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Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Moments of Conception 147 -- The Dreaming Scene from Rudy

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.


And so, in this blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.


Today's clip comes from the dreaming scene in Rudy:



What can we learn?


Living like you used to dream. Pete says having dreams is what makes life tolerable. Beautiful. What he didn’t mention, however, is that most people only get to dream their dream. Few people are lucky enough to actually live their dream. And so, there’s a certain amount of empathy required. Because when people start warning you to test your dreams in the crucible of reality, imploring you to step out of wonderland and expose your dream to the light, begging you to submit yourself to the occasional beating by the practicality stick, it’s not necessarily malicious. And a little resistance doesn’t mean the world is conspiring to keep you from your dreams. They’re just projecting their own shit onto you. That’s the power dynamic. People are invested in keeping you where you are. At some level, they don’t like to see you pursuing their dreams. It’s disenfranchising. It reminds them how far they are from living their own. I’m reminded of an article I read about one man’s disenchanting experience of trying to make it as an artist in a major metropolitan area. The author said the city was like a giant meat grinder extruding tons of chewed up dreams. And that made me sad. Because the goal is to live like you used to dream, not the other way around. Have you let go of the dream you killed yourself for?


Dream with a pen in your hand. Every dream that anyone has ever achieved came true because they were dedicated to a process. Not because they dreamed and believed it so much that eventually the dream had no choice but to become a reality. But because they had a plan. They took steps, every day, that added energy to the system and moved the story forward. Even if that step was stupid. Because what mattered was that the step was one more tool to get them closer to their dream. What mattered was that they never allowed their commitment to be outweighed by their fear of looking like an idiot. What mattered was that at the end of the day, they put their head on the pillow and experienced the glorious satisfaction of creative overextension, the divine feeling of being flattened tired from working on their wildest dreams. And that they woke up in the morning energized by their work, dreaming of how to take it to the next level. That’s something I never understood. Pursuing your dreams doesn’t equal financial irresponsibility. Not if you have a system. Not if you use creativity to help you overcome new barriers to your dream. Not if you act on your dreams with open eyes. Over the years as a writer, I’ve worked jobs selling furniture, parking cars, even a full time job developing strategy at a marketing agency. Because I never wanted a reason to believe that I couldn’t afford to follow my dreams anymore. Are you blocking your dreams with the excuse that you can’t afford to accomplish them?


Reality may be hazardous to your health. The beauty of dreaming is, it delivers us from the rational surface of life. It floods our consciousness with wonder and mystery and possibility and whimsy. And that’s an experience that no human should be deprived of. Because there’s no upside to not dreaming. Even if the world looks at us like we’re mental. Even if our dream has no intention of coming true. We can’t let society’s security blanket of practicality squelch our most imaginative yearnings. Because what happens to people is, once their first dreams get killed off, nothing takes their place. And that’s no way to live. Einstein famously said a mind that opens itself to a new idea never returns to its original size. Dreams work in a similar way. Simply by engaging in the process of dreaming, the experience of envisioning a world even more beautiful than the one we’ve come to know, our imaginations expand. They never return to their original size. And that trains our brains to spot the beginnings of different and more courageous dreams. Rudy harbored dreams of playing college football, despite lacking the grades, finances, athletic talent and physical stature required. But although he only logged three actual plays on the field, that wasn’t the end of his dream. Ruettiger also went on to create a myriad of charitable ventures, authored several books and became a sought after corporate trainer and motivational speaker. Football was just the gateway dream. Now he breathes life and hope into the dreams of others. What dream in you that serves or helps other would cause you deep regret if you never took the risk to go for it?


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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com


Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Outsource the heavy lifting

Deciding what we want is the most important work we will ever do. 

Unfortunately, it’s also the most difficult work we will ever do. Commitment, after all, is a scary moment. It means the death of other choices. It means the risk of failure and rejection and embarrassment. 

And so, any time we have to act with decisiveness, it’s helpful to make the process of deciding less intimidating. One of my clients needed to create a logo for her new brand. But since it was her first time starting a business, she had no idea where to begin. And the weight of possibility was starting to overwhelm and paralyze her. 

My suggestion was to make the decision making process easier on herself by reverse engineering her desire. By entering through the back door. For less than twenty dollars, for example, she could contract three illustrators from a micro freelancing website to quickly and cheaply mock up logo designs for her. And from those prototypes, she could figure out what she wanted through the process of elimination. 

