Sunday, July 22, 2007

How pluggable are you?

I plugged your blog.
I plugged your book.
I plugged your show.
I plugged your website.
I plugged your product.
I plugged your company.
I plugged your new movie.
I plugged your new album.

Don’t you love it when someone says that to you?

It means you’re pluggable.

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word plug didn’t take on its “promotional” meaning until 1902.

Today it’s defined as “the informal, favorable and public mention of something.”

Interestingly, the word plug also comes from a verb meaning "to work energetically at.”

HERE'S THE BIG QUESTION: are people working energetically to favorably and publicly mention YOU?

Publicly, meaning online.
Publicly, meaning in person.
Publicly, meaning on the phone.
Publicly, meaning on the airwaves.

If your answer is "not enough," here’s a list of seven ways to become (more) pluggable:

PLUG PRINCIPLE 1: Start early.
Build remarkability into your products and services before they’re even released. When you create a baseline of coolness, plugging will come naturally.

PLUG PRINCIPLE 2: Make it easy.
Do you have a “Send this site to a friend!” box on your homepage? Are you using Digg, del.i.cious and other tagging software to enable people to plug you? I hope so, because people need shortcuts. And part of being pluggable is making it SUPER easy for people to tell their friends about you.

PLUG PRINCIPLE 3: Keep a record.
Every time someone plugs you, write it down in your Plug Log. Whether it’s a Google Alert, email, article, blog post or casual conversation, write-it-down. Keep track of your progress. Soon, you’ll hit a critical mass. And THAT’S when you'll notice a direct relationship between plugging and profits.

PLUG PRINCIPLE 4: Don’t ask.
Have you ever seen a businessperson’s email signature that read, “Please refer me to your friends and family!”?

If so, did you ever refer that person?

Probably not!

See, people aren’t going to plug you if you ASK them to plug you. Word of mouth is casual, unsolicited and authentic. The minute you try to force it, you lose it.

PLUG PRINCIPLE 5: Free is key.
Bestselling author Greg Godek once gave 200+ copies of his book 1001 Ways to be Romantic to every person waiting in line at the Tonight Show with Jay Leno. Later that night, Jay made a comment on air to millions of viewers! That’s one hell of a plug! What are you giving away for free? And are you giving it away to the right people?

PLUG PRINCIPLE 6: Be gracious.
Any time someone mentions you on her blog, writes about you in her column or holds up your book to a viewing audience of several million, thank her. Even if it’s as simple blog comment, instant message or email saying, “Thanks for the link love.” This gratitude makes you more receptive to attracting future blessings.

PLUG PRINCIPLE 7: Reciprocate.
He who plugs first GETS plugged back.

Who have you plugged this week?

REMEMBER: word of mouth is a beautiful thing. It’s the most effective, most honest, most inexpensive and most sincere form of marketing in the world.

And it’s a function of your ability to be pluggable.

LET ME ASK YA THIS…
Are people working energetically to favorably and publicly mention YOU?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Make a list of the last five things, people or companies you plugged. What characteristics did they all have in common?

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
That Guy with the Nametag
www.hellomynameisscott.com

Are you the luckiest person you know?

Watch Scott's interview on 20/20!

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