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Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Can busking under a tunnel change your identity?

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Award winning writer, performer and nametag expert premieres a concert documentary that sticks.

Scott Ginsberg made a name for himself wearing a nametag twenty-four seven. He built a brand, a business and a career as an author, professional speaker and business strategist. But after fifteen years, he decided to branch out into an entirely new medium of creative expression.

I’ll never forget the first time I strolled through the tunnel under the historic Meadowport Arch in Prospect Park, Brooklyn. The aesthetics were inspiring, the architecture was stunning and the acoustics were shattering. There was no way I wasn’t coming back with my guitar. And after a few months of busking, there was no way I wasn’t coming back with a production crew.” 

When in doubt, hire yourself
Ginsberg wasn’t waiting around for somebody to greenlight his creativity. He didn’t have to ask permission to innovate. He simply took advantage of the invaluable production value and decided to make a documentary about the transformative power of performing in the tunnel. Tunnel of Love: Songs, Stories, Sermons & Scenesis a feature length concert documentary written, produced, directed and scored by Scott Ginsberg. The film explores the intersection of identity, belonging and creativity. The movie takes a look at the transformative power of live music, both on the audience and the performer. It pays homage the sonic potential of natural acoustics. And it’s a playful narrative about two young lovers in the process of changing their pronouns. Through live performances, playful and romantic exchanges, unexpected creative moments of conception and behind the scenes storytelling, Ginsberg’s film takes you on a heartfelt journey about what it means to be an artist, a romantic and an opportunist.

Don’t be stopped by not knowing how
Scott, however, had zero experience writing, producing, directing, scoring and funding an independent film. But that didn’t stop him. Because if there’s one thing he does have experience with, it’s undertaking creative projects in which he has no idea what they hell he’s doing. Scott partnered with Emmett Williams of Mission Man Media, an award winning artist, internationally known musician and nationally exhibited photographer. He served as director of photographer, editor and overall production manager. He used Elance to find local audio technician, Jared Alder, to engineer the sound for the film and produce original motion picture soundtrack, which was released as a stand alone album.  



Screen Shot 2014-09-28 at 7.54.04 PM










What happens inside the tunnel of love? Kids biking. Families picnicking. Tourists dancing. Friends singing. Couples dancing. Family clapping. Babies crying. Teenagers yelling. Police patrolling. Birds chirping. Balloons popping. Dogs barking.

Adopt the direct to consumer channel Tunnel of Love will be initially presented as a serialized, episodic documentary. Since the movie’s centerpiece is a live concert, Scott is premiering each song as a stand alone chapter on his website and social channels. There are 14 songs in the concert, so the distribution timeline will occur over a period of 14 weeks, from September to December. Every Monday, fans will get a new song emailed to their inbox. And by the end of the year, the entire movie will become available online for free, forever. Ginsberg, who writes books and conducts seminars about the digital revolution, says the direct to consumer era and the infinite shelf space of the internet have changed everything for creators and entrepreneurs. When it came time to decide on a distribution strategy for his documentary, there was never really a question: 


Of course I was going to give the entire movie away. Of course I was going to stream the whole thing on my website for free. Of course I was going to adopt the direct to consumer channel. Anything that’s a barrier to getting my work in people’s hands is a problem. Most of the world’s independent documentaries that premiere each year never even see the light of day anyway, much less secure theatrical distribution or achieve commercial success, so I see no reason to exhaust and expense myself in the process. Middleman, schmiddleman.”

But the film isn’t a complete vanity project, Scott laughs. The documentary homepage also offers discussion guides and curricula for educators, learning institutions, companies, congregations and other organizations to help spread the messages of identity, belonging and creativity.

Screen Shot 2014-09-28 at 8.06.33 PM


“I wanted Tunnel of Love to be more than just a movie, but also a platform for education and connection. Because strategically, I’m always searching for new ways to deliver my unique value to society. So I trust that the offering of these educational materials, free of charge, will lead to some exciting new opportunities.” 