That’s the benefit of paper. Attempting to physically draw out an idea automatically surfaces its weaknesses and complexities. It shows you what’s wrong with your thinking and what’s right with it. And it brings your idea to life in a way that thinking about it can’t. 

My client tried this approach, and she found that it significantly lowered the threat level of her logo design. Ultimately, by outsourcing the heavy lifting of that decision to a third party, she was able to focus her energies on more important tasks. 

Proving, once again, that decisiveness is the antidote to a lifetime of misery. 

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Monday, December 29, 2014

Tunnel of Love -- Chapter 14: Home is the Place (2014) -- Scott Ginsberg Concert Documentary

Tunnel of Love is a feature length concert documentary written, produced, directed and scored by Scott Ginsberg. The film explores the intersection of identity, belonging and creativity. Through live performances, playful and romantic exchanges, unexpected creative moments of conception and behind the scenes storytelling, Ginsberg’s film takes you on a heartfelt journey about what it means to be an artist, a romantic and an opportunist.

Watch the trailer. Meet the creators. Go behind the scenes. See the episode schedule. Download the discussion guide.

Tunnel of Love will be presented as a serialized, episodic documentary. The movie’s centerpiece is a live concert, so I’m premiering each song as a stand alone chapter. There are 14 songs in the concert, so the distribution timeline will occur over a period of 14 weeks, from September to December 2014.

Here's chapter fourteen:




HOME IS THE PLACE
Home is the place where my soul rests
Where I am rooted and not diluted 
Where I feel respect 

Home where I’m met with accepting eyes 
Where I am welcomed with wanting arms 
Where I let the blood dry 

Home is the place that remembers me 
Where all the mirrors undress the fears
Where I feel pretty

Home, where I meet new sins
And the old ones I forget 

Home is the place where my ship wrecks 
Where all my bosses are not my crosses 
Breathing down my neck

Home where I remember what 
Who I was before you said I’m not enough


* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
www.nametagscott.com
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!


Sunday, December 28, 2014

Make a mental leap into the immediate future

Carlin once said that when we let go of the attachment to goals, good things start to come to us. 

It’s an interesting take on the law of polarity, whereby any over determined action produces its exact opposite. The less we care, the better we do. When we expect nothing, we receive everything. 

And yet, there’s still value in the experience of setting goals. Because once we announce, even to ourselves, that we seek something, we create positive tension. We exist in two places at the same time, both where we are, and where we want to be. Part of our brain is in the future, and part of our brain is be in the present. And that positive tension propels us forward. 

At the end of each year, one of my favorite rituals is to make a list of a hundred goals for the following year. Not because I literally believe I’m going to achieve all of them, but because I love the experience of dreaming and wondering about what’s possible. I enjoy telling myself a story about the future I want to see. It existentially resonates for me. 

Setting one hundred goals, even if I’m not attached to their outcomes, gives me a chance to deep dive into my intuition and catch a snapshot of the life that’s always been waiting for me. To grow the emotional willingness to open myself to new possibilities. Because with every new goal that I write down, I hear the door to my future opening a little bit more. 

Besides, what else can the future give us if we’ve already got all that our imagination has dreamt up for us? 

Setting goals is, if anything, a chance to think progressively towards ourselves. To create an emotional environment of unlimited possibility, rather than inherited options. And to help ourselves believe that something bigger is possible for us. 

I challenge you to make a mental leap into the immediate future. Try making a list of one hundred goals. Because as the futurist manifesto states, the future is only dark from the outside, leap into it and it explodes with light. 

Engage in possibility for its own sake.

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Have you made your list of 100 goals for 2015?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Learn to breathe in help

It’s a scary moment when you decide to bring someone into your dream. 

Because as much as you value their support, part of you is afraid to burden them with your desires and overwhelm them with your anxieties and disrupt the economy of the relationship by constantly injecting your dream into every conversation. 

And that’s a normal fear. Nobody wants to be a monopolizer. Nobody wants to have a poor division of relational labor. That’s where resentment lives. 

But success never comes unassisted. And if you have any intention of turning your dream into a reality, you have to breathe in help. You have to ask people to be there for you. 

