Watch Scott's TEDx talk!

A brand, a business and a career. From a nametag.

The Nametag Manifesto

Why everybody should wear nametags.

Steal Scott's Books!

Download every book Scott has ever written for free.

Rent Scott's Brain!

Mentoring isn't a relationship, it's an inheritance.

Brandtag Strategic Planning Crusades!

Make your mission more than a statement.

Interview Scott for Your Publication

Featured on every news network in the country.

Monday, October 31, 2011

What Social Gift Are You Known For?

Humans don’t like to think, choose or remember.

It’s too much work, takes too long and causes anxiety.

That’s the upside of technology: You no longer need to remember or know things – only where to find those things.

But you don’t always have a computer. Sometimes you have to depend on your brain.

That’s why a nametag is a social gift.
It’s one less name to remember. People don’t have to do extra work to figure out who you are. Your act of generosity relaxes their already overloaded brains, pampers their memory and frees up their heads to focus on more important things.

That’s why complete strangers will actually thank me for wearing a nametag.

You’re welcome.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What social gift are you known for?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "46 Types of Marketing," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.

Now booking for 2011-2012!

Watch The Nametag Guy in action here!

Friday, October 28, 2011

Brandtag Strategic Planning Crusades | Make Your Mission More Than a Statement


This strategic planning crusade helps brands uncover who they are, what they change and why they matter.

Photo
My client, Nestle Purina said:

"Now we can bring our values to the forefront and make them ooze with personality and emotion!" 

Brandtag solves two pervasive, expensive, real and urgent problems.

First, it eliminates the problem of identity. It clarifies your mission. It gives your values personality. Second, it solves the problem of disengagement. It makes your brand ownable and joinable. It creates a visual reminder that unites people.

What happens when we know who we are? Everything.
That's the upside of identity: Knowledge isn't just power, it's the engine of profit.

To learn more about your facilitator, meet Scott Ginsberg.

To get in touch with your facilitator, contact Scott Ginsberg.

To view a case studies from client, view Closeouts with Class.

PRIVACY POLICY:

HELLO, my name is Scott, LLC, is committed to ensuring that your privacy is protected. We hate spam and spammers. We will never sell your information. If you believe that any information we are holding on you is incorrect, incomplete or improper, please call 314/374-3397.








Thursday, October 27, 2011

When Laxatives Aren't Enough

The problem with laxatives is that we never learn how to push on our own.

It feels good. It cleanses the system. And it gets the job done. But when we give ourselves a crutch we don’t need, we develop a limp we shouldn’t have.

As artists, the goal is to get things moving without outside assistance. To fire inspiration into ourselves, instead of waiting for lightning to strike and then chasing the flame.

We create from the inside out, not the other way around.
This approach is hard. Took me several years to figure it out.

It challenges us to trust our own ability to sit down and spontaneously respond to life. Like a like a jazz saxophonist, there’s no preparation because our life is our preparation.

We have to believe in our own resources. To have faith that we’re richly supported by something bigger, and that we possess the will to channel that spirit. That way, when the creative moment comes, we become the convergence of everything that’s ever happened to us, and just start riffing.

And hopefully, it doesn’t sound like poop.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
How do you get things going?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "99 Questions Every Entrepreneur Should Ask," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.

Now booking for 2011-2012!

Watch The Nametag Guy in action here!

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Why Confidence Threatens People

Wearing a nametag is surprisingly polarizing.

I’ve had people refuse to go out in public with me because of it. I’ve had businesses refuse to let me in the door because of it. I’ve had strangers start fights with me because of it. I’ve had girls break up with me because of it.

Good lord. It’s just a sticker.

Or is it?

Apparently for some people, it’s not a sticker – it’s a social liability.

I know this because they’ve told me this. Their reputation is in danger by association. And standing next to the guy with the nametag is damaging to their image.

“Hey Scott, could you just stand over there for the rest of the night?”
It’s a sticker.

Or is it?

My theory is, it’s not that people have a problem with the nametag – it’s that people have a problem being around someone who is okay with himself.

Confidence threatens people. Especially insecure people.

And I think it’s our job, as human beings, to view each others' self-assurance not as a liability, but as an inspiration.

If we encounter someone who puts unadulterated self-belief at the apex of their value system – that’s a gift.

And we need to be confident enough to receive it.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What's your nametag?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For a list called, "7 Ways to Out Experience the Competition," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Entrepreneur, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Sick of selling?
Tired of cold calling?
Bored with traditional prospecting approaches?


Buy Scott's book and learn how to sell enable people to buy!

Pick up your copy (or a case!) right here.

