute so many of them. Even if I had all the resources and all the time in the world, I still wouldn’t be able to keep up with the whirlwind of insanity that gusts through my brain.

And that’s where you come in.

I believe ideas were never meant to stay that way. And so, in this new blog series, I’m going to be publishing a sample of them on a weekly basis, in the hopes that they inspire you to (a) execute them, (b) improve them, or (c) invent something completely different.

Remember, once an idea springs into existence, it cannot be unthought.

Even if that idea is ridiculous.

Enjoy! 

Steal Scott's Ideas, Issue 004

1. Distractable, an audio program of white noise so performers can practice w/distractions .
2. Stickler, a food truck of only foods on sticks.
3. Recreative, a manual labor meditation for artists who hate sitting still, but need a break.
4. Ramental, a noodle bar whose waiters and bartenders are cognitive behavioral therapists
5. Sweat Equity, a crowd funding platform where people donate their time or talent.
6. Chirp, an alarm clock that identifies singing birds outside your bedroom window.
7. Amigo Slice, a guidebook for exorcising exhausting friends out of your life
8. Meow Rent, a sixty day cat rental service for mice infested apartments
9. Art Clock, a factory time clock and punch card system for blue collar minded artists.

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How will you turn these ideas into I-dids?

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For the list called, "49 Ways to become an Idea Powerhouse," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Every step forward pays a dividend

Louie once did an inspiring interview about his early work as a film director. 

His advice to young artists was, whatever project you’re working on, just start making it. Just give it a life

Which sounds rather simplistic, but the insight is actually quite accurate. Considering the current technological landscape, one in which creative resources are free and accessible to all, now anybody can do anything for nothing. Which means the only obstacle left is permission. 

And so, if you’re struggling to move forward on you idea, consider asking yourself a few questions. What psychological construct of notenoughness is holding you back? What is the story you’re telling yourself about why you don’t deserve to initiate your project? 

Once you’re willing to honestly work through those permissions, you can create the right environment for your work to begin. 

Personally, my obstacle was always youth. Having started my entrepreneurial journey at such a young age, I didn’t believe I had enough birthdays under my belt to say anything meaningful. And I bought into the maxim that it takes ten or more years of adult life to find something to say that tens of millions of people want to hear. 

But that’s simply not true. That’s just a story cynical old people tell to scare the off young. Ellis famously dubbed this cognitive distortion musterbation, a form of inflexible demand thinking where we obsessively tell ourselves that we must do things a certain way. Or in my case, not do things a certain way. 

The good news is, once I came to terms with the fact that age was nothing but a number, that it wasn’t the years but the mileage, execution ceased to be a problem. I just started making stuff. I just starting giving every project a life. Because that stupid little shoulder devil was no longer whispering words of notenoughness into my ear. 

LET ME ASK YA THIS...

What parts of your creative life are you not giving yourself permission to live fully?

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For a copy of the list called, "8 Ways to Out Google the Competition," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Saturday, April 18, 2015

The inexhaustible wellspring of power

As creators, we have to identify the truest form of our talents. We have to allow them to take shape and grow. We have to find worthy vehicles to take the full diversity of our talents on the ride they deserve. And we have to develop and nurture new talents to increase our value over time. 

But talent is not a panacea. It’s a commodity with a finite lifespan. What’s more important than talent are the renewable resources of commitment and discipline and creativity and resilience. Because the more we use them, the more we have. Each of us possesses an inexhaustible wellspring of power with which to increase those resources on a daily basis. 

And so, the majority of our training should be focused on contributing to our reserves of commitment, discipline, creativity and resilience. 

One of the smartest decisions I ever made as a songwriter was to start busking in public. I found the experience of performing music, in a public place, for complete strangers, for hours at a time, was a priceless training ground for contributing to my reserves. 

Showing up every weekend, regardless of temperature or temperament, developed my commitment. 

Practicing with constant distraction, from screaming children to barking dogs to urinating hobos, developed my discipline. 

Having a standing gig, one that locked me in writing new songs consistently, developed my creativity. 

Earnestly performing my own material, often out to rude people who treated me like I was invisible, developed my resilience. 

I’ll take that over memorizing pentatonic scales any day of the week.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...

How are you developing the intangible assets to buttress, multiply and leverage your talents?
LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For a copy of the list called, "157 Pieces of Contrarian Wisdom," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Friday, April 17, 2015

You don’t know what you have until you sleep with it

You can’t execute with one foot in the fantasy world and one foot in reality. Eventually, you have to cross the invisible line that separates thought from action. You have to shatter the glass wall in your mind that separates idea from execution. 

Maisel makes a powerful point in his creativity book that if you want to raise the stakes tremendously, it’s not enough to dream, you have to organize your life around that dream. Only through that brand of commitment can you build real momentum. 


One of my clients recently quit an office job to start her own business. Naturally, she was terrified. Because there was no guarantee that the entrepreneurial career path was profitable, probable or even possible for her. 


And so, I recommended she spend two months acting as if she was fully committed. Not merely dipping her toe in the water, but diving completely into to her enterprise, treating the business as a full time gig, even paying herself a modest salary from her savings, just to feel what it felt like to work for herself. Just to see what she could accomplish in sixty days if she committed whole hog.


Then, once the trial period was over, she could make her career decision from a more informed place. It was a tough gift to give herself, but it’s exactly what she needed to discover what was possible for her. 


Proving, that you don’t know what you have until you sleep with it. 


The flesh doesn’t lie.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...

What experiment could you run to see if you’re committed or merely interested?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For a copy of the list called, "37 Things Not to Do This Year," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Inventor. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter.  
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.

Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!