Friday, June 22, 2012

The Definition of Writing Has Changed Forever

Sometimes it’s easier to enter through the side door.

That’s what I told a friend of mine. That if we don’t enjoy the act of writing – yet have the urge to capture our experience and share it with the world – what we need is to expand our definition of writing.

Because once we expand the definition, we change the context. Once we change the context, we lower the threat level. And once we lower the threat level, there are fewer excuses to prevent us from getting started.

Originally, writing meant, “to carve.”

Later, writing meant, “to put ink on paper for others to read.”

But now that paper is going away, now that ink is has evolved into a digital medium, now that reading isn’t the only form of consumption, and now there are more methods of “putting” than ever before, the definition of writing has changed forever.

Now, sending a text is writing.
Now, publishing a blog is writing.
Now, recording a podcast is writing.
Now, tweeting our thoughts is writing.
Now, posting a status update is writing.
Now, shooting a video message is writing.
Now, instant messaging our friends is writing.

But we’re still carving. And that’s the key.

Because even if what we say sucks, even if nobody listens, even if we don’t think of what we’re doing as writing, end even if the world is too stubborn and close-minded to classify it as such, anytime we take a moment to render what’s in our hearts, we’re writing.

And once we grasp that concept, once we give ourselves permission to enter through the side door, the process become a lot less threatening and lot more fun.