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Where Poor Customer Service Comes From

It’s amazing.

Considering how much time, money and effort companies spend on customer service training; we’re never really taught to become better customers ourselves.

Because in most of the day’s transactions, we’re the customers – not the servers.

But if we truly want to have a joyful, remarkable experience, we can’t just sit back and wait for people to read our minds and make us happy.

We have to help them help us. As guests, patients, viewers, clients, patrons, members, visitors, users, callers, listeners and customers, we have to make ourselves more servable.

Otherwise we’re equally at fault for not getting what we want, the way we want it.
It starts with expectational clarity. Sharing what’s important to us. Letting people in on our preferences. And delivering a vision of what happiness looks like.

Take a massage studio. If we don’t want the therapist yapping our ear off during the entire session, we need to speak up and let her know that silence is essential to our relaxation. Otherwise we end up getting mad at her for being chatty and ruining the experience, when all we had to do was take two seconds to say, “Oh, and I prefer to keep quiet most of the time.”

Being a better customer also has to with vocalizing dissatisfaction. Letting those who serve us know that we’re not happy with the exchange. Unfortunately, this is harder than it sounds because, as humans, we dread confrontation. We avoid conflict. And we don’t want to be difficult.

We’d rather suck it up and eat the overcooked steak instead of making a fuss, sending it back and risk being the topic of conversation in the kitchen.

Because nobody wants to be the freak at the table.

The problem is, this kind of passivity hurts both parties.

It hurts the server because he misses out on valuable feedback from his customer. Our silence robs him of the opportunity to create a service moment and a story worth repeating.

But it also hurts us. It reduces our experience. We get annoyed that an employee missed the mark, and we selfishly assume it’s because he’s an incompetent dolt who doesn’t listen to his customers.

When in reality, the real reason we’re so unhappy is because we made that employee do unnecessary guesswork.

We never helped them help us.

We just sat there, winking in the dark, hoping they would read our minds.

And unless we’re getting our palm read, that’s not the smartest path to happiness.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
Are you a good customer?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "58 Questions about Questions" send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.

Now booking for 2011-2012!

Watch The Nametag Guy in action here!

Monday, October 24, 2011

Watch Scott Ginsberg's Interview w/Mike Stenger on Living Social



LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What's your nametag?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For a list called, "153 Quotations to Inspire Your Success," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Entrepreneur, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Sick of selling?
Tired of cold calling?
Bored with traditional prospecting approaches?


Buy Scott's book and learn how to sell enable people to buy!

Pick up your copy (or a case!) right here.

Friday, October 21, 2011

When a Nametag Isn't a Nametag

“I could never wear a nametag everyday!”

That’s what people tell me.

And I believe them.

The only thing is, they already do. We all do. Each one of us wears a nametag every day of our lives.

It’s just not always in the form of a sticker.

Remember, it’s not a nametag:

It’s an opening, an opportunity, an invitation, a gesture, a declaration, a conversation, an acknowledgment, an act, a brand, a commitment, a contact, an engagement, an equalizer, an experiment, a filter, a generosity, an identity, an introduction, a label, a message, a mystery, a namesake, a permission slip, a personalization, a reputation, a socialization, a surprise, a vulnerability, a weapon and an advertisement.

What is it – that you do – that is all of those things?

That’s your nametag.

Instead of asking why you should wear it, ask what’s already written on it.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What's your nametag?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For a list called, "7 Ways to Out Experience the Competition," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Entrepreneur, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Sick of selling?
Tired of cold calling?
Bored with traditional prospecting approaches?


Buy Scott's book and learn how to sell enable people to buy!

Pick up your copy (or a case!) right here.

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Isn't Gender Strange?

I was supposed to be Jessica.

My parents were expecting a girl all along.

Which makes total sense, considering how girlie I’ve always been:

I cry at movies. I’m ultra sensitive. I’m touchy feely. I don’t care about sports. I hate beer. I’m not macho. I love shopping. I’m obsessed with my hair. I have way too many shoes.

I’m the daughter they never had.
Still, I’m proud to be Scott every day of my life. I’m proud to be a man everyday of my life. Wouldn’t trade it for anything. Considering women are the most oppressed minority on the planet, I think I lucked out.

Besides, there aren’t as many branding possibilities with, “HELLO, my name is Jessica.”

Turns out, the name Scott actually translates to “painted warrior.”

Considering the tattoo, I’d say my parents made the right choice.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
Isn't gender strange?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "71 Things Customers Don't Want to Hear You Say" send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.

Now booking for 2011-2012!

Watch The Nametag Guy in action here!

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

A Different Philosophy on Being Different

My whole life, I never quite fit in.

I was always just a little different.

Not so different that nobody wanted to be friends with me. Not so different that I felt excessively entitled or self-righteously appointed. But different enough to feel like an alien wherever I went.

And then I moved to Portland.

The city where different is the default.
Everybody fits in – because nobody fits in. It’s so fantastically unique, so delightfully weird and so endearingly eclectic, that you can’t help but acknowledge and applaud people’s differences.

The place is so weird, I almost felt normal. That says a lot.

I remember my first day. I was riding the bus when a guy asked, “You’re not from around here, are you Scott?”

“How did you guess?”

“Nobody uses umbrellas here. When it rains, we either celebrate it or ignore it.”

That’s when I said to myself: “These are my people.”

I fell in love with the city. Had some of the greatest times of my life. Made lifelong friends I’ll never forget. And learned lessons that changed me forever. And although I only spent fourteen months there, the spirit of Portland will always remain under my fingernails.

You have to understand, I grew up in suburban St. Louis. I went to college in rural Ohio. So it was a nice change of posture to live in a community where accepting people’s differences is a given – but celebrating them is the gift.

Can you imagine if more places adopted that mentality?
Can you imagine if we stopped holding ourselves hostage by our intolerance?

Sadly, our society still operates on the outdated, close-minded cliché that the nail that sticks up should be hammered down. That being different is the enemy.

I don’t care how open we claim to be: We still actively avoid contact with people who are not like us because of a fear of social contamination.

It’s time to adopt a different philosophy about being different.

Not only that it’s acceptable – but also that it’s encouraged and edified.

Fit out.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
How do you put yourself on equal footing with the people around you?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "31 Questions to Test Your Listening Skills" send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.

Now booking for 2011-2012!

Watch The Nametag Guy in action here!

Monday, October 17, 2011

Watch Scott Ginsberg's Interview on The Big Business Show w/Rod Kirby



Learn more about Rod's very cool show here.
LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What are you known for?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "8 Ways to Move Quickly on New Opportunities" send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.

Now booking for 2011-2012!

Watch The Nametag Guy in action here!

Saturday, October 15, 2011

Download Every Book Scott Ginsberg Has Ever Written, For Free, Right Now, For Real!

As an artist, I’d rather be heard than paid.

My entire career as a writer, publisher, performer and consultant has flourished on the power of giving myself away. And considering the current expectation of the marketplace, why charge customers for a digital cow they’re already milking for free?

Enjoy all 13 of my books as free downloads. For real.

(Also, please tell everyone you know to come to www.StealScottsBooks.com)

My first book wasn't a book: It was a brand, a stand, a story and a statement. I wrote it during my senior year of college at Miami University. I had no plan, no goals and no motivation other than, "Writing is the only thing I can't remember not doing, and if I don't write this book, I will regret it." So I did. And it changed my life forever.




Any sophomore effort is rife with pressure and expectation. And since I needed substance behind the shtick of the nametag, I chose approachability. Or maybe approachability chose me. It was hard to write and required a lot of research, since I didn't have much experience to dwell on. But it's still my best selling title of all time, and it helped me own that word in the marketplace. Plus it got me a quiz for Cosmo. Wow.


Due to the nametag, everyone called me "that guy." The difference was, they did so in a positive way. And I figured that would make a cool book. Polarizing title notwithstanding, I wrote it quickly and enjoyably, and it has sold well. My favorite part is the testimonial from my older brother, who has only read five books in his life, including this one. Score.



The most beautiful book I've ever done. My design team knocked it out of the park with this one. The cover is striking, the inside pages are colorful and the title is perfect. What I love most about this book is how heavy it is, due to the full color bleed on the print version. It just feels valuable. Plus, the dedication is to my parents, on whom I blame everything good that happens in my life.



The first in my series, this book was a response to my clients, who wanted to read short, fun, helpful books on specific job functions. Having worked in retail, food service and hospitality, it was cool to write from a service perspective. Not a lot of personal stories, just ideas I'd been learning as I traveled around the world, working with cool organizations.


 
I don't like sales and I'm not particularly skilled at sales. So I wrote this book for myself. It's got solid content on enabling customers to buy, not just selling. And I'm really happy with a few of the chapter about questions and conversation. It helped me sell more and sell better, and the feedback from readers has been tremendous. Especially in the professional services arena.



Managers are notorious for being unapproachable. I've certainly had bad ones in my day, so I wrote this book to help those in that role. And I'll never forget the airport executive who grabbed a copy and asked if there was a chapter on getting employees to go away so you could actually get work done. I later added a chapter on boundaries to address that issue. Whew!