The surprising part is, people actually love it. Especially the ones closest to you. They crave nothing more than the opportunity to show up for someone they care about. That human longing to be useful, to be asked, to feel necessary to at least one other person in the world, it runs deeper than anything else. 

Besides, at least you’re fortunate enough to have someone in your life to share your dream with. Imagine not having someone at all. Or worse yet, having someone, but it's someone who doesn’t give a shit about your dream. 

The point is, if you’re fortunate enough to have a savings account of human healing, don’t feel guilty about making a withdrawal request. 

Just make sure to keep an eye on the balance. 

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Can a dream have more than one owner?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Saturday, December 27, 2014

All we hear are crickets and wind

Every time I launch my latest big idea into the world, there’s a part of me that thinks to myself, okay man, this is the greatest thing that ever was, and it’s going to get traction and achieve instant success and be so huge that it’s going to break the internet. 

Always the optimist. 

However, as much as I want the external world to submit to my internal demands, the truth is, reality is under no such obligation to care about my work. The world isn’t anxiously awaiting for the opportunity to facilitate me. 

And so, when I hold my breath and hit the publish button, and then all I hear are crickets and wind, I’m never really that surprised. Maybe a little disappointed that it didn’t open big, but never shocked. I’ve been in the game long enough to know that it will probably be a long time before what I do catches on. 

When I give speeches to business owners, I challenge them not to care if things don’t break immediately. To let their work grow quietly in the dark, slowly building momentum in places where they’re less visible, and trusting that when the big wave comes along, their surfboard will be in position to ride. 

It’s a demanding pill to swallow. It takes equal parts humility, detachment and faith. But it’s still the best insurance against the inevitable disappointment of putting your name on something and putting it out into the world. 

The question, as always, is whether or not you'll still be around when the world is finally ready for you. 

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What goals will your capacity for delayed gratification make possible?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Friday, December 26, 2014

Moments of Conception 146 -- The Busking Scene from August Rush

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.


And so, in this blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.


Today's clip comes from the busking scene in August Rush:



What can we learn?


Try giving yourself away. My career has flourished on the power of giving myself away. Through reckless generosity and a promiscuous heart, I’ve always treated the bulk of my work as a gift. As an offering to the marketplace. As a loving impulse of emotional labor that signals to the world, there’s plenty more where that came from. This strategy, if you can even call it a strategy, hasn’t failed me yet. Because it comes from a place of abundance and love and connection. In fact, the concept of giving yourself away began as an anonymously written article in a business magazine nearly a hundred years ago. And due to its popularity and volume of reprint requests, the piece was later expanded into a bestselling book, which became an inspiration to millions. Myself included. And so, when it came time to decide on a distribution strategy for my documentary, there was never really any question. Of course I’m going to give the entire movie away. Of course I’m going to stream the whole thing on my website for free. Of course I’m going to adopt the direct to consumer channel. Because anything that’s a barrier to getting my work in people’s hands is a problem. And since most of the independent documentaries that premiere each year never even see the light of day anyway, much less secure theatrical distribution or achieve commercial success, I see no reason to exhaust and expense myself in the process. Middleman, schmiddleman. Are you keeping your giving away machinery in good working order?

Money is flowing into my life from all directions. When I first started busking, I refused to open up my guitar case for donations. My foolish pride and suburban ego simply wouldn’t allow me to accept tips from strangers. But after a few weeks of playing, I realized a few things. First of all, it’s not about making money, it’s about making a connection. Because every interaction is a relationship. Regardless of how long it lasts, I’m still relating to the other person. And so, every time a stranger drops change into my case, it’s like they’re saying, I like you. That makes me feel seen. And whether people give a dollar or a dime, no amount of money is insignificant. I’m learning to find joy from whatever people have to offer. The other thing is, tips are totems of an abundance mentality. They’re reminders than money matters to me, that money is always flowing into my life from all directions and that I should train myself to spot money whenever it presents itself. In fact, since I’m streaming my documentary for free on my website, I decided to recreate the open guitar case online. I created a donation page, almost like a digital tip jar. And if people find joy and value and inspiration in the movie, they can show their appreciation by dropping a dollar. Ultimately, it’s been a transformative experience. A reminder that there is no prosperity without the willingness to receive. Because the answer to every question you don’t ask is no. What is blocking your ability to receive?

