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Sunday, July 30, 2006

NametagTV: The Never Ending Nametag



LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Do you always come prepared?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Do not try this at home!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag


Do you want to be That Guy?

Find out how TOMORROW with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!

Tuesday, July 25, 2006

The World is a Mirror, Part 7

A is for ATTITUDE
B is for BREAK PATTERNS
C is for CONSISTENCY
D is for DISCIPLINE
E is for EVOLUTION
F is for FRIENDLINESS
G is for GOOD WITH NAMES

In his basic writings, Freud explains that a person's name is the single context of memory most apt to be forgotten. Guess Dale Carnegie forgot to mention that, huh?!

But we've all done it. We all do it. And we'll continue to do it, unless we take the right steps to avoid this barrier to approachability.

Now, even if you have blanked out on a person's name, and even if it happened at the worst possible moment, trust me, you don't know how bad it can get. See, when I forget someone's name, people act like it's the ultimate sin. The gravest social no-no in the world! Hey Scott, do you remember my name? Come on Mr. Nametag, this should be easy for you right? Right? Come on!

People love to test me. And sometimes, it's tough. After all, I speak to tens of thousands of people a year! I can't remember all of them! So, in the event that I do forget a name - which happens every once in a while - not only does it offend them (more so than if I were someone else) but it makes me look like a hypocrite!

Therein lies the problem: wearing a nametag is great to help other people remember my name; but it does me no good when I blank out on theirs. So, people just expect me to always remember their names, simply from a reciprocal standpoint; which, if you think about it, isn't really fair.

But, such is life. So, several years ago when I got tired of disappointing people when I forgot their names (even though I AM human), I made it a point to improve my name-remembering skills.

The first thing I did was change my attitude. I'd say to myself, "I am going to remember the name of everyone I meet today!" and "I am amazing at remembering names!"

Next, I read several books on the topic, the best of which was Remember Every Name Every Time.

Then I began learning why people forget names and writing articles on the subject. This was a great way to organize my thoughts and stay refreshed on effective techniques for remembering names.

But of course, reading and writing only got me so far. I had to start putting these ideas to work. For example, this week I spoke to an international student leadership group in Switzerland. 45 kids, 45 names, all of which were different. My goal was to memorize every one of their names by the second day. Here's how I did it:

Quizzing: any time I saw any of the students from a distance, I recited their name in my head five times before approaching them.

Vocalizing: any time I talked with one of the students, I verbally used their name at least one time during the conversation.

Refreshers: any time I had a break, I'd find my way over to the students' mailboxes. These were small envelopes on which their names were printed. I would peruse all 45 of the mailboxes while trying to picture the student in my mind.

Assistance: if I wasn't sure of someone's name, I'd ask one of the other staff members in private.

Reminders: if we sat in a circle, I'd take time at the beginning and end of the program to go around and say the person's name to myself while looking at their face.

If that sounds like a lot of work, you're right - it is! But it's worth it. And in six years, if there's one compliment I've received quite a lot, it's in reference to my name remembering abilities. And while I don't claim to remember every name every time, I will say that I'm pretty damn good.

Therefore, I give thanks to my nametag for FORCING me to develop this valuable skill. And I guess in end, if everyone knows my name, I may as well do whatever I can to remember theirs.

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
Do you remember the last time you forgot someone's name?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Study some name remembering techniques from this article. Try them out and see which ones work!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag


Do you want to be That Guy?

Find out how in 7 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!

Monday, July 24, 2006

The Great Place to Work Model

Seeing that I'm still in the middle of Swiss Nowhere, my wifi keeps going in and out. Better make this quick...

A fascinating study from Ohio State proved that customers whose clothes were rated as more fashionable and attractive, and who showed better grooming and make-up skills, received better service than those whose appearance was not rated as highly.

Also, I read a great piece in the Canadian Business Online about "The Great Place to Work Model. It was developed more than two decades ago in the U.S. and now used to survey some 750 companies in that country each year, has since been exported to 28 nations in Europe, Latin America and Asia. In 2005, 3,000 organizations around the globe completed the institute's 57-question culture survey.

The employee surveys have revealed a remarkable consistency in what makes a great workplace, despite a wide mix of industries represented and the size of companies eligible to participate. For example, employees at a company in the Top 10 in any given country agreed 85% of the time, on average, with the statement: "Management is approachable, easy to talk with."

Good stuff. Enjoy it. I'm off to the chocolate factory!

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
On a scale from 1-10, how approachable is your management?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Ask five people you work with how approachable your management is. Submit your results here!

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag


Do you want to be That Guy?

Find out how in 8 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!

Saturday, July 22, 2006

How to score a date with Miss Universe

Whew! I'm exhausted...

Just finished a full day of workshops with two different student leadership groups out here in Switzerland. The morning session was held in a 50+ year old auditorium with no electricity and some serious acoustical echoing. So I ditched the ol' PowerPoint, used the sun as my light, and just spoke really, really loudly, which actually ended up sounding way better than a microphone.

