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Sunday, September 30, 2007

How to read a book, pt. 2

(For part one in this series, click here!)

1. First of all. Never “read” any book. Study it.

2. Value. A book is an investment in yourself. It’s yours. So, don’t lend it out to ANYBODY. Not even your mom.

3. Personalize. Write, highlight, annotate and mark up that book like you were studying for med school finals. When you personalize a book, it becomes priceless. Even if it’s just one key phrase. This also makes it easier to recopy your notes later. What’s more, writing stuff and underlining and keys ideas increases retention.

4. Memories. When you return to your book a week, a month or a year later, you will thank yourself for circling key points. Almost like creating your own cliff notes! And don’t just underline or circle a passage – comment and explain WHY you picked that particular phrase, i.e., “Great point! Just like my friend Bobby!” This becomes a fascinating window into your thinking patterns at the time.

5. Creativity. While reading, other ideas WILL come to you. And, since ideas are you major source of income, you need to capture them! Either in the margins or on a separate sheet of paper, WRITE-YOUR-NEW-IDEAS-DOWN. Because if you don’t write them down, they never happened.

6. Recopy. Reading the book is only half the battle. The second step is to go back through your book and recopy the key ideas or phrases onto a Summary Document. Save these notes into a folder called “Book Notes” and keep it handy. This creates an accessible reference to be used forever!

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How do you read a book?

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Share your tips here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Saturday, September 29, 2007

How to addict yourself to writing

The secret to writing is to addict yourself to it.

Now, I admit: there’s nothing more terrifying than facing a blank page.

Even Shakespeare and Steven King would agree to that!

But, if you can get yourself addicted to writing, writer’s block will become an impossibility.

See, I’ve been writing professionally now for about five years.

And while that doesn’t mean I’ve discovered all of the secrets, I HAVE figured out a three-step process to get addicted to writing:

THE FIRST STEP IS THE HARDEST: just start writing.

Even if you don’t think you’re any good.
Even if you don’t think you have anything good to write about.

If you have to, write about “not having anything to write about” until you think of something to write about.

Do this for a (measly) fifteen minutes a day.

THE SECOND STEP IS THE LONGEST: give it time.

Depending on your style, schedule and goals, this could take anywhere from several weeks to several months to several years.

The secret is to be patient.

To be willing to pay the price.

That way, you become (slowly) addicted to writing.

And in the process, develop a tailor-made system that suits your creative style.

THE THIRD STEP IS THE COOLEST: embrace your addiction!

See, as you get into your daily writing routine, you’ll notice something.

I call it The Circle of Write:

1. The more you write, the more you will LIKE writing.
2. The more you like writing, the more you will WANT to write.
3. The more you want to write, the more THOUGHT you will put into your writing.
4. The more thought you put into your writing, the BETTER your writing will become.
5. The better your writing becomes, the HIGHER your confidence will soar.
6. The higher your confidence soars, the MORE you will like writing.
7. The more you like writing, the more you will WANT to write...

And so on.

The circle just keeps on going.

Let us all chant, Hakuna-matata!

AND HERE’S THE BEST PART: once you reach this point, the better you will feel when you write.

Which means the WORSE you will feel when you DON’T write.

And THAT is how you will know when you’re addicted.

When you can’t (not) write.

After all, if “writing is the basis of all wealth,” wouldn’t YOU want get addicted to it?

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How did YOU get addicted to writing?

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Share your addiction tips here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Friday, September 28, 2007

...but you didn't

The most common piece of criticism I receive is:

“Scott, wearing a nametag is not a unique idea. I could have done that!”

And I always respond with the same two comments.

Number one:

You know what? You’re right: you probably COULD have done that.

But you didn’t.

And number two:

You know what? You’re (also) right: wearing a nametag is not a unique idea.

But if you think this whole thing is about wearing a nametag, you’ve haven't been listening.

Because it’s not about the idea – it’s how you leverage it.

See, ideas are free.

But execution is priceless.

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What's your best quotation on leveraging?

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Share it here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Thursday, September 27, 2007

Is your nametag too crowded?

“Hey Scott, why do you choose to wear the simple, hand-written, first-name-only nametags? Why not get something more customized and permanent?”

Well, I guess it HAS been a while since I riffed on nametags.

Over the years I've been asked this question SO many times that I have several answers:

1. It’s pure, human and friendly. And most importantly, it’s simple. Not to mention, you’re immediately on a first name basis … with everyone!

2. It’s enough. Sigmund Freud proved that a person’s name is the single context of human memory most forgotten. So, putting your first AND last name on the nametag is almost like asking someone to remember too much.

3. It eliminates preoccupations, conclusions and stereotypes. If your nametag indicates your last name, company name or job title, people are going to prejudge you based on this information. This may result in them NOT approaching you, i.e., if they were recently screwed over by someone from the same company or have had poor experiences with people who work in your field.

4. It’s self-disclosing. Writing ONLY your first name encourages an exchange of (minimal) person information and builds an instant connection. For example, in all the years of wearing my nametag, thousands of complete strangers have just come to me and instantly introduced themselves. Without asking. They just did it because of the norm of reciprocity inherent in interpersonal communication. Wow!

5. It limits the PSD’s, or Potential Silent Dialogues. If you see someone’s nametag that says nothing but “Jack,” the only assumption you can make is, “That guy’s name is Jack,” as opposed to, “He looks like a salesman, don’t go near him.” Associations and churches are notorious for screwing this up by indicating board positions, years of membership, etc. Dude, who cares? Why can't we just connect as people, not as designations?

6. It puts the person first. Believe it or not, not everyone is defined by his job. And not everyone feels the need to ask, “So, what do YOU do?” ten seconds after meeting someone new. So, that’s the beauty of a plain, vague nametag: it leads with your person. Humanity before statistics. Values before vocation. Personality before position. WHO YOU ARE … before what you do and where you work.

7. It removes yourself as a threat. Nametags instantly and constantly reveal your personal information to everyone around you. This foregoes your anonymity. Which creates instant accountability for your actions. Which proves you’re comfortable in your own skin. Which immediately makes you less threatening to others. THINK ABOUT IT: would you mug somebody if you were wearing a nametag?