Call to Action
Can we interest you in a feature story, an interview with Scott Ginsberg or a review of his new documentary? For those who might be wonder about how to overcome the challenges of identity, belonging and creativity, Scott's movie offers up the smartest answers to the toughest questions that plague all of us. If you'd like to watch his full movie, please contact below. Media review copies, high resolution photos and interviews available upon request. This article may be used in whole or part, with short bio and links to website please. Special feature story inquiries and blog posts welcome. Email questionnaires, permission to use excerpts or fresh articles available to meet your needs. Fire away and let Scott know how he can help you!

Quotes from Scott Ginsberg


“The only artistic goal worth pursuing is freedom, and that everything else flows from there.”


 “Put whimsy on wheels. Give yourself permission to follow ridiculous ideas to fruition.”

“Generosity is the tax you pay for talent. If you’ve been given a gift, you have an obligation to share it. To regift it so it brings joy to others. Anything less is an act of ingratitude.”


“Every interaction is a relationship. Regardless of how long it lasts, you’re still relating to the other person. Belonging is about learning to find joy from whatever people have to offer.”


Learn more at www.tunneloflovedoc.com.


#  #  #

Monday, September 29, 2014

Tunnel of Love -- Chapter 1: Alibi (2014) -- Scott Ginsberg Concert Documentary

Tunnel of Love is a feature length concert documentary written, produced, directed and scored by Scott Ginsberg. The film explores the intersection of identity, belonging and creativity. Through live performances, playful and romantic exchanges, unexpected creative moments of conception and behind the scenes storytelling, Ginsberg’s film takes you on a heartfelt journey about what it means to be an artist, a romantic and an opportunist.

Watch the trailer. Meet the creators. Go behind the scenes. See the episode scheduleDownload the discussion guide.



Tunnel of Love will be presented as a serialized, episodic documentary. The movie’s centerpiece is a live concert, so I’m premiering each song as a stand alone chapter. There are 14 songs in the concert, so the distribution timeline will occur over a period of 14 weeks, from September to December 2014.

Here's chapter one:



ALIBI
Prophecy, she is a lonely business.
Ain’t not fumbling for first time lovers
Dancing right there under the covers
So won’t you be my alibi.
Poetry, means getting back what disappeared
Ain’t got no rolodex of opinions
Breaking bread with cupid’s minions
So won’t you be my alibi.
Jealousy, where is she going with that halo
Ain’t got no time to piss away my chances
Taking my lightning for granted
So won’t you be my alibi.



* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!


Sunday, September 28, 2014

Moments of Conception 111 -- The Haircut Scene from Edward Scissorhands

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.

And so, in this new blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.

Today's clip comes from the haircut scene in Edward Scissorhands: 



What can we learn?

Mixing up your vehicles helps you stay innovative. Edward begins by trimming the hedges. Then he starts grooming the neighborhood dogs. Soon he’s cutting the hair of the housewives. And by the end of the movie, he’s creating ice sculptures that create an effect of falling snow. It’s not just a reminder to create art, but also to explore new ways of being an artist. To search for new methods to circulate our views and extend our sentiments. The hard part is, we have to trust our audience, believing that if people really do value our work and appreciate us as creators, they will follow us down whatever new corridor we travel. Dylan, for example, recorded over forty studio albums, but he also published six books of painting and drawing. According to his biography, visual arts always played a significant role in his worldview. Drawing and painting served as an outlet for his huge creative energy. And once he finally began to use those mediums to reveal yet another dimension of his poetic vision, his audience responded to his extraordinary talent and treasured the work. Dylan’s paintings were shown in dozens of galleries and exhibitions around the world. And visual arts became one more shelf in his creative room. How can you avoid limiting yourself to one vision of your creative capabilities?