It's a concept album. Not a book, a symphony. And it's structured with movements, codas, interludes and the like. So much fun to write. Two books in one. Engaging cover in "flip-flop" style. And it absolutely drove my design team crazy. Total pain in the ass to produce. But, it's hard cover, and it feels super fancy and credible. Amazing how touch affects credibility.



I'm not an angry person by any stretch of the imagination, but this book is basically me venting. Therapeutic to write, intense to read and I had a blast putting it together. But initially, I hesitated to publish it. And that's how I knew it was important. So I did. Never charged for it. Always meant it to be a free download. And readers loved it. Especially me.



I wrote this book on the floor of the food court in the mall by my old house. The cover is absolutely gorgeous, fun and intentionally corporate. Sold tons over the years. The content I adore. And it's highly spiritual stuff, since I wrote around the time I began practicing yoga. Kind of a time capsule into my life in my late twenties. Gotta love those ducks.


I think the bull on the cover of this book is the cutest thing ever. We must have browsed hundreds of graphics until we found the right one. Anyway, it's another concept book. Most people didn't get it. But my friends Adam and Jeremy and I came up with the chapter titles at our Sunday Sushi Club. Funniest table of contents ever written. Worth reading it just for that.


 
I wrote this book because I was tired of hearing people complain about how they had ideas, but never did anything with them. Considering I made an entire career out of wearing a nametag, who better to write this book than me? It's the first daily devotional, which became my trademark style once this book came out. First of its kind, very strong content. 


 
It seems wrong to pick your favorite book, but this one is so freaking amazing. The cover is stunning, the content is gold and I think I had the most fun and felt the most like myself while writing it. Another devotional, making dozens of family references, this book will always go down as a turning point in both my personal and professional lives.





LET ME ASK YA THIS...

What have you given away for free this week?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Send a friend to www.StealScottsBooks.com and give me as a gift to them.


* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Writing, Publishing, Performing, Consulting
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Friday, October 14, 2011

Scott Ginsberg's Keynote Speech: Hire Yourself! Burn Your Resume & Create a Career That Counts

This clip is from The Go Network on Vimeo!

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
Have you ever thought about hiring yourself?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "16 Ways to be the Best," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.

Now booking for 2011-2012!

Watch The Nametag Guy in action here!

Thursday, October 13, 2011

The Joy of Equal Footing

Not to brag, but I hold the world record for wearing nametags.

Don’t act like you’re not impressed.

But as the world’s foremost expert, I am uniquely qualified to give an opinion on how nametags should be worn. Here’s my theory:

No last names. No company names. No logos. No titles. No acronyms. No designations.

First name only. Nothing else.
This levels the playing field. This restores the balance of power. This eliminates competition. This prevents pigeonholing. And this stops people from being better than others with a lesser tag.

By eliminating unnecessary labels, by stripping accumulated adjectives and by boiling people down to their human essence – their names – it’s harder to judge each other and easier to get to know each other.

I wonder how different our planet would be if we were willing to put values before vocation, humanity before statistics, personality before position and individuality before industry.

I wonder.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
How do you put yourself on equal footing with the people around you?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "31 Questions to Test Your Listening Skills" send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.

Now booking for 2011-2012!

Watch The Nametag Guy in action here!

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

The Analog Friend Request

The road less traveled isn’t just foggy – it’s lonely.

Whether you’re a writer, freelancer, artist, entrepreneur, or part of a mobile workforce, there are more people going it alone that every before in history.

Our culture encourages it, our technology enables it and our economy demands it.

Which is great for productivity and flexibility.

But we’re still human. And human beings are social animals.

Creativity without community, isn’t.
And don’t get me wrong. I wouldn’t trade my job for anything on the planet.

The fact that I get to make my own schedule, make my own decisions, make my own money and make a measurable difference in the world – all while doing what I love – is an honor and a privilege.

But.

When the inevitable loneliness starts to creep in like a toxic mist, we need every ounce of our creative capacity to stay connected, stay supported and stay afloat. Otherwise the isolation will drive us insane, and will drive our businesses into the ground.

Thank god for the nametag. It keeps me connected. It sustains me. It’s my constant spark for human contact. And every day I get to interact with cool new people from all walks of life that I never would have met otherwise.

It’s my analog friend request.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What's yours?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "58 Questions about Questions" send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.

Now booking for 2011-2012!

Watch The Nametag Guy in action here!

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

NametagTV: Touchy Feely



If you want to reach the world.
If you want to make a name for yourself.
If you want to win with the people who matter most.

You have to use your hand, and you have to use your heart.

And I know what you’re thinking.