8. It detaches from outcomes. The simplicity of your nametag shows that you’re not goal oriented. You’re not selling, marketing or networking. You’re not attending a conference. You’re not trying to convert people. All you’re doing is giving yourself away. Sticking yourself out there. Making other people feel comfortable. That’s it.

FINAL POINT: I’ve been wearing a nametag 24-7 for the past 2,521 days. And if there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that people crave simplicity.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Is your nametag too crowded?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Next time you are required to wear a nametag, make it as simple, basic, pure and minimal as possible.

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Wednesday, September 26, 2007

How to convince yourself that you actually hav a real job, pt. 2

(Read the first post in this series here!)

Being an entrepreneur can be a LONELY profession.

Especially if you work out of your home.

After all…

You have no office.
You have no coworkers.
You have no sense of community.

And sometimes, it just sucks!

SO, THAT'S THE CHALLENGE: learning how to protect yourself against potential solitude.

Here’s a collection of tips to help convince yourself that you actually have a real job:

1. Meetings. Set regular lunches, coffees and meetings throughout the week. You don’t have to have one every day – a few per week should keep you sane. Meet with colleagues who work in similar or complimentary industries. Share your troubles, brainstorm ideas and exchange goals.

2. Hangouts. Find out if there’s a local bar, club or coffee shop where people who do what you do hang out. Visit often. Get to know some of the regulars. If you want, you can even start a hangout of your own! Check online or in local papers to see what’s out there.

3. Join Up! Become a member of the local chapter of your professional association. Attend meetings regularly. Consider taking a leadership position. Pick the brains of the veterans and welcome in the newbies.

4. Virtual Lunches. Have regular virtual lunches with out of town colleagues. Agree upon a convenient time to eat and chat over the phone together. This technique is especially helpful if you travel or have a national or international network.

5. Social Networking. Seek out other online options: user groups, message boards, teleconferences, blogs, social networking sites and other community building tools. REMEMBER: whatever you’re into, at least 1000 other people on the Internet will be into it too!

6. Mastermind Group. Gather 3-5 people who work in the same industry as you. Meet every month. Set goals, keep each other accountable, share failures and successes, and of course, celebrate!

ONE LAST POINT: be grateful.

DIY is a lonely road. Be sure you’re constantly thanking people for their time. Show them you appreciate the relationship and will do what you can to keep it alive.

Ultimately, you’ll be able to generate a sense of camaraderie that is ABSOLUTELY necessary to your survival as an entrepreneur.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
How do you convince yourself that you actually have a real job?

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Share your best ideas here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Tuesday, September 25, 2007

How far do your thoughts travel?

Edward DeBono once said, “The measure of a great thinker is how far his thoughts travel.”

I call this “Idea Reach.”

And if you’re a creative professional, thought leader or entrepreneur, know this:


The farther your ideas go, the more your business will grow.

Now, if you want to figure out how far YOUR thoughts travel, the first thing you’ve got to do is take stock. Consider these self-assessment questions:

1. How many subscribers do you have?
2. What different countries do your website hits come from?
3. When was the last time you got an email from a complete stranger across the world that read something you wrote?
4. When was the last time you did an interview on a radio station outside of your hometown?
5. When was the last time you were recognized in a city outside of your hometown?
6. When was the last time your work was published in a widely circulated print publication?
7. When was the last time you were pinged on a blog you never heard of until your Google Alerts told you?
8. When was the last time you got an instant message from someone in China?
9. How often are you receiving unsolicited leads or fan mail from customers outside of your typical industry?
10. When was the last time you met someone who said, “Yeah, I’ve heard of you before…”

These questions should give you a solid primer for your Idea Reach.

Still, there’s one more secret…

You must MONITOR how far your thoughts travel.

Here are two suggestions for doing so:

1. Use The Google. Do regular keyword searches on your name, company name, website, philosophies and product titles. Find out who’s talking about you. Also, sign up for Google Alerts immediately. If you don’t know what that is, just Google it.

2. Keep Record. Create a WOM journal that tracks every single time you were talked about online. You might also keep a separate journal chronicling emails, instant messages, phone calls and personal encounters that tell you how far your thoughts travel.

By combing these questions and measuring tools, you’ll develop a better understanding of your Idea Reach.

REMEMBER: anonymity is your greatest barrier to business success.

The farther your ideas go, the more your business will grow.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
How far do your ideas travel?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Start your Idea Reach Journal Today. Email scott@hellomynameisscott.com with your best Idea Reach experience!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Monday, September 24, 2007

Hear The Nametag Guy on the Marketing Monday Podcast!

Just finished an interview with my new friend, Dean Jackson, from Marketing Monday.


We had great discussion about one of my favorite topics, PERMISSION.

In sales.
In marketing.
In conversation.

You can read the transcript or download the MP3!

Enjoy!

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What's your best Marketing Monday tip?

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Post it here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Sunday, September 23, 2007

Things I Don't Understand, Pt. 2


PICTURE THIS: you get an email from someone you’ve never met.

Let’s say his name is Matt.

He's read your blog.
He introduces himself.
He tells you what he does for a living.
Then he asks you to check out his website (if you have time).

Perfectly fine, right?

Nothing wrong with reaching out to someone new!

But.

THEN, let’s say Matt asks, “Could you please blog about my website?”

How would that make you feel?

- - -

Now, if it were me, I’d feel curious.

Curious why someone would have to ASK another person to spread word of mouth about his idea.

AFTER ALL: if an idea was sticky, cool, remarkable and word-of-mouth-worthy, people wouldn’t NEED to be asked to spread the word, right?

KNOW THIS: people are going to tell their friends about your stuff because they connect with it, because there’s an easy story to share and because it’s remarkable.

Not because you asked them to.

In fact, asking might even work against you.

Asking might cause someone to think you’re DES-PER-ATE.

That maybe your idea isn’t worth spreading.

“Well now that he ASKED me to spread the word about his idea, I’m not going to!” someone thinks.

Now, I fully believe that the answer to every question you DON'T ask is no.

Nothing wrong with asking for referrals.

However.