Going into the world. Edward’s inventor suffered a heart attack and died during his process of creation, leaving the young man unfinished forever. That’s why he’s spent most his life as a recluse, living in his hilltop mansion. But once he comes down that hill and meets the world, everything changes. He finds family, finds love and finds a home for all of his talents. Yet another example of what’s possible when we participate in the we. Humans, after all, understand the self in the context of other people. And if we truly want the highest understanding of who we are, eventually, we have to reach for the other. We have to cocreate with people. This movie always struck a social cord with me. Because for the first twenty years of my songwriting life, I treated music as an escape. As a way to hide from the world. Until one day, I read an interview with one of my songwriting heroes, who famously said, you have to get out of the basement and go out and play for people. That sentence changed my inner geography. Something very real inside of me shifted that day, and I haven’t been the same since. And so, now I perform every week. I’ve come out of music hibernation, hungry and active for nourishment. I don’t need to hide from the world anymore. Music let me share another part of my heart. Playing and singing songs in real time, in front of real people, about real emotions, is fulfilling on a level that is hard to express. Will you let the craving for togetherness trump the seductiveness of isolation?


Leaving no creative asset unharvested. Edward is putting himself on the line in front of an audience. First, by trimming shrubs and dogs, and later by sculpting real human hair. That’s what I love most about his creativity. People keep laying down track in front of his train. They use him like every part of the buffalo, tapping into his natural genius and talents. And for the first time in his life, Edward has purpose. He can finally use his gifts to contribute something of value to the world. The danger, however, is that he has no conception of boundaries. No moral code. Since he’s been living without a sense of reality and common sense for his whole life, he doesn’t realize he’s being taken advantage of. And so, housewives attempt to seduce him, kids take advantage of him, even bullies exploit his ability to pick locks and break into people’s homes. Because they know he’ll say yes. It’s a devastating reminder that if we don’t set boundaries for ourselves, other people will set them for us. And then they will violate them. And they will tell all their little friends to violate them too. All because we failed to set a precedent. Is this an opportunity, or an opportunity to be used?


What did you learn?


* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Saturday, September 27, 2014

Moments of Conception 110 -- The Budget Scene from Dave

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.

And so, in this new blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.

Today's clip comes from the budget scene in Dave:


What can we learn?

Susceptible to executional inertia. The creator is in the business of giving shape and forward motion to his ideas. Turning the obsession that fascinates him into something real in the world. However, while this work is intellectually and existentially rewarding, it’s not cheap. The purchase price of creativity is uncertainty. Not knowing always accompanies the artist as an unwanted lifelong companion. And unless we learn how to circumvent it, the process will continue to feel like walking backwards into a dark tunnel. Dave is a celebrity impersonator, not the leader of the free world. He smiles like a schmuck. He doesn’t know the first thing about being president, much less balancing the federal budget. And now certainly isn’t the time to learn. But this is a national emergency. If he doesn’t cut a half a billion dollars, he’ll never be able to restore the children’s homeless shelter. And so, he enlists his accountant friend to help him rewrite the budget. Together, the two of them discover myriad ways in which the government can tighten its belt, reprioritize their spending and focus on the issues that matter most. I’ve always loved this scene. It reminds me that what we lack in knowledge we can make up in resourcefulness, courage, passion and commitment. Because if we always waited until we knew what we were doing, we’d never do anything. What is waiting getting in the way of?


There is nothing to do but begin. Moliere famously said that theater was just two planks and a passion. Notice he didn’t say anything about writing scripts, securing royalties, casting actors, designing costumes, building sets, booking space, acquiring financing, hiring staff, booking security, choreographing dances, scoring music, selling tickets and contacting promoters. Because none of that matters. If you really wanted to put on a show, you would have done it by now. You’re the only thing in the way. Knowledge isn’t the thing that sets your dream free, you are. Dave, then, is a master of negative capability. He’s honed the skill of being in uncertainties, living with mysteries and dwelling in doubts. And if he knows anything, it’s that not knowing has zero bearing on whether or not his dream becomes a reality. It’s simply a matter of will. Ultimately, each creator owes it to themselves to hone this capability. Because while we can’t control life’s waves of uncertainty, at least we can improve our surfing skills so we’re ready when the big one comes crashing in. How could you lower the threshold for getting started?