Great. Is he going to get all touchy feely now?

Yes.

That’s exactly what’s going to happen, because that’s exactly what people crave.

To feel like they’ve been touched.

How many of your people don’t feel touched?
How many of your people don’t feel at all?

AND JUST SO YOU KNOW: I’m not suggesting you start hugging everyone you meet.

Nor am I suggesting you formulate a touchpoint strategy for managing the customer experience that aligns with the brand promise. Excuse me while I vomit.

Being touchy feely is much bigger – and better – than that. It’s about leaving people feeling seen, heard and essential. Today we’re going to talk how to make yourself, your brand and your organization more touchy feely:
1. Give people the experience of psychological visibility. You look with the eyes, but you see with the heart. And if you want to assure that you leave people feeling seen, try these ideas. First: Instead of going out of your way to make people feel invisible, make a conscious effort to love, honor and acknowledge them. When they get you, give them all of you.

Second: While engaging with people, resist the urge to check your email. Stop looking over their shoulder to see if there’s somebody more important to talk to you. Just be with the people you’re with, right now. Third: When someone comes to you with their problems, understand that they’re not looking for advice – they’re looking for understanding. Don’t dispense answers when they’re looking for affirmation.

Nothing touches people more than your willingness to be a mirror. When was the last time you slowed down and noticed people?

2. Be open to all levels of intimacy. I recently read the classic article in Harvard Business Review that first called customer intimacy a “key value discipline.” Their research proved that organizations that align their entire operating model to serve that discipline are the ones who become market leaders. Are you pushing yourself relentlessly to sustain it? If not, you’ll never touch your people in the way they need to be touched.

After all, each of your relationships – from customers you’ve known since day one to prospects you’ve known since this morning – is an ongoing laboratory of learning how to love. And it’s more than memorizing a few pieces of personal information. Intimacy is about sharing vulnerability, showing feelings and showering acceptance. It’s about weathering storms together, experiencing meaningful connection and creating emotional closeness. What would be different if that described the relationships you had with your customers?

3. Slow down. You can touch what you can’t catch. And you can’t feel what you can’t follow. If you want others to have a warmer, richer experience when they’re around you, learn to pump the brakes. Shift into neutral if you have to. Otherwise you’ll continue borrowing from approachability to fund velocity. And whatever meager dividends remain will leave people feeling untouched.

A helpful question to ask throughout your day is, “Why am I rushing?” Odds are, you won’t come up with a good answer. You might not slow down right away. But this friendly mental disruption will create a newfound awareness. And before you know it, communicating with you will become a more relaxing experience. Remember: When people come into contact with you, it should be emotionally rewarding – not physically draining.

Haste doesn’t make waste – it makes people feel ignored. What elements of your daily routine could be slower?

4. Bring people center stage. I love hearing the word no. Not because it’s an opening to sell, but because it’s an opportunity to hear somebody’s story. Because sometimes that’s all people want – an audience. Someone to champion their humanity. Someone to gather with them and say, “I’m here. I’m with you. I’m part of this.”

The secret is: If you truly want to touch someone, it’s not enough to request their story. You also have to receive it, respect it and retell it. Otherwise they may as well be winking in the dark. That’s what I love about blogging: It provides a public forum where I can bring other people’s story center stage. Often without their knowledge, but never without their acknowledgment.

In my experience, this is the perfect way to use technology for getting touchy feely. As long as you treat people’s truth accurately and respectfully, they’ll never feel untouched. People can’t live without a story to tell. How often you handing them the microphone?

5. Hold up your homework. When my friends Laszlo and Kelly got married, they wrote their own vows. Their words were beautiful, romantic and heartfelt. Not a dry eye in the house. But the collective heart of the entire room stopped beating when Laszlo made the following announcement right after they kissed: “Ladies and gentleman, we’re going to take a ten minute break before the reception starts because, frankly, those vows took everything we had.”

And rightly so, too. Doing something that touching isn’t easy. But the lesson learned is: When something takes everything you have, tell people. Not to boast about how strong you are. But to offer validation that they are people worth caring about, showing up for and giving yourself away to. When was the last time you went out of your way to tell someone that you went out of your way?

REMEMBER: Every day our world becomes less humane in our treatment of each other.

I know touchy feely isn’t easy.
I know touchy feely isn’t for everybody.

But it sure beats avoidy ignory.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Who are you touching?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For a list called, "7 Ways to Out Experience the Competition," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Entrepreneur, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Sick of selling?
Tired of cold calling?
Bored with traditional prospecting approaches?


Buy Scott's book and learn how to sell enable people to buy!

