Thursday, July 16, 2009

6 Little Known Ways to Elevate Your Entrepreneurial Edge

1. Decide how impatient you can afford to be. Being impatient might be the smartest decision your company could ever make. My first suggestion is to write the following two words on a sticky note: Just Go. That’s it. Just go.

Be willing to look bad on the road to immortality. Plunge forward plan-less. And stop allowing the need for perfection to preventing you from doing, being and having what you want. Take action on your new idea swiftly. Find out what ONE step you could take NOW to start moving forward to your ideal future. How much money is being (too) patient costing you?

2. Document as you develop. Writing makes everything you do easier and better. Not to mention, if you don’t write it down, it never happened. Whether it’s an idea, a process or a mind map for your next project, keeping records of your creative initiatives always serves you well.

First, it enables you to repeat your process. Secondly, it helps you improve your process. And lastly, it assists you in teaching your process, either to coworkers or customers. What did you write today?

3. Decide what it will take to become a proven entity. That might mean a stronger web presence. That might mean a more robust networking plan. That might mean securing a spot as a regular contributor to an online publication read by your perfect clients.

That might mean getting up an hour earlier every morning to write, accumulate enough content to blog five times a week and slowly expand your thought leadership platform. Just remember: Your strategy for sticking yourself out there needs to be as remarkable as WHAT you’re sticking out there. To whom do you need to become a proven entity to?

4. Help customers visualize the end result. The benefit of the benefit of the benefit. Not a rental car – getting the hell out of the airport. Not a Happy Meal – shutting the damn kids up. Not a deep tissue massage – an escape from your stressful world.

The secret behind this principle is to visually represent this end result to the customer. Take Pizza Hut, for example. Do you think their website is just a bunch of pictures of pies? No way. You see images of families at home, sitting around the dinner table, laughing, sharing and relaxing. The pizza is just a prop. What are you the answer to?

5. Make sure you don’t lose your entrepreneurial edge. Return to your roots. Uncover your beginnings. Ask yourself these questions:

*Why did you get into business in the first place?
*What would you do if you were starting your business all over again right now?
*What injustice did you set out to fight when you first started your business?

If you can’t answer those questions, either execute a plan for recovering your edge or be smart and quit. How much of your entrepreneurial edge have you lost since you started?

6. Offer less. Choice saturation paralyzes people into inaction. Even the simple act of choosing caused mental fatigue. What’s more, the longer customers they take, the less they buy.

Thus: Complexity generates contemplation, and contemplation kills sales. Because a confused mind never buys. What if you gave people ZERO choice to eliminate customer frustration remove the threat of rejection?

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
How are you elevating your entrepreneurial edge?

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Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
Author, Speaker, Coach, Entrepreneur
scott@hellomynameisscott.com

Never the same speech twice.
Always about approachability.

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