A little ignorance goes a long way. Dave brings perspective from an unbiased source. He’s just a regular guy whose intellectual limitations free him to consider the winning solutions our government has long since taken for granted. Someone who knows there is no prerequisite to giving good ideas a future. I’m reminded of a client meeting from several years ago. The president of the company said they needed someone who could come in and ask the dumb questions that they stopped asking long ago, because they just know. And I told him, that’s why I’m here, because I know nothing. And they hired me. Why? Because a little ignorance goes a long way. Because objectivity is equity. And because sometimes it takes a person who knows nothing to change everything. Consider that as a permission slip for your own creative process. Focus on moving forward without moving flawlessly, focus on occupying your imperfection and adding energy to the system, and you’ll have no trouble making your dreams a reality. What if you don’t need to know as much as you think you do?


What did you learn?


* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Moments of Conception 109 -- The Typing Scene from Misery

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.

And so, in this new blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.

Today's clip comes from the typing scene in Misery:



What can we learn?


If you do it right, you never start with nothing. Everyone has the equivalent to a blank page in their lives. It’s that intimidating, torturous, paralyzing and dreadful part of the work that requires you to confront an empty canvas and create something from whole cloth. Cartoonists even have a name for it. They call it the blazing island of white. But while many artists romanticize the notion of the blank page, it’s actually a profoundly unhealthy and inefficient way to work. What’s smarter is to dig your well before you’re thirsty. To accumulate an ongoing reference file for your brain to work on through a passive, unconscious process. Think of it as forced savings account for your ideas that always has a high enough balance to make withdrawals. That way, when you sit down to create, the blank page is no longer ground zero, your life is. Because your intellectual reservoir is constantly replenished, the blank page has become a moot point instead of a massive pain. Paul, on the other hand,  doesn’t have a choice. Instead of completing the first draft of his novel in his usual historical, elegant hotel room, now his most loyal, but most psychotic fan is holding him captive. And when he fails to populate that blazing island of white, she smashes his ankles with a sledgehammer. A good reminder that our creative blocks could always be worse. Are you fortifying your intellectual inventory with an organized, trusted and robust system?


Pave the way for prolificacy. Paul’s writing process may be interesting for the screen, but it’s impractical for the career. No wonder he has writer’s block. Sitting down at a blank page is a cold start. It’s too overwhelming to the brain, which pushes a person to do too much work inside their head. And it creates too many outstanding thoughts that plague the consciousness, which makes it harder for a person to think creatively. It’s like walking into a factory and forcing the machine to run before it’s been brought up to operating temperature. Talk about misery. And so, the smarter approach to creating is much more gradualistic. Digging your well before you’re thirsty. Living your life in a way that your art gets done over and over. Making sure that the heavy lifting is everything that comes before your eyeballs stare at the blank canvas. That way, as soon as your butt hits the chair, you can hit the ground running instead of killing yourself trying to will ideas into existence. It’s the difference between sitting down because you have something to say, and sitting down because you just have to say something. Are you making it too hard on yourself to allow for psychic fuel to show up?


Be interesting before you open your mouth. I wrote my first book during my senior year of college. Not bad for my literary maiden voyage, but overall, it was a paragon of imperfection. It had design flaws, grammatical inconsistencies, even a couple of printing errors. But it didn’t matter. It was done and it was mine. I could touch it and smell it and hold it. And nobody could take that away from me. The best part was, because of the book, I now had something to do the talking for me. It was a hundred page calling card. A proxy that could do a lot of the heavy lifting before I opened my mouth. And that was something my mentor always stressed. He said that the greatest competitive advantage is, they’ve heard of you before. Meaning, your strategy as a creator isn’t to build a hype engine around your idea, but to physically make that idea. To build a prototype people can smell and touch. That way, when the time comes, you can slap it down on the table and let it do the talking for you. That’s not high concept, that’s high context. And it’s what makes your work stick. What could I you do to establish instant credibility in this moment?


What did you learn?


* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Moments of Conception 108 -- The Harvard Scene from Legally Blonde

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.

And so, in this new blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.

Today's clip comes from the Harvard scene in Legally Blonde:



What can we learn?