Pick up your copy (or a case!) right here.

Monday, October 10, 2011

What My Nametag Taught Me About Entrepreneurship

After four thousand days of wearing a nametag, I’ve learned more lessons about being an entrepreneur than I ever could have learned in college.

Straight from my column on monthly column on American Express Open Forum, here are a few to consider:
1. Interaction is the agent of human decision. Any time people decide to listen to, buy from, get behind, partner with or tell others about you, it’s probably because of the interaction they had with you. How they experienced you. How they experienced themselves in relation to you. And fortunately, the cost of interaction is approaching zero. Thanks to the Internet, we now have greater access to each other than ever before.

Brands are reaching users. Writers are reaching readers. Artists are reaching collectors. Leaders are reaching followers. But you don’t need a nametag. You need to be open to what can emerge from every interaction. You need to interact with people in praise of whatever they have to offer. You need to approach everyone you encounter with a spirit of acknowledgment. Because every time you interact with people, you make a choice.

A choice to engage with swift responsiveness, nonstop gratitude, unexpected honesty, exquisite playfulness and loving unfairness. Those aren’t just interactions – they’re social gifts. And they change people forever. Are you known for a unique way of interacting with the world?

2. The media is your customer. I once got an email from a television screenwriter. He wanted to pitch a network reality show that revolved around my nametag. Awesome. But I had to ask the crucial question. I had to find out why he picked me. Not for ego purposes, but for market research purposes. I wanted to know where the rock created the ripple so I could go throw more rocks.

“Television is about the personality and the message, somebody who would be fun to watch every episode. Viewers don’t care about talent and skill. They want to laugh, be entertained and have their imagination captured. And after doing a lot of research on potential, I didn’t like anyone else. But you – you remind me of me. And that’s why I reached out.”

Cool. So we did a few conference calls, got the lawyers involved, signed an option agreement – I even flew out to Hollywood to meet with a few network producers. Unfortunately, the screenwriter got an offer to become a lead a writer on Survivor, the highest rated reality show of the decade. Damn you, Jeff Probst!

And I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t disappointed. But I wasn’t devastated. If anything, it was another glimpse into that whole world. It was an educational experience that taught me what the network wants. That’s one thing you learn about working with the media: You can’t get your hopes up. You can’t beat yourself up. And you can’t torture yourself waiting in limbo. Nor can you run around telling everyone you’re going to be on television.

The media is your customer, and you are an ocean under a fickle moon. You just have to keep saying to yourself, “It’s only a matter of time.” When it hits, will you be ready?

3. Enable the mystery. “I just have so many questions!” I get that a lot. When people find out I wear a nametag everyday, they’re instantly curious about a number of issues. And I’m happy to oblige. Comes with the territory. I once met a guy in a jazz club in Hell’s Kitchen. Noticing my nametag, he asked me if I had just come from an episode of The Price is Right. Good guess, but no. Even though I’ve always secretly wanted to be on that show. Just let me play one game of Plinko and I’ll be out of your way.

Anyway, the point is that people are enthralled by mystery. They never grow tired of things that invite constant interpretation. And your ability to fascinate them is a tremendous asset. Like Houdini, you have to emanate an aura of delightful unpredictability. You have leave the public always wanting more, wondering about your next move. Will you underestimate the profitability of mystery?

4. Reputational capital. The first interview I ever did was for Headline News. Three minutes. Five million people. Twenty-two years old. Yikes. I don’t remember much about my segment. I’m sure I rambled like a pro. But what I do remember was rushing home to watch the tape. And the moment that would be forever burned into my brain was noticing what CNN wrote on their lower third screen graphic: Scott Ginsberg, Name Tag Wearer.

And there it is. Four years of college. Thanks, mom and dad. Money well spent. But I learned something that day. You can’t outsource reputation. It’s not what’s in a name – it’s what after a name that counts. And if you don’t make a name for yourself, somebody will make one for you. Nametag Wearer. Sheesh. What would be written under your name?

5. Take a stand. I believe in having a point of view. Philosophies. Opinions. Perspectives. Theories. These things matter. These things make us uniquely human. They don’t have to be right or wrong, they just have to be ours. And it’s our responsibility to share them courageously and prodigiously. Otherwise we’re just decorations on the wall.

That’s what my friend Matt likes to remind me: You weren’t wearing a sticker – you were taking a stand. Damn right I was. I was taking a stand for my identity. I was taking a stand against anonymity. I was taking a stand in the name of approachability. When you do this, people notice. It draws them in. It teaches them how to treat you. And it reminds them that you’re a person with feelings and you demand to be heard.