People don’t want to be told what to talk about. They want to decide on their own.

That’s what makes word of mouth the #1 marketing medium on the planet.

Because it’s proactive.
Because it’s authentic.
Because it’s unsolicited.

And yet, businesspeople continue to say things like:

*Please forward this email!
*Could you check out my site and blog it?
*We love referrals!
*Please give this extra copy to someone who might be interested in my services!
*Send this to 10 of your friends!
*Can you pass this on to everyone on your mailing list?

Stop. Please.

Put your tongue back into your mouth. You’re getting slobber all over me.

DON’T: focus on asking people to spread the word for you.

DO: concentrate on making your ideas, products and services self-evident. Build remarkability into them ahead of time.

That way, you won’t HAVE to ask.

People will just do it.

- - -

P.S. If you could link this article and post it on your blog, I’d really appreciate it.

Pretty please with sugar on top?

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Do you think WOM need to be solicited?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Think about the last five products or services you told your friends about. Did the company ASK you to do that? Or did you just do it because they rocked?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Saturday, September 22, 2007

Create a portable creative environment

Inspiration comes unannounced.

And if you don’t write it down, it never happened.

SO, HERE’S THE SECRET: create a portable creative environment.



My new favorite creativity Big Shot is Mihály Csíkszentmihályi. (Try saying THAT one three times fast!)

Anyway, he says, "Shape your immediate surroundings so as to feel in harmony with the small segment of the universe in which you happen to be located."

So, if you’re a creative professional, you can’t expect to do all of your best work in the office or studio.

You must learn to thrive in many environments.

Here’s a list of tips to help you create on the go!

1. Capture. Keep a jotter or small notebook on your person at all times. It’s five bucks and probably the biggest lifesaver for idea capturing in the WORLD. Also, Zebra makes a contractible pen for easy storage.

2. Prepare. Keep books, tapes, pictures and other inspirational material everywhere. On coffee tables, in your car or bag, even in the bathroom! Make a list of all the places you might be stuck for a few minutes. Assure that each of them has SOMETHING to motivate your melon.

3. Commutes. If you take public transportation regularly, make a Creativity Travel Kit. Include writing tools, blank paper, books on brain-building, inspirational materials, music and a few protein-based snacks.

4. Car. Great ideas often come behind the wheel. Be ready to capture them with easily accessible tools like notepads or audio recorders. NOTE: be careful when getting creative while driving. Your new idea won’t do you any good if you’re stuck in the hospital!

5. Visits. If you’re a regular visitor or overnight guest at the houses of friends, family members or significant others, be ready. Let them know you’ll be keeping a notebook or small bag at their place, just in case.

6. THREE WORDS: get a laptop.

7. FOUR WORDS: index cards and Sharpies.

8. Backup. If you get a new idea on the road, at work or at any other unexpected time, email or call yourself and leave a message.

The key idea to remember about creating a portable environment is that it’s tailor-made and makes you feel in control.

To quote Mihaly again...

"Regardless of whether the conditions in which they find themselves are luxurious or miserable, creatives must manage to give their surroundings a personal pattern that echoes the rhythm of their thoughts and habits of action. Within this environment of their own making, they can forget the rest of the world and concentrate on pursuing the Muse."

Good luck!

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Where do you create outside of your studio?

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Create your portable creative environment today!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Friday, September 21, 2007

13 reasons to give stuff away for free

1. Because the more you give away for free, the wealthier you will be. Read more about this theory here.

2. Because stuff that you create doesn’t do you any good sitting in a folder on your computer.

3. Because you can let the world be your editor. By sharing your ideas (for free) with lots of people, you will get unexpected, unsolicited feedback on how to improve it.

4. Because the more stuff you have out there for free, the more fans you will create.

5. Because the Internet was founded upon the idea of free. And some things (like information, articles, videos, content,) are so readily available, that if you DON’T have at least SOME stuff for free, people are going to find them elsewhere.

6. Because if you dropped a piano and a plum off of the Empire State Building, which one would hurt more if it hit you? Exactly. The piano. Because More Mass = More Power.

7. Because who’s more of an expert: someone who wrote 12 articles or someone who write 1,200 articles?

8. Because, “The act of giving away our knowledge makes it again fresh in our mind,” says my hero, Julia Cameron.

9. Because it boosts your Google juice.

10. Because it increases the odds of someone NEW reading your stuff, thus earning their loyalty.

11. Because it increases the odds of someone OLD reading your stuff, thus reinforcing their loyalty.

12. Because it delivers multiple forms of value.

13. Because it increases website revisitability.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Why do you give stuff away for free?

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Share your best reasons here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Thursday, September 20, 2007

Who are you creating art for?

Some artists create art for fame.
Some artists create art for money.
Some artists create art for awards.
Some artists create art for getting laid.
Some artists create art for recognition from critics.
Some artists create art for recognition from other artists.
Some artists create art for people who don’t appreciate it.
Some artists create art for the needs and wants of a certain target market.

Here’s what I think:

I THINK … when you care the least; you do the best.

I THINK … when your stakes are lower; your results are higher.

I THINK … when you create for the wrong reasons; you become a dishonest and gluttonous artist.

I THINK … when you create for the right reasons; the world starts paying attention.

I THINK … when you detach from outcomes and just concentrate on the components; you win.

You know, “journey, not destination” stuff.

SO, THAT’S THE BIG QUESTION: who (or what) are you creating for?

I believe that we, as artists, have a few options:

Create for … YOURSELF
Because you love to create.
Because it makes you happy.
Because you can’t NOT create.
Because it’s your calling, your purpose.
Because it’s just something you like to do.
Because sometimes, the theater of the mind is better.
Because it’s your release, your meditation, your spiritual connection.

Create for … THE SAKE OF CREATING
Because creating is healthy.
Because creating is necessary.
Because you’re an artist, and that’s what artists do.
Because making something out of nothing is totally cool.

Create for … THAT WHICH ENABLED YOU
Because usefulness is worship.
Because you have been given a tremendous gift, and to utilize that gift is to honor the giver.
Because God, The Muse, The Higher Power, The Source, The Divine Light or whatever you call it, deserves it.
Because your creative talents came from something bigger, stronger and more powerful than you, and it’s time to give back.