Your gift is not fully yours until it is given away. Nietzsche once said those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music. What a perfect sentiment to summarize the experience of busking. Because when you perform in public, you learn that not everybody will like your art. In fact, not everybody will even acknowledge the fact that you’re there. Most will just walk by as if you weren’t standing there naked, breaking yourself open and pouring yourself out. And it’s painful. It makes you feel invisible. It insults your soul. But you can’t let it phase you. You can’t allow the uncompromising forces of reality to crush your dream. Because job number one is not to please everybody who walks by, job number one is to create an exhibition of love through your art. To find the best that is within you and let her rip. The ones who don’t get joke and can’t hear the music, they’re not your people. So just keep playing. Whether you’re performing on the streets for change or producing on the internet to create change, just keep playing. Stick around long enough and continue to be yourself until the right people find you. And when the world is finally ready for you, all you have to do is say yes. What’s the one thing, if practiced consistently, would make the biggest impact on your life?

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What did you learn from this movie clip?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
www.nametagscott.com
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Thursday, December 25, 2014

Locating your sense of rhythm

Emerson notoriously said that nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm. 

He was right. Enthusiasm is that rare force that grows on its own and builds on itself and provides us with the momentum we need to take massive action on our endeavors. 

But what our transcendentalist friend failed to mention was, an overabundance of enthusiasm can work in reverse. It can retard our progress. 

Consider the neophyte entrepreneur. He starts his business on credit cards, adrenaline and naiveté. The vomit of excitement that spews out of him is nearly uncontrollable. He feels alive in ways he’s never been before. And he’s ready to get to work changing the world. 

The only problem is, his entrepreneurial eyes are bigger than his stomach. He wants this idea to fly so badly that he tapes wings to it. And so, impatient within his dream, he tries to accomplish everything in the first week. 

Woops. 

Then again, what do we expect? Each one of us would do the same. It’s a defense mechanism. When we come up come up against something massive and overwhelming like starting a business or launching an initiative, it’s easy to immediately exhaust our resources and resolve in the process. 

We haven’t honed our sense of pace yet. We haven’t yet learned how to pull back on the reins of our enthusiasm. 

But that comes with time. Like a guitar player training his strumming hand, eventually, we all locate our sense of rhythm. 

Until then, we just have to make sure we don’t mess something up because we want it too much. 

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How can you contribute to your reserve of patience?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Moments of Conception 145 -- The Monetization Scene from The Social Network

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.


And so, in this blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.


Today's clip comes from the final scene in The Social Network:



What can we learn?


Romanticize first, monetize second. Money is the great legitimizer. When your enterprise starts turning a profit, the world starts taking your work seriously. But be careful not to be tempted to monetize too early. Seeking money from the wrong part of the value chain can thwart you early on. If you clutter your blog with advertising in its first year of publication, for example, you risk turning your website an eyesore that alienates users. What’s more, having an immediate focus on monetization can distract you from more important goals like growth and attention and trust and connection. Those are the currencies that matter most. Because this is a long arc game. Winners get rich slowly. Building an online legacy that increases in value daily is more important than earning fifty dollars a month from the first advertiser that says yes to you. Becoming the best in the world at something that people value is a far better use of your time than knocking on doors trying to find sponsors. And creating a durable community and defining a new set of meaningful behaviors in the world is more important than turning a profit in the first six months. I reminded of an interview with the president of a large software company, who said the easiest way to get a million people to pay for non scarcity product may be to make a hundred million people fall in love with it. That’s not monetizing, that’s romanticizing. What if you deferred monetization until you were truly ready?


Possessed by a prosperous heart. Allowing the grip of scarcity to squeeze your heart is not good for business. If you want to open up a parachute of prosperity, you have to be ready for the money that is waiting for you. Years ago, I made a crucial shift in my financial mindset. I began to look at what I wanted rather than what I didn’t have or why I thought I couldn’t have it. I even practiced an assortment of affirmations, incantations, mantras and cognitive reframing tools to shift my mental perspective about money. And what I noticed was, the common denominator among these strategies was trust. Trusting that there’s tons of money if you’re good and want to take it. Trusting that money finds a home only in places where it’s appreciated. Trusting that if your creative project has real substance, ultimately the money will follow you. And trusting that you can find a niche where money flows as a regular consequence of the success of your idea. Because you become what you expect. When your trust yourself, you prove yourself right. When you believe in the availability of your own earning potential, it shows up. It’s not magic, it’s expectation. It’s a psychological primer for future performance. You announce to yourself that you are well equipped with sufficient internal assets to earn money from your work. How much longer can you wait for overwhelming evidence to trust yourself?