Life’s too short to keep our doubts to ourselves, too important to keep our positions unknown and too beautiful to keep our conclusions quiet. Opinionated is the new black. Are you wearing it well?

REMEMBER: To be an entrepreneur is to take a risk.

You don’t need to wear a nametag – but you do need to stick yourself out there.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What's your nametag?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For a list called, "11 Ways to Out Google Your Competitors," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

“I usually refuse to pay for mentoring. But after Scott’s first brain rental session, the fact that I had paid something to be working with him left my mind – as far as I was concerned, the value of that (and subsequent) exchange of wisdom and knowledge, far outweighed any payment."

--Gilly Johnson The Australian Mentoring Center

Friday, October 07, 2011

Everything I Know About Marketing I Learned From My Nametag

I’ve been wearing a nametag for four thousand consecutive days.

More importantly, I’ve turned that quest into a career as a writer, publisher, speaker, consultant and artist.

In the process, I’ve learned a lot of valuable lessons. From my monthly column on American Express Open Forum, here are a few to consider:
1. It’s not a nametag – it an advertisement. I used to think advertising was cool. When I was a kid, my favorite hobby was perusing and analyzing the pullout ads from Saturday morning newspaper. Then I went to business school. And I learned that advertising is a disrespectful, ugly form of pollution. Then I started my own company. And I learned that advertising is the price that companies pay for not having enough friends.

Years later, I came to a conclusion: We don’t need more advertisements – we need acts that create emotional connections. Simple, inclusive, accessible, relevant and human encounters that change the momentary experience of engaging with your brand. Another reason I love nametags. Instead of interrupting – I’m interacting. Instead of demanding attention – I’m offering permission. Instead of bothering people into buying from me – I’m allowing them to target me. Is your marketing like that?

2. It’s not a nametag – it’s attention. When I attend classes, teachers call on me more. When I take yoga, instructors adjust my posture more. When I dine out, waiters seat me quicker, treat me nicer and serve me faster. This is not an accident. I’m just slightly more memorable than the average person. And as a result, I earn more attention than most. The nametag builds novelty, overrides people’s native defenses, breaks the ice, creates a smile in the mind and tickles the eye. It reduces psychological distance, expedites familiarity, pampers people’s memories, creates a human connection and accelerates intimacy.

It’s a social object. And every day it makes another deposit in my attention account. Do I wear a nametag for attention? You’re damn right I do. Attention is the great commodity. It’s the scarcest resource we have. How do you practice earning it every day?

3. It’s not a nametag – it’s engagement. I never leave the house without nametags. It’s my uniform. It’s my armor. Ever ready for battle. And everywhere I go, people ask me if they can have one. So I’m happy to pass them out to strangers, friends, random kids at the ballpark, whomever. I don’t discriminate. But I don’t pass them out to convert people – I pass them out to send a message: My brand is participatory.

Personally, I don’t care if people wear the nametags. A lot of them don’t. What matters is that they join me that spontaneous moment of authentic human interaction, infused with a sprit of humor, playfulness and connection. That’s my brand. And their life is better because of it. Truth is, brand perception hinges on human interaction. The only thing people can make a judgment about is how engaging with you makes them feel. And every encounter you have with another person either adds to – or subtracts from – its overall joinability. How do you induce participation?

4. It’s not a nametag – it’s execution. When people learn that I’ve made entire career out of wearing a nametag everyday, they often comment: “Damn it! Now why didn’t I think of that?” Wrong question. Because odds are, they probably did think of that. They just didn’t do anything about it. They forgot to attach action to the idea. It’s not about the idea – it’s about the “I did.”

Of course, people are too busy. Too busy being patient, waiting for permission, following rules, setting goals, fearing failure, planning, responding to useless distractions, listening to the wrong feedback, attending meetings, working with counterproductive teams, waiting until they’re ready, waiting until they know what they’re doing, waiting for perfection and wasting time with parade rainers. And that’s why nobody executes what matters.

Execution isn’t a skill – it’s a way of life. It’s a predisposition to action, an adamant refusal to stay where you are and an outright insistence on focusing on what’s most important to you. The world doesn’t need another idea guy. Ideas are free – only execution is priceless. Which are you focused on?

REMEMBER: We all wear nametags. Every day.

Your challenge is to figure out what’s written on yours.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What's your nametag?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For a list called, "11 Ways to Out Google Your Competitors," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

“I usually refuse to pay for mentoring. But after Scott’s first brain rental session, the fact that I had paid something to be working with him left my mind – as far as I was concerned, the value of that (and subsequent) exchange of wisdom and knowledge, far outweighed any payment."