Create for … NOTHING AT ALL
Just because.

I think Dr. George "Running Guy" Sheehan said it best:

“If you are doing something you would do for nothing – then you are on your way to salvation. And if you could drop it in a minute and forget the outcome, you are even further along. And if while you are doing it you are transported into another existence, there is no need for you to worry about the future.”

SO, HERE’S THE DEAL: if you create art, that makes you an artist. Period.

Eliminate the word “for” from your vocabulary.

You don’t need to create FOR anything. Or anyone.

Just create. That’s it.

Grant permission to your authentic voice to sing as loud, as silly, as creative and as original as it wants.

Because usually, that’s when the best stuff comes out.

AND BEWARE: people might not like your work. People might not even care about your work. It might not sell. It might not be as good as your other stuff. It might not be the right time for that particular piece.

Many forms of negative resistance are standing by to throw themselves at you.

So, it only makes sense to detach from outcomes and just CREATE.

For you.
For the sake of creating.
For your Source.
For nothing at all.

Because, even in the worst case scenario; you can always say:

“Whatever. I liked it.”

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Who are you creating art for?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Read Hugh's ebook NOW. That's what inspired me to write this post.

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Wednesday, September 19, 2007

A few things I don't believe in...

I don’t believe in MARKETING.
Sure, I do a lot of stuff that might be considered marketing: blogging, ezines, publicity and articles.

But to me, that’s not marketing.

That’s storytelling.
That’s sharing expertise with fans.
That’s positioning yourse as a resource.
That’s consistently and uniquely sticking yourself out there.

I don’t believe in BRANDING.
Sure, I do a lot of stuff that might be considered branding: answering the phone by saying, “HELLO, my name is Scott,” putting “The Nametag Guy” as my job title and getting my company logo literally branded on my chest.

But to me, that’s not branding.

That’s reputation.
That’s become more of yourself.
That’s articulating your uniqueness.
That’s reinforcing your personal philosophies.
That’s creating an expectation for your clients.

I don’t believe in SELLING.
Sure, I do a lot of stuff that might be considered selling: making phone calls, following up, emailing prospects and having conference calls.

But to me, that’s not selling.

That’s connecting.
That’s delivering value.
That’s being the Tylenol for people’s headaches.
That’s transferring passion and love for a product.

I don’t believe in NETWORKING.
Sure, I do a lot of stuff that might be considered networking: attending conferences, exchanging business cards and meeting people for coffee.

But to me, that’s not networking.

That’s making friends.
That’s brainstorming with like-minded people.
That’s connecting with someone new and developing a mutually valuable relationship

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What do you (not) believe in?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Share your (non) beliefs here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


Are you a friend of The Nametag Network?

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Tuesday, September 18, 2007

35 cultural trends that (should) change the way you do business

1. The Paradox of Choice. There are more choices than ever before – approaching infinite. So, people are just going to pick the best choice. Often times, it’s the first choice. Are you at the top of the list?

2. Time isn’t on your side. There are more thieves of time, attention and mental energy than ever before. You’re not the only important thing in your customers’ lives.

THINK ABOUT THIS: if you stopped advertising, would anybody even notice?

3. Nobody notices normal. Not any more. Now, this doesn’t mean there’s anything WRONG with being normal. However, positioning you, your business and your value as “normal” is like asking prospects to find a needle in a stack of needles.

REMEMBER: our society rewards the exceptional. And those who get noticed get remembered; and those who get remembered get business. Are you noticeable?

4. What? Huh? According to Wikipedia, the human attention span is about six seconds. Can you deliver value and pique someone’s interest in that window of time?

5. Our culture demands specialists. Being well rounded is overrated. More Narrow Focus = More Big Opportunities. Have you picked a lane yet?

6. Confusion. Most of the world does not understand what you do. The majority of service offerings are poorly defined. Plus, there’s a professional mystique to most job titles. So, don’t use jargon that alienates the public. Don’t give them a reason NOT to investigate your industry further. Are you using real, simple language?

7. BEEEEEEEEEEEEEP!!! People are bombarded every day with 3000+ marketing messages and are TIRED of being interrupted. Patience is at an all time low. And customers want music, not noise. Is your marketing interrupting or interacting?

8. It’s a GOTCHA! Culture. People just LOVE to prove others wrong, make them feel and look stupid and point out their inconsistencies. Are you maintaining consistency?

9. The limited window. According to The Wall Street Journal, first impressions are formed in about two seconds. As such, the only thing people can really make judgments about is how you made them feel in those few seconds.

QUESTION: Are you doing everything you possibly can to make this person feel comfortable engaging with you?

10. WOM Wins. Businesses grow because customers tell other customers. Who’s talking about you? And how are you monitoring that?

11. Hurry up! People like brands because they are decision-making shortcuts. What shortcut do you provide?

12. Be the first. The world is competitive, and customers can only pick one. So, people are most likely going to pick the best. What are you the first hit on Google for?

13. Unique, not different. The world is CRYING for uniqueness.

NOTE: that’s not the same thing as being “different.” Different means “to stand out” and unique means “the only one.” Are you the echo or the origin?

14. Perception is reality. It doesn’t matter if you’re the expert; it matters if you’re the PERCEIVED expert. Perception is reality. You need to be the answer to something. What topic are you the go-to-guy for?

15. How do you like me? People either check you on, or check you off. Quickly. And they usually maintain those initial impressions because of an innate desire to maintain consistency with one’s actions.

ASK YOURSELF: Are you non-checkoffable?

16. Don’t sell; enable people to buy. Don’t count on your audience to connect the dots. Grab them by the shirt collar, pull ‘em in close and DELIVER-YOUR-UNIQUE-VALUE. Are you making it really, really obvious?

17. Smarty pants. Because people have access to more information than ever before, customers are smarter than before. How many books did YOU read last year?

18. Transparency is a must. Because of the mass media’s broadcast of corporate scandals, trust is at an all time low, and bullshit meters are at an all time high. Only the authentic survive. And you need to create greater trust on both sides of the sale.