An ocean under a fickle moon. Life has a funny way of raising our fuel grade. Elle’s original incentive to pursuing a law degree is to win back her ex, but once she finally realizes he will never respect her, she’s determined to succeed on her own. It’s the classic story of how the rules we navigate by at the beginning shift by the time we get to the end. How what we think love is differs from what we find love to be. But it’s not just a pattern in couples, it’s also a phenomenon in creating. My original motivation for making a documentary was purely creative. I just wanted to share my art with the world. To build a visual archive of ideas things that were important to me at this stage of my life. But that was a year ago. And now that we’ve entered into post production and can see the light at the end of the tunnel, new motivations have surfaced. Bigger ones. Better ones. More mature ones. Now I’m making the movie because it’s an opportunity to fire on all cylinders. To engage in a process that draws out my full ingenuity. To take hidden skills and talents I have not yet tapped into to create value. And to up the emotional, psychological and financial ante, trading in my current success for something better. I believe that’s why the process has galvanized me in such a profound way. It’s demanded that I move to a courageous place that I rarely occupy. How do your original motivations differ from your formed motivations?


Be responsible for your own evolution. We all get trapped on the creative treadmill eventually. Running but never getting anywhere new. Executing but never elevating the work. And when we do, there will always be a ceiling on what we can accomplish. Success will remain asymptotic, always approaching infinity, but never actually getting there. And unless we break the pattern, unless we change the user interface of our realities, we will fail to develop as creators. Elle breaks the pattern. She could easily blend in and bow to the common will, using her beauty and money and personality to life a charmed life. But she’d rather aim herself in the direction of her own creation. And so, instead of becoming a washed up suntan lotion model, she goes on to become happily married and a successful lawyer and politician. Not bad for bratty cheerleader. That’s the thing about going your own way. You have to leave room for the unexpected. Elle probably never could have predicted she’d grow up to become an attorney. But when she looks back on her life, odds are, she’ll think to herself, that sounds about right. How can you design and develop a future that you really want for yourself?


You don’t have to compromise your originality. Harvard has never seen a colorful student like this before. Elle sprays perfume on her college application and records a video essay in a hot tub while wearing a string bikini. Not exactly ivy league material. But although the board of admissions is bewildered at her style and approach, they’re still impressed. So she gets accepted. Now, what’s interesting about her character is, the value proposition evolves. Elle proves to the university that she’s more than just a pretty face in a cute dress when she taps into her extensive expertise in cosmetic surgery, fashion merchandising and perm hairstyling to expose multiple lies in the murder trial, thus exonerating the falsely accused fitness instructor and identifying the murderer. Beauty and charm may have opened the door, but intelligence and judgment keep her in the room. It’s a helpful reminder that if you have shtick, support it with substance. Otherwise it’s just empty calories. You’re multiplying the brand by zero. Do you understand the fine line between purpose driven human uniqueness and a patchwork of weirdness? 


What did you learn?


* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Moments of Conception 107 -- The Taxi Scene from Fame

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.

And so, in this new blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.

Today's clip comes from the taxi scene in Fame:




What can we learn?


Don’t chase the high, follow the heart. During a recent podcast interview, I heard a hugely successful actor offer a great piece of advice to young performers. Don’t be famous, be legendary. Fame is the industrial disease of creativity, he said. It’s a sludgy by product if making things. That's a bold statement. Considering we live in a world where attention trumps accomplishment, where a person’s fame tends to eclipse their actual contributions as a creator, his advice is sorely needed. And yet, that doesn’t give us permission to hide from the world. If we insist on keeping our music locked up inside ourselves, we’ll always be winking in the dark. There’s a balance. That’s the theme in this movie. Not just fame, but shame. The crippling fear of creative vulnerability. The willingness to stick yourself out there, quite literally, even if that means dancing with your friends down a crowded avenue. Because even know the father and son constantly argue over the boy’s reluctance to play his music publicly, the kid’s gotta learn to love what’s good for him eventually. That’s the only way to become legendary. How time did you spend working on your legacy today


Don’t be stopped by not knowing how. This scene represents the herald in the hero’s journey. The act to signal change. The moment that invite the character to answer the call to adventure and motivate into action, despite his frequent desire to maintain the status quo. Bruno resists, though. He complains that his tapes aren’t ready yet. That they’re not supposed to be played. But his father is right. Look at the people. They don’t know it’s not ready. They like it. Is he really going to try and argue with a dancing mob of teenagers the middle of the busiest street in the nation? Do the math, kid. And that’s what I love about the creative process. You’re never really ready. If you always waited until you were ready, you’d never produce anything. Just aim for eighty percent and jump. You’re the only one sweating over the twenty. The point is, whether you’re writing dance music, making abstract paintings or hosting your own cooking show, finished is better than perfect. Failure stems less from poor planning and more from the timidity to proceed. Don’t make gods out of your plans. Just go. What inner conflict is slowing your creativity down?