--Gilly Johnson The Australian Mentoring Center

Thursday, October 06, 2011

When Steve Jobs Freed Us

Sometimes you have to say no to the good so you can say yes to the best.

Steve Jobs taught me that.

In a recent interview with Fortune, he made a similar distinction:

“People think focus means saying yes to the thing you’ve focus on. But that’s not what it means at all. It means saying no to the hundred other good ideas that there are. You have to pick carefully.

You’re defined by what you decline.

Doesn't make you close-minded, inflexible or stiff.

Just focused.

And when you focus yourself, you free yourself.
And when you free yourself, you free the world.

Thank you, Steve Jobs for freeing us.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
How did Steve Jobs affect you?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "18 Lessons from 18 People Smarter Than Me," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.

Now booking for 2011-2012!

Watch The Nametag Guy in action here!

Wednesday, October 05, 2011

Stomaching the Fear of Disconnection

Last week I shared a shuttle with a flight attendant. She was complaining about young people’s inability to shut off their phones right before takeoff.

“It’s only a two-hour flight. You’d think it was the end of the world for these kids!”

Oh, but it is. Considering the average teenager uses the Internet fifty hours a week -- seventy percent of which are on their mobile devices – two hours is like an eternity.
You have to experience time from their perspective.

The other issue is, it’s not that they can’t stop playing with their phones. It’s that they can’t stomach the fear of disconnection.

Always on is all they know.

To them, the off button may as well be the Grim Reaper’s doorbell.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
How long does two hours really feel to you?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "58 Questions about Questions" send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.

Now booking for 2011-2012!

Watch The Nametag Guy in action here!

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

What My Stalker Taught Me

If you have to tell someone you’re not a stalker, you probably are.

I learned this the hard way.

His named was Stephan.
He was a fan of my work.
And he called me every day.

Every. Single. Day. For three weeks.

Did I mention he was a middle-aged unemployed alcoholic with social anxiety disorder whose father abused him physically, sexually and emotionally?

He told me these things. On his voicemail messages. Along with the disclaimer that he swore he wasn’t a stalker.

HELLO, my name is Creepy.

I changed my number.
Took it off my website.
And thought that would be the end of it.
Until he showed up at my house.

I was taking out the trash – wearing my nametag, of course – when I saw what looked like a homeless guy hanging out by the dumpster.

He said my name.
He reached out his right hand.
He held his other hand behind his back.

And I was thinking: Ice pick.

But instead, he pulled out copy of my book.

He didn’t want to kill me – he just wanted an autograph.

I took his pen and signed it. Kind of. I was so terrified I think I wrote, “Best wishes! Love, Jamal.”

But that was it. He said thanks, walked away and I never saw him again.

And as I went inside to change my underwear, something occurred to me:

If you don’t set boundaries for yourself – other people will set them for you.

And then they will violate them.
And then they will tell all their little friends to violate them.
And it will be your fault because you never decided where to draw the line.

It is possible to be too approachable.

In addition to stalkers, over the years I’ve had cult members try to covert me, drug dealers try to sell me, religious zealots try to proselytize me and pyramid schemers try to recruit me. All the time.

Because that’s what happens when you put yourself out there.

Don’t wait until you’re defenseless to learn this lesson.

Decide where you draw the line early.

And the minute somebody tries to push you past it, run.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
What boundaries are you setting?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "10 Ways to Make the Mundane Memorable," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.

Now booking for 2011-2012!

Watch The Nametag Guy in action here!

Monday, October 03, 2011

The Profitability of Commitment

My generation is typecast as being afraid of commitment.

The consensus is that we’re impatient, have mediocre work ethic, don’t offer loyalty easily and are quick to quit and pursue something better.

Is that an accurate description? Doesn’t matter.

What matters is that commitment is unquestionable.

That’s why I got a tattoo of the nametag on my chest.

Not a marker. Not temporary ink. Not the sticker on my skin. Tried all those already.

A real tattoo. The kind that doesn’t come off.
It symbolizes my commitment to my truth, my name, my identity, my brand, my philosophy and my life purpose.

And it hurt like hell.

But while the needle hurt my chest for an hour, not being taken seriously would’ve hurt my career for a lifetime.

And when people ask me if the tattoo is real, I say:

“It’s as real as my commitment.”

What’s interesting is, when I got my tattoo, that was right around the time my company finally starting making money.

Huh.

I guess when you commit with both feet, the world doesn’t just pay attention – it pays dividends.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
How committed are you?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For the list called, "17 Behaviors to Avoid for Effective Listening," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.

Now booking for 2011-2012!

Watch The Nametag Guy in action here!