DUDE: What have you done (specifically) in the past 24 hours to enhance your credibility?

19. Preoccupation. Customers need you to give them reasons why they won’t regret purchasing this later. Reinforce their buying decisions right away. How are you disarming buyer’s remorse?

20. Don’t please everybody. No matter what happens, about 10% of the people in the world aren’t going to like you or your ideas. Don’t sweat it. Forget about the 10; stick with the 90. If everybody loves your brand, you’re doing something wrong. Are you polarizing people enough?

21. The Working Hard Myth. People only give you credit for about 10% of the work you do, because 90% of it is never seen. How good is your 90?

22. It’s a MY Culture. Because of the exponential growth of Internet, humans now have instant access to infinite amounts of information. This creates a hyperspeed, infinite-choice society where customers are going to get WHAT they want, WHEN and HOW they want it.

REVERSE YOUR MARKETING: don’t aim; be aimed at.

23. It’s an Eggshell Culture. People are terrified of offending others. We live in a touchy, oversensitive culture resting on the shoulders of a million eggshells. Are you apologizing when you did nothing wrong?

24. Clients need to know they’re getting YOU. Because they don’t trust corporations, they trust PEOPLE. Tangibility, not magnitude. How well do your customers know YOU?

25. Customers crave simplicity. That’s it.

26. Customers are impatient. And they want the best. The ONE. The Guy. The Man. Are you That Guy?

27. Enabling people to buy. Customers are only going to do business with you if they’ve heard you, heard OF you, or someone they TRUST has heard of you. Who’s heard of you?

28. We live in a culture of sales resistance. Consumers are skeptical and require confidence before deciding to buy. They’ve been advertised to, marketed to, duped, fooled, conned, scammed, sold and screwed over too many times. How are you any different than every other salesperson out there?

29. Loyalty is a joke. And here’s why: big companies don’t realize that people aren’t loyal to big companies! They’re loyal to people. Not to mention, it’s not about satisfaction or even loyalty anymore. Those are par for the course. Do customers INSIST on you?

30. Prospects rely on familiarity. Which is good, because familiarity leads to predictability. Predictability leads to trust. And TRUST is foundation of all business. Are you somewhat predictable?

31. IF they want you, they’ll find you. What happens when someone googles YOUR name?

32. Who are you, anyway? People don’t want to hire consultants, speakers, trainers or recruiters. They want to hire smart, cool people who happen to consult. Or speak. Or train. Or recruit. Or whatever. Are you smart and cool?

33. People buy people first. Which means: lead with your person; follow with your profession. Values before vocation. Individuality before industry. Humanity before statistics. Personality before position.

WHICH MEANS: if customers like you, they’ll find a way to buy from you. If customers don’t like you, they’ll find a way NOT to buy from you too.

SO REMEMBER: if they like you as a person, they MIGHT buy from you. But if they don’t like you as a person, they DEFINITELY won’t buy from you. How likable are you?

34. People respond to policies. How do you tell people “how you roll”?

35. The longer they take, the less they buy. And a confused mind never buys. Complexity = Contemplation = Lost sale. How are you expediting your sales cycle?

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What other cultural trends are changing the way we do business?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Add yours to the list!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Monday, September 17, 2007

Who pissed YOU off?

A common thread shared by most successful entrepreneurs and innovators is that they all were, at some point in time, pissed off.

Pissed off at someone.
Pissed off at something.

Not willing to accept the status quo.
Always willing to abandon popular delusions.

Dissatisfied with what they saw around them.
Happy to invest the time, energy and money in finding a better way.

I think Tom Peters said it best in his book Re-Imagine:

“I happen to believe that only pissed-off people change the world!”

Amen!

See, when you’re pissed off, you develop this burning fire in your gut to prove someone (or something) wrong.

To fight against the naysayers, critics, doubters and hecklers.

And in many cases, that’s impetus enough for achieving, inventing and committing to great things.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Who pissed YOU off?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Share how that motivated you to achieve great things!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Sunday, September 16, 2007

Detach from outcomes

When you’re writing…
When you’re creating art…
When you’re brainstorming…

REMEMBER THREE WORDS: detach from outcomes.

For five reasons:

1. When you detach from outcomes, you relax more.
2. When you detach from outcomes, you lower your guard.
3. When you detach from outcomes, you lower other people’s guards.
4. When you detach from outcomes, you produce better quality work.
5. When you detach from outcomes, you lower the stakes and raise the results.

Author and creativity guru Mihály Csíkszentmihályi encourages the same.

He teaches artists, inventors and entrepreneurs to practice something called flow.

“What keeps you motivated is the quality of the experience you feel when you are involved with the activity. Enjoy the process of creation for its own sake.”

What’s more, Csíkszentmihályi’s idea of “flow” describes a person who is autotelic, not exotelic.

o Autotelic means there is there is no reason for doing something except to feel the experience it provides.

o Exotelic means people do things not because they enjoy them, but rather to accomplish a later goal.

So, if you want to produce better quality creative material, strive to be more autotelic.

Love the work more than what it produces.

See, it’s REALLY easy to create for the wrong reasons.

Money. Fame. Ego. Power. Self-validation. Approval.

All are outcomes.

Which doesn’t mean they’re bad things!

They just suggest that your creative process is results-based, not process-based.

SO, HERE’S YOUR CHALLENGE: focus on process, not product.

Verbs, not nouns.
Pursuit, not attainment.
Journey, not destination.

Don’t do it all for the nookie.

Do it because you love doing it.

Detach from outcomes.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Why do you create?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Share your best technique for detaching from outcomes here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Saturday, September 15, 2007

21 ways to get (really) good at writing

1. You get (really) good at writing by writing a lot.

2. You get (really) good at writing by being willing to suck at the beginning.

3. You get (really) good at writing by reading good writing.

4. You get (really) good at writing by reading bad writing.

5. You get (really) good at writing by studying the architecture of pages.

6. You get (really) good at writing sharing your writing with people who are smarter than you who rip your writing apart.

7. You get (really) good at writing by reading everything Julia Cameron has ever written.

8. You get (really) good at writing by writing for the sake of writing, instead of writing for money, fame, increased traffic or sales.