All love is saying yes to something. Bruno was right, that lunatic stole his tape. But it’s still the best thing that could have happened to his career as a musician. He doesn’t know it yet, but the whole course of his life will pivot on this encounter. People will remember his name. And in five years, he’s going to look back and think to himself, boy am I glad that my dad blasted that song from the roof of his car. In fact, every artist should be lucky enough to have a parent like that. Relentlessly affirming, instantly encouraging, endlessly participating, radically accepting. That’s the kind of support system that makes or breaks an artist. This scene actually reminds me of my own family. Growing up, we seven grandchildren were never met with tilted heads. Whatever artistic endeavors we pursued, whatever magnificent obsessions we turned our brains over to, there wasn’t an elder in the room who wasn’t on board at a moment’s notice. And that’s the reason each of us went on to have unique and interesting and meaningful creative lives. What are the characteristics of the most supportive possible environment you can think of for your own creative work?


What did you learn?


* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Monday, September 22, 2014

Tunnel of Love Official Trailer (2014) -- Scott Ginsberg Concert Documentary

Tunnel of Love is a feature length concert documentary written, produced, directed and scored by Scott Ginsberg. The film explores the intersection of identity, belonging and creativity.

It’s a look at the transformative power of live music, both on the audience and the performer. It’s an homage the sonic potential of natural acoustics. And it’s a playful narrative about two lovers in the process of changing their pronouns.

Through live performances, playful and romantic exchanges, unexpected creative moments of conception and behind the scenes storytelling, the film takes you on a heartfelt journey about what it means to be an artist, a romantic and an opportunist.


Tunnel of Love is a full length, feature documentary, but will initially be distributed in a unique way. I'll be sharing the film as a serialized / episodic project. Since the movie’s centerpiece is a live concert, I'm premiering each song as a stand alone chapter. There are 14 songs in the concert, and so, the distribution timeline will occur over a period of 14 weeks. 

For now, here's the official trailer:



To learn more about the film, please visit the movie homepage:

www.tunneloflovedoc.com

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Moments of Conception 106 -- The Hospital Scene in Overboard

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.

And so, in this new blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.

Today's clip comes from the hospital scene in Overboard:




What can we learn?


A labor for which no adjective applies. Overboard is one of my top ten movies of all time. My brother and watched it almost every weekend growing up. What’s interesting is, as an adult, I view it as movie about reinvention. Either of your own violation, or with the help of a vengeful, sweaty carpenter. But here’s the thing. Reinvention isn’t about turning everything on its head for the sake of change. Sometimes, it’s a simple matter of upping the creative ante. Sinking your teeth into a new project that’s bigger than you. Pursuing something that’s more of a gamble than a guarantee. Something that requires you to hold and nurture a large idea. Something that forces you to expand as you the idea comes to fruition. That’s one of the reasons I decided to make a concert documentary. I wanted to feel engaged and tested and stretched. To travel with an idea to a deeper place, one that I had never dared ventured before. And as we wrap up production, the feelings of fulfillment have never been stronger. Turns out, there’s a unmatched sense of pride you feel from having lived up to the higher expectations set for yourself. When was the last time you reinvented?


Try to surf whatever wave is out there. Joanna’s real husband had his chance. After seeing her mental state and watching how horribly she treated the staff, he actually denied knowing her, walked out of the hospital a free man and returned to their yacht to embark on a spree of parties with younger women. Dean, on the other hand, has a strong opportunity agenda. As a poor widower living in redneck clutter, he exploits the situation to remedy his own domestic problems. Which makes total sense. The man is a carpenter. His job is to repair damage, install structure and efficiently contribute to the home owner’s total satisfaction. The only difference is, instead of swinging a hammer, he’s stealing a human. Which is definitely immoral and probably illegal, but you have to admit, it’s also devilishly creative. Dean may not have a lot of money, but the man knows how to be resourceful. And that what creativity is all about. Wherewithal. Buttressing the opportunity to make art with whatever knowledge, resources and courage are available to you. Even if that means breaking the rules once in a while. When was the last time you felt fully resourced, and abundant?