The highlight of the program HAD to be when Andrew, one of the staff members, stood up on his chair and sang an a capella version of A Whole New World from Aladdin. He claimed he'd never sung anything like that in front of such a small group before, and told us afterwards that he was "terrified."

However, Andrew received a standing ovation and clearly proved that leaders have to take risks if they want to make a name for themselves. Way to go man!

In the afternoon session, the electricity was back on. And as much as I would have enjoyed NOT using PowerPoint again, it sure was nice to see the look on 45 high school students' faces when I show them the picture of me @ Iron Age getting my nametag tattoo. Of course, they asked to see the tattoo in person. So I showed it to them after the speech, just to keep 'em in suspense.

We also experienced the mad freestylin' skills of Tarik, who dropped a minute's worth of lyrics on the spot. Well done!

But the best part about this program had to be an exercise called Different vs. Unique, in which each person says, "I'm probably the only person in this room who..."

We learned some amazing stuff, i.e., some students had traveled to Antarctica, swam with sharks, hated chocolate, even NEVER seen snow before! However, the most memorable item came from Jaime, who once went on a date with Miss Universe! Jaime, you stud you!

Well, my "work" is officially done. I now have five days in Switzerland to just chill. So, I'm off to the Alps.

See ya!

LET ME ASK YA THIS...
What's the difference between a "unique person" and a "different person"?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Brainstorm all the ways you could finish this sentence: "I'm probably the only person you'll ever meet who..."

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag


Do you want to be That Guy?

Find out how in 13 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!

Thursday, July 20, 2006

I somehow managed to get wifi in the middle of the Alps

This week I'm in Leysin, Switzerland (outside of Geneva) speaking at YPO's Junior Leadership University.

How I got this stinkin' wifi to work, I have no idea.

This is my second year here. It's absolutely breathtaking. Last night we watched the storm come in through the mountains, which made for one heck of a skyline!

Today I have two sessions with the students, both of which are called "Make a Name for Yourself." Should be awesome.

In other exciting news, my new website is finally live!

After months and months of hard work, with the help of Chad and CIO Services, this baby is up and running! Check it out here!



LET ME ASK YA THIS...
When was the last time you updated your website?

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
Take a few minutes and browse 10 of your competitors' websites. See if you're up to par. If not, call Wendy at CIO Services.

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag


Do you want to be That Guy?

Find out how in 14 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!

Tuesday, July 18, 2006

Meet Me! A surefire way to enable others to approach you

According to this article from the Rockford Register Star, MeetMe, a business dedicated to bringing singles together, uses the ever popular silicone bracelet worn by people who want to show they’re available and approachable.

MeetMe.bz (not a typo!) explains that the bracelet is a symbol that announces a person's availability and encourages people to approach him or her. Some wear them so they can meet people when they're out with friends. Others wear them to increase their chances of meeting someone while going about their busy daily routines. The MeetMe bracelet leaves no question that a person is looking to meet someone and facilitates the process of bringing people together.

Presently, there are 602 bracelets in circulation.

MY THOUGHTS:
  • I hope people don't expect to simply slap this bracelet on and wait for others to approach them! After all, approachability is a two way street: approach-EE and approach-ER.
  • I'd like to see the website post success stories of connections made from the bracelets. Kind of like Match.com features the couples that got married after meeting on their site.
  • Isn't our culture too saturated with these Lance Armstrong bracelets (there's one for EVERYTHING!) that it won't be as effective as it would have been, say, three years ago?

    LET ME ASK YA THIS...
    Would you wear one of these?

    LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
    What other visual tools could you use to inform people around you that you're available?

    * * * *
    Scott Ginsberg
    Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag


    Do you want to be That Guy?

    Find out how in 14 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

    Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!
  • Best workplaces in 29 nations share key similarities

    The April 10-23, 2006 issue of Canadian Business Magazine reported a FASCINATING study about the characteristics of effective workplaces.

    The Great Place to Work model, developed more than two decades ago in the U.S. and now used to survey some 750 companies in that country each year, has since been exported to 28 nations in Europe, Latin America and Asia. In 2005, 3,000 organizations around the globe completed the institute's 57-question culture survey.

    The employee surveys have revealed a remarkable consistency in what makes a great workplace, despite a wide mix of industries represented and the size of companies eligible to participate.

    For example, employees at a company in the Top 10 in any given country agreed 85% of the time, on average, with the statement:

    "Management is approachable, easy to talk with."


    * * * *

    This makes TOTAL sense, considering:

    a) I've only had one manager in my life who was easy to talk with
    b) That was the only workplace I didn't hate walking into everyday

    LET ME ASK YA THIS...
    What makes a manager easy to talk with?

    LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
    Ask 10 of your friends if their manager is approachable; easy to talk with. Report back to me with your statistics.

    * * * *
    Scott Ginsberg
    Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag


    Do you want to be That Guy?

    Find out how in 15 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

    Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!

    Monday, July 17, 2006

    Adventures in Nametagging: STAPLES Style

    That was easy. I spent last Friday in Boