Tuesday, September 06, 2011

Why I Would Make a Terrible Criminal

“But if you wear a nametag all the time, doesn’t that mean you have to be nice to everyone?”

That’s the point.

Wearing a nametag paints me into an accountable corner.

And that it makes it very difficult to be disrespectful to people. Especially strangers.

I’m reminded of a nightmare I had about seven years ago.

In the dream, I had murdered someone. I was on the run from the cops. But for some idiotic reason, I thought it would be a good idea to stop for a Slurpee.

Rookie mistake.
When I approached the counter to pay, the cashier was watching the news. And sure enough, on the screen was a picture of me, my nametag and a graphic that said, “Convicted Killer.”

It didn’t take long for him to put two and two together. By the time I walked out of the store, cop cars, officers, helicopters and Tommy Lee Jones were waiting to take me in.

So much for my career as a criminal.

Fortunately, wearing a nametag is a construct. It’s something I put in place that limits me to only practicing positive behavior. It takes away all my choices. And it permanently positions me in a situation where acting in accordance with my values is the only plausible course of action.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What structure could you install to bankrupt bad behavior?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
For a list called, "11 Ways to Out Google Your Competitors," send an email to me, and you win the list for free!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Publisher, Artist, Mentor
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

“I usually refuse to pay for mentoring. But after Scott’s first brain rental session, the fact that I had paid something to be working with him left my mind – as far as I was concerned, the value of that (and subsequent) exchange of wisdom and knowledge, far outweighed any payment."

--Gilly Johnson The Australian Mentoring Center