Mutual musedom magic. Joanna struggles to adapt to her new lifestyle, but eventually she masters her responsibilities with wisdom and grace. The best part is, she ends up helping her new husband’s dream come true by working with him to design a miniature golf course based on her untapped knowledge of the Seven Wonders of the World. Which proves, a good muse is hard to find. But if you’re lucky enough to fall in love with one, that person’s work becomes a labor for which no adjective applies. Tom Waits frequently espouses the benefit of marrying your muse, pardon the pun. He famously said that as a songwriter, he’s often in a stroller waiting to be pushed out into traffic, but his wife is the one that will do it. That she has a remarkable imagination, and that’s the nation where he lives. In another bizarre and heartfelt interview about the secrets of their collaboration process, he also said that his wife doesn’t like the light of the business we call show. She stays hidden, but that’s where she likes it, and that’s why she’s an amazing collaborator. If your family would support anything you chose to do, what might you try?


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Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Friday, September 19, 2014

Moments of Conception 105 -- The Pep Talk Scene from Swingers

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.

And so, in this new blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.

Today's clip comes from the pep talk scene in Swingers:


What can we learn?

Reduce anxiety by reorienting your focus. Managing anxiety is a slow, frustrating and circular process. It feels like all the work we do to become less stressed becomes the very thing that stresses us out even more. What kind of sick, twisted infinite regression is that? Fortunately, anxiety is what keeps us tuned into our circumstances. It serves a purpose because it allows us to focus our energy on the future. It’s a symptom, like the engine light on the dashboard, which illuminates to let us know that something is wrong with our engine. And the good news is, like most of our emotions, anxiety vanishes once spotted and labeled. Once we name it, we claim it. Once we love it, it can’t hurt us anymore. The anxiety we’re currently feeling starts to subside to the point of irrelevancy. Mike hasn’t figured this out yet. Rob, on the other hand, sees his friend slumped in a corner, slicing pepperoni with a pocket knife, knows the truth. That we always have a choice. We can design a way out of our anxiety, we can design a way of living with it, or we can wait it out and let it starve itself to death, trusting that eventually, anxiety will briefly let its guard down and allow happiness to take hold. Are you prepared to do whatever work is necessary to reduce your experience of anxiety?

Don’t scratch unless there’s really an itch. Commitment is more than just choosing, it’s bravely dealing with the consequences of your choices. Following yourself down the rabbit hole of yes. Taking responsibility for the life you’ve chosen. Not always looking for the closer parking spot, as I like to say. Mike relocated across the country to follow his dreams, which meant leaving past love behind. But now he regrets the decision he made. He’s become a slave to his own judgments. Instead of getting on with his new life comfortably, he’s plagued by doubt, wondering about what could have been a marginally better option. Creative people struggle with this all the time. We hold ourselves to a high standard, and yet, once our experience matches those standards, we don’t give ourselves permission to be satisfied with results. Schwartz famously dubbed this phenomenon the paradox of choice, whereby the ability to change our minds about a decision does nothing but set the stage for future anxiety and lower ultimate satisfaction. Because sometimes the best choice is the decision to stop choosing. Sometimes it’s smarter to put a stake in the ground before we get seduced into the stressful spiral of perpetual improvement. Are you focused on making the right choice or making the commitment to choosing?