9. You get (really) good at writing by writing every day.

10. You get (really) good at writing by doing your Morning Pages.

11. You get (really) good at writing by (not) planning and just writing.

12. You get (really) good at writing by blogging.

13. You get (really) good at writing by regularly expanding and challenging your creativity.

14. You get (really) good at writing by becoming a better thinker.

15. You get (really) good at writing by discovering your voice.

16. You get (really) good at writing by writing about stuff you like.

17. You get (really) good at writing by learning how to addict yourself to writing.

18. You get (really) good at writing by posting your work on the Web and letting the world be your editor.

19. You get (really) good at writing by observing the world through your creative filter.

20. You get (really) good at writing by not making a big deal about writing.

21. You get (really) good at writing by recognizing that procrastination isn't about laziness, it's about fear.

22. You get (really) good at writing by posting a sticky note on your computer that says, "What did you write today?"

23. You get (really) good at writing by posting a sticky note on your computer that says, "Is everything you know written down somewhere?"

24. You get (really) good at writing by journaling every day.

25. You get (really) good at writing by admitting that writing is the basis of all wealth.

26. You get (really) good at writing by remembering that if you don't write it down, it never happened.

27. You get (really) good at writing by making lots and lots of lists.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
How did you get (really) good at writing?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Finish this sentence five times: "You get (really) good at writing by..." Post your answers here! I'm trying to get the list up to 500 so I can create a free ebook called "500 Ways to Get (Really) Good at Writing." (Full credit will be given for all contributions.)

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Friday, September 14, 2007

Be the bulls-eye, not the arrow

We live in a My Culture.

Here’s why.

Because of the exponential growth of Internet, humans now have instant access to infinite amounts of information.

This creates a hyperspeed, infinite-choice society where people are BOMBARDED by thousands of marketing messages on a daily basis.

Which makes customers' patience dwindle.

Which reduces attention span to about six seconds.

Which ultimately means: customers are going to get WHAT they want, WHEN and HOW they want it.

And there’s nothing you can do about it.

My Culture.

For example, let’s go back to about a decade ago when it all started.

Before Tivo.
Before Google.
Before YouTube.

Remember when Windows 95 came out?

It was SO cool! Especially that little folder called “My Documents.”

Wow! customers thought. MY Documents? All for me! This is great!

And thus began a worldwide trend of false ownership.


MY AOL.
MY music.
MY favorites.
MY homepage.
MY documents.

My, my, my, my, my!

Me, me, me, me, me!

Hence: My Culture.

And there’s not necessarily anything BAD about it.

It’s just a complete reversal from previous generations.

And businesspeople need to recognize this.

See, in the past, the mass media, big companies and worldwide organizations dictated WHAT, WHEN and HOW we got information.

Take TV, for example:

Thursday night? Time for Friends!
Saturday morning? Let’s watch college football!
Sunday evening? Turn on the Simpsons!

That’s how it used to be.

But now, things are reversed.

Now, customers are calling the shots.

*Going out of town on Sunday? No problem! You can just Tivo The Simpsons and watch it (commercial free) on Tuesday afternoon.

*Ran to the bathroom during Peyton Manning’s game-wining Hail Mary pass at the buzzer? No worries! Just pause live TV, go back two minutes and watch it again.

*Missed Gray’s Anatomy last week? Fear not! Hop on to YouTube or www.graysanatomy.com and watch the highlights!

My Culture.

SO, HERE’S THE BIG CHALLENGE: how do you reach customers who already know what they want?

HERE'S THE BIG ANSWER: reverse your marketing.

Stop operating on an old school model.

Don’t sell. ENABLE … customers to buy.
Don’t look. ATTRACT … customers to you.
Don’t push. PULL … customers towards you.

Essentially:

Don’t be the arrow. Be the bull’s-eye.

Let them target YOU.

That’s Reverse Target Marketing: sticking yourself out there and enabling the ideal market target YOU.

Here’s how to do it:

1. Be a big, beautiful, juicy target.
2. Let the market define itself for you.

Then, once you deliver value and stick yourself out there in a unique, yet specific way, three things will happen.

FIRST, WHEN YOU’RE THE TARGET: customers come out of nowhere.

Unexpected markets you never would have thought of start saying things like, “Your product is SO perfect for someone like me because…”

And you just sit there, smiling, taking mental notes!

Because they just did your market research for you.

SECOND, WHEN YOU’RE THE TARGET: you don’t have to waste your money.

Advertising, direct mail, brochures and all that other tree killing, money burning crap? Things of the past!

Now, you can focus your efforts on what’s most important: serving, respecting and retaining those customers that identified themselves FOR you.

THIRD, WHEN YOU’RE THE TARGET: customers are self-qualified.

Which reduces the cost of sales.
Which reduces your level of effort.
Which reduces your average sales cycle.

Which makes you a lot of money WITHOUT annoying, interrupting and disrespecting the people you serve.

THE BOTTOM LINE: when you match a My Culture with Reverse Target Marketing, you win. The customers win.

Because ultimately, in a My Culture, the customer is going to find her target eventually.

So, it only makes sense that you make your target as big possible, right?

Don’t aim; be aimed at.

Don’t be the arrow; be the bull’s-eye.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
How are you reversing your marketing?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Share your best Bulls-eye Basics here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Thursday, September 13, 2007

13 Steps to Entertaining an Idea

Ideas are your major source of income.

As such, you need to become a MASTER of entertaining those ideas.

Aristotle once said, “It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.”

Note the distinction.

He’s talking about being objective.

Being open. Brainstorming. Considering the possibility that an idea MIGHT be good.

Or, that it might suck.

You won’t know until you entertain it.


So, whether you're working on a new product, a new business or a new piece of writing, you need a system.

Here’s the Content Management System I’ve been using for years. Feel free to adapt it to your own creative process...

How to Entertain an Idea

1. Write it down
. Start a new blank document. Put your idea - or the key point of your idea - at the top of the page.

2. Save. Make this phrase your file name. Save it in a folder called “Ideas,” “Brainstorms” or “Modules.”

3. Start with a List
. Write a bullet-point list of everything you know, every question you have and every example you can think of that relates to your idea. Dump your brain until you have nothing left. (This could take five minutes or two hours.) Don’t worry about spelling, grammar or order. Order comes later.