Money forgets but god remembers. Eduardo said it was time to start making money. Zuckerberg said he was against selling advertising. Parker, however, knew best. He said that selling advertising too early was like throwing the greatest party on campus, but telling people it had to be over by eleven. And that’s the lesson. Facebook’s creators didn’t know what the product was, what it could be, or what it would be, but they did know one thing. It was cool. And that was a priceless asset they weren’t giving up. I’m reminded of another great interview with the president of a renowned venture capital firm. The question he encourages entrepreneurs to ask is, is there a new behavior here that you can see one hundred million people doing? If so, and if people are growing more and more engaged and committed over time, can you monetize their behaviors in a meaningful way later. Because the best growth of a product, he says, happens when someone is using a product so actively, they tell all their friends about it and try to drag them into it. And so, money is more incidental as it is intentional. Money isn't the target, money is the reward you get for hitting it. What can you build to deserve money from other people?


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What did you learn from this movie clip?

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For a copy of the list called, "33 Ways to Approach Unhappy Customers," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
www.nametagscott.com
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Imagination is a neutral construct

I was reading a book about the creative process of a world famous performance artist. Philippe explained that those who want to achieve something find a way, but those who do not, find an excuse.

I remember thinking to myself, wow, that’s the real energy crisis on this planet. Our complete misappropriation of imagination. Our addiction to complaining and justifying and catastrophizing and blaming, all of which are gross misuses of brainpower. Mental calories burned on treadmills that lead to nowhere.

It breaks my heart. If people would put half as much creativity into their dreams as they put into their excuses, our global happiness index would triple. Productivity would skyrocket. 

Imagination, after all, is a neutral construct. It’s like tofu. It takes on the shape of whatever container it’s cooked in. 

And so, we can use our imaginations to craft elaborate personal narratives about how the cruel world is orchestrating the ideal conditions to prevent us from reaching our goal, or we can use our imaginations to map out action strategies that are so comprehensive and ambitious, that our dreams have no choice but to come true. 

It’s all in the appropriation. 

When entrepreneurs rent my brain to strategize about business growth, I literally require them to write list of all the toxic mental activities that aren’t worth their imagination. 

It’s a liberating exercise. And, it helps you build a filter for daily decision making. Because you start asking yourself, wait, why should I spent significant bandwidth on this when I could be spending time and mental energy creating new ideas about what I think the world can be? Better to direct your efforts into the work of creating a better reality than to waste your resources raging against an unjust fate. 

That’s smart energy management. And it’s the difference maker between success and failure.

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What lies are your excuses guarding?

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* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com
www.nametagscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Monday, December 22, 2014

Tunnel of Love -- Chapter 13: Sweet Somethings (2014) -- Scott Ginsberg Concert Documentary

Tunnel of Love is a feature length concert documentary written, produced, directed and scored by Scott Ginsberg. The film explores the intersection of identity, belonging and creativity. Through live performances, playful and romantic exchanges, unexpected creative moments of conception and behind the scenes storytelling, Ginsberg’s film takes you on a heartfelt journey about what it means to be an artist, a romantic and an opportunist.

Watch the trailer. Meet the creators. Go behind the scenes. See the episode schedule. Download the discussion guide.

Tunnel of Love will be presented as a serialized, episodic documentary. The movie’s centerpiece is a live concert, so I’m premiering each song as a stand alone chapter. There are 14 songs in the concert, so the distribution timeline will occur over a period of 14 weeks, from September to December 2014.

Here's chapter thirteen:



SWEET SOMETHINGSPay ourselves in hope till silver crosses our palms
Take this poverty of vow
Squinting at the mirror just to see if it’s safe
It’s the stain that won’t wash out

Sweet, sweet somethings I
Repeat on this salty night
Sweet, sweet somethings I
Repeat on this salty night

Hanging all our fortunes not on chance
Making friends before we make requests
And we will go and eat the world if we can
To feed this starving artist bent

Set our palms against the stone
These two hearts are not alone
Protect us from what we want
All them statues shooting up
* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
www.nametagscott.com
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2015-2016.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!