You can’t fake momentum. It’s something you either have or you don’t. Think of it from a mechanical engineering standpoint. You need mass, meaning some form of creative output; multiplied by velocity, meaning some form of physical movement. Without those critical variables, all you’ve got is a pile of dirty clothes and a floor covered in orange juice containers. Mike is in desperate need of momentum, and that’s exactly why his friend stops by his house. Rob is there to give him hope and courage and a psychological pat on the back. To convince him to start adding energy to the system. To inspire him to move the story forward. Because that’s how momentum works. It’s built upon small, consistent victories. Of course, that’s not enough. You also need to keep momentum alive. One way of doing so is with a victory log, which is a visual record of progress that saturates your consciousness with victory. A strategy of surrounding yourself with concrete evidence of improvement that makes you more inclined to take further action. I use mine every day. How will you create more mass and velocity?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Moments of Conception 104 -- The Costume Scene from Kickass

All creativity begins with the moment of conception.

That little piece of kindling that gets the fire going. That initial source of inspiration that takes on a life of its own. That single note from which the entire symphony grows. That single spark of life that signals an idea’s movement value, almost screaming to us, something wants to be built here.

And so, in this new blog series, I’m going to be deconstructing my favorite moments of conception from popular movies. Each post will contain a video clip from a different film, along with a series of lessons we can learn from the characters.

Today's clip comes from the costume scene in Kickass:



What can we learn?

Generate your own demand. There isn’t an artist alive who doesn’t have some fear of the work drying up. It’s just the uncertain nature of the job. Tossing coins in the wishing well, hoping bills float to the surface. But one should never curse an empty calendar, as my mentor once said. Because nobody is going to change the pattern for us. The door must be opened from the inside. We must stoke our own intellectual fire. We must manufacture the opportunities that allow us to be as creative as we are. We must choose productive obsessions with potential to galvanize us. We must generate the internal pressure required turn an idea into an appropriate reality. Because if we don’t make that effort, if we don’t give ourselves that authority, nothing will happen. And we’ll blame everything but the person in the mirror. Dave doesn’t need a trauma or cosmic rays or a power ring to become a superhero, just the perfect combination of optimism, naivety and the willingness to put the onus on himself. Even if the city wasn’t looking for a superhero, he assumes that a lull in demand is merely a lack of imagination. He doesn’t wait for things to happen to him, he goes out and happens to things. Proving, that demand is only in short supply if we allow it to be. Are you waiting for your ship to come in or working to extend the reach of your dock


Everyone’s first hello world doesn’t work. Dave is an ordinary teenager who takes his obsession with comic books as inspiration to become a real life superhero. But the first time he goes out to fight crime, it’s not exactly the theatrical success he envisioned. Kickass receives a severe beating and stabbing by thugs, gets hit by a car, suffers multiple fractures and has to get metal plates put into his body. Worse yet, when he returns to school after extensive physical rehabilitation, there’s a new rumor that he’s a gay prostitute. How’s that for initial market feedback? If he were running a business, he would have quit and never looked back. And yet, he sticks with his idea. He takes his lumps and keeps moving the story forward. I’m reminded of my first six months of wearing a nametag every day. It was unbearable. People stared at me, girls avoided me, friends and family cracked jokes, complete strangers invaded my personal space, even one drunk hockey player picked fight with me. But something told me to stick with it. Something told me this was important, and that you persisted, there would be a reward waiting on the other side. How are you turning your trials into persistence?


Get your ass out of the basement. Kickass literally puts himself in the way of trouble. That’s his business model. He goes out looking for problems to solve and people to help. And he barrels toward his work with complete single mindedness, despite suffering the slings and arrows of outrageous adolescence. Dave is interactive, reactive and proactive. Even if he does choose to face the world through a mask, I applaud his efforts not to avoid the emotional risk associated with live encounters. That’s something many artists struggle with. Not battling criminals, but battling their own antisocial tendencies. Getting out of their heads. Remembering to spend time with real people in real places doing real things. Putting themselves on an intercept path with interesting experiences to inform, enrich and inspire their work. It’s part and parcel of a gradualistic approach to creativity, one that rejects the notion of the elusive eureka moment, and instead tout an existential and holistic approach to a prolific career, living your life in a way that your art gets done over and over. How many people did you go out of your way to avoid last week?


* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author. Speaker. Strategist. Filmmaker. Publisher. Songwriter. 
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice. Customized for your audience. Impossible to walk away uninspired.

Now booking for 2014-2015.


Email to inquire about fees and availability. Watch clips of The Nametag Guy in action here!