4. Search. Spend a few minutes on Google. Find out what else has been thought, written and said about your idea. Check out blogs, articles, and Wikipedia for verification. Also, hop on Amazon to see if any books have been written specifically about your idea.

5. Gather. Take the facts, statistics, quotations and related information that support your idea and add it to your list. Still keep your document as a list. Don’t organize anything just yet.

6. Stop. Now would be a good time to take a five-minute break. Go work on something totally unrelated to your new idea. This will help you return to the task at hand with an objective perspective.

7. Organize. When you return to your idea, re-read your list. Edit, delete, add to and modify any points that need clarification. Trim the fat and only keep the best material that supports your idea.

8. Filter
. OK, now it’s time to bring ideas from one field of knowledge into another field of knowledge. Ask yourself the following Filtering Questions:

*How does this idea fit into my picture of the universe?
*What does this idea have to do with me?
*How does this idea relate to my expertise?

9. Stretch. Expand on specific points as they relate to your expertise. Think about past experiences that would be make good support material.

10. Organize. Break up the list into logical groups. Rearrange key ideas and points together.

11. Edit again.
Repeat your editing process.

12. Evaluate. Ask yourself if this is a good idea or not. Decide whether you want to move from “entertaining” to “accepting.” Solicit feedback when necessary.

And, the final step…

13. Leverage. Sell that idea for millions of dollars.

Good luck!

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
How do you entertain an idea?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Share your creative process here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Wednesday, September 12, 2007

On being unarguable

I was walking down the Las Vegas Strip one day when I saw the coolest t-shirt of all time.

A teenager was wearing it. The front was emblazoned with the New York Yankees logo.

Right above it in big, bold letters, it said: DO THE MATH.

It took me a second, but eventually I figured it out.

See, you can talk all you want about how much you hate the Yankees.

BUT THE BOTTOM LINE IS: if you really sit down and do the math, you’d realize that the Yankees are clearly one of the greatest organizations in sports history.

Which makes them unarguable.

Undisputed.
Undeniable.
Unquestionable.

And this doesn’t just apply to sports, either.

In business, your goal is to become unarguable.

With your IDEAS.
With your BRANDS.
With your RESULTS.
With your COMPANY.

See, when you’re unarguable, THREE things happen:

FIRST … you disarm customers of their preoccupations.
This leaves them nowhere to go except in your direction.

SECOND … you prove to customers that you have a track record of success.
This reinforces their confidence in working with or buying from you.

THREE … you remind yourself that haters, naysayers and other forms of resistance can say all they want, but nothing can take away the fact that YOU are successful.
This just makes you feel good!

Interestingly, the word “argue” comes from the Latin arguere, which means, “to make clear or demonstrate.”

So, that’s what’s so powerful about being UN-arguable.

The value is self-evident. No explanation needed.

Now, it’s also important to note another thing.

The New York Yankees originated in 1904.

But they didn’t win their first World Series title until 1923.

That’s almost two decades.

Two decades of NOT being the best.
Two decades of NOT being unarguable.

For The Yankees, it was two decades of paying dues.

See, being http://www.blogger.com/img/gl.link.gifunarguable isn’t something you just “decide” to become one afternoon.

Anyone or any company that wants to be referred to as unarguable must do a few things:

PAY their dues
That means sucking for a while in the beginning.
That means taking the time (and paying the price) to uncover your unique voice.

ENDURE the criticism
That means ignoring it if it comes from ignorant sources.
That means embracing it if it comes from validated sources.

OBSESS about it
That means projecting unquestionable commitment.
That means eliminating the words “finish line” from your vocabulary.

STICK it out.
That means choosing to do the brave thing by staying in the longer line.
That means having the patience to compound thousands of little activities.
That means becoming the best at what you do by not quitting while everyone else falls by the wayside.

Pay, endure, obsess and stick. That’s how you become unarguable.

OK, one final point.

Being unarguable isn’t for everyone.

Only the dedicated, committed, and (oftentimes) crazy individuals need apply.

However.

If it IS for you, and if you ARE willing to pay the price, here’s what you can expect:

People will still resist you…
People will still not like you…
People will still say whatever they want about you…

…but in the end, when they do the math, they’ll either:

1. Smile and embrace you, or
2. Curl up and realize they can’t do anything to you.

Because, like ‘em or not, you gotta respect the Yankees.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Are you unarguable?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Share your best example of someone (or something) that's unarguable!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Tuesday, September 11, 2007

13 signs that your idea probably isn’t that good

1. Your idea probably isn't that good ... If everybody loves it.

2. Your idea probably isn't that good ... If nobody wants to steal it.

3. Your idea probably isn't that good ... If you can easily duplicate it.

4. Your idea probably isn't that good ... If you don’t have them at hello.

5. Your idea probably isn't that good ... If you can’t explain it to a five year old.

6. Your idea probably isn't that good ... If it’s just an ECHO of someone else’s idea.

7. Your idea probably isn't that good ... If people can’t easily and quickly repeat it.

8. Your idea probably isn't that good ... If you can’t explain it in eight words or less.

9. Your idea probably isn't that good ... If you continuously get shot down at “Why?”

10. Your idea probably isn't that good ... If you have to try excessively hard to convince people.

11. Your idea probably isn't that good ... If you can’t convince a bank to lend you money.

12. Your idea probably isn't that good ... If you can’t write it down on the back of a business card.

13. Your idea probably isn't that good ... If you have to spend three weeks constantly explaining to someone why your idea is so cool, and they STILL don't "get" it.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What are the telltale signs of an idea that isn't that good?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Complete this sentence, "If _________________, then your idea probably isn't that good."

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Monday, September 10, 2007

How to (not) exist

If you can’t define your product … it doesn’t exist.
Because a confused mind never buys.

If you don’t have a unique product … it doesn’t exist.
Because a choice-saturated mind never buys.

If it doesn’t exist on the Internet … it doesn’t exist.
Not just a web-SITE; a web-PRESENCE. Octopus, not earthworm.

If you can’t Google it … it doesn’t exist.
What happens when someone googles your name?

If people aren’t talking about your product … it doesn’t exist.
It’s simple: get noticed = get remembered = get business. Who’s blogging about you?

If you’re not marketing your company DAILY … it doesn’t exist.
People who “do a little marketing here and there” will “get new customers … here and there.”

If you can’t describe your product eight words or less … it doesn’t exist.
Customers crave simplicity. Could you explain your idea to a kindergartner?

If you don’t write it down … it doesn’t exist.
Because if you don’t write it down, it never happened. That’s why writing is the basis of all wealth.

If people aren’t retelling your story … it doesn’t exist.
The only true reason your business will grow is if your existing customers are telling your potential customers about you. Word of mouth is the most honest, most sincere and most authentic form of marketing.

If you can’t be reached … you don't exist.
Even without Google, people still need to be able to contact you. So, if your phone numbers, addresses and emails are out of date, disconnected or no longer in service, you’ve got a problem. Because if they can’t get you, they’ll just pick the next guy on the list.

REMEMBER: anonymity is your greatest barrier to business success.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What causes someone (or something) to NOT exist?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Complete this sentence: If ____________, then you don't exist.

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Sunday, September 09, 2007

Insist on being yourself

I was once forbidden from entering into a dance club because I was wearing my nametag.

Another time I got kicked out of a fancy restaurant for wearing my nametag.

And a few years ago, I dated a girl who was so uncomfortable with my nametag that she stopped going out with me.

I know. Ridiculous.

But hey, that’s cool. Those are the types of people and places I wouldn’t want to associate with anyway.

LESSON LEARNED: insist on being yourself.

In The War of Art, Steven Pressfield says, “When we see people begin to live their authentic lives, it drives us crazy because we know we’re not living our own.”

Also, Nietzsche once said, “Those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music.”

Nice.

So, whether you're:

At work...
At school...
At home...

Don’t shrink from opportunities to say things like:

“That’s how I roll.”
“That’s my policy.”
“That’s just who I am.”
“That’s what I believe.
“That’s just how I dress.”
“That’s the way I do business.”

And next time someone becomes upset or frustrated or uncomfortable around you when you DO insist on being yourself, remember two things:

1. That probably says more about them than it does about you.
2. They’re just jealous.

Insist on being yourself.

And if some one (or some place) can’t handle it, just walk away.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Have you ever had to check your personality at the door?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Write "Insist on being yourself" on a sticky note and post it EVERYWHERE.

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Saturday, September 08, 2007

Be willing to suck in the beginning

I’ve been writing books since I was 21.

But, I didn’t find my true author’s voice until I was about 25.

It comes with the territory. Whether you’re a rock star, a artist or a business owner, you’ve got to "get the shanks out."

LESSON LEARNED: be willing to suck in the beginning.



Dare to do it badly.
Seek progress, not perfection.
Spend some time paying (or playing) your dues.
Invest some sweat in creating work that isn’t very good.

Because when you do, here’s what happens:

After a while, say a few years or so, you start to get good. You begin to discover your voice, your groove, your unique style, your “thing,” your sound, your approach.

And eventually, once all the shanks have been disposed of, you start to ROCK every time.

Not that you don’t mess up. Or make some junk here and there. Or create something that isn’t amazing. (Even U2 writes a weak song every once in a while.)

The point is:

Because you paid the price, you developed patience.

Because you developed patience, you got the shanks out.

And because you got the shanks out, you made room for the good stuff.

REMEMBER: your most valuable ideas, projects, notes and words are just DYING to come to the surface.

But sometimes, you might need to dig through a few layers of junk to find them.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Are you willing to suck in the beginning?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Go through a stack of old creative work and find something that was TERRIBLE. Post it on your bulletin board as a reminder.

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Friday, September 07, 2007

Make your mind your friend

1. Hang with it. Keep daily appointments with yourself. Clear it. Set aside time to just think. Encourage your mind to get better by doing creativity exercises.

2. Feed it. Read more books; watch less TV. Go for more walks. Exercise rhythmically for 30 minutes a day to flood it with endorphins and expand its idea-generating prowess. Have regular conversations with super-smart, creative people.

3. Listen to it. Figure out what it’s trying to tell you. Write every single day. Do Morning Pages. Listen to your intuition. When you get a bad feeling, act upon it.

4. Understand it. Learn how you learn. Learn how you think. Take several personality, learning style and action style assessments. Clarify your philosophies and policies.

5. Relax it. Meditate daily. Oxygen = Wonderful. Flood it with positive affirmations. Do breathing exercises. Take breaks every 50 minutes.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
How do you make your mind your friend?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Share your best techniques here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


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Thursday, September 06, 2007

2,500 days and counting...

Today is day 2,500!

Man, that's almost seven years.

Wow, what a ride it's been so far! Can't wait to see what the next 2,500 days brings!


Anyway, I've been saving this post for just the right occasion...

* * * *

Last night I asked my friend Maria, “What was the major contributor to your success?”

She told me that when she married a man from a different culture, a different religion and a different way of life, the hardest part was dealing with his in-laws.

“I emigrated from Mexico at the age of 28,” she explained. “And even though the language barrier was an obvious challenge, my in-laws were worse!”

Because they didn’t believe in her.

“You’ll never get a job here…”
“You won’t become successful…”
“You’ll only be able to make minimum wage…”

“So, that was exactly why I worked so hard,” Maria said. “To show to them. To prove them wrong. Because they didn’t believe in me.”

Wow.

You know, it’s interesting. If someone were to ask me what the major contributor to my success was, I would say, “Because EVERYBODY believed in me.”

I guess that’s the way belief works. Whether it’s for your or against you, it’s still the most powerful motivator in the universe.

To quote John Mayer, "Belief is a beautiful armor, but makes for the heaviest sword."

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Who believed in you first?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Call them right now and thank them.

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag


Are you a friend of The Nametag Network?

Read more blogs!
Rent Scott's Brain!
Download articles and ebooks!
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Make a name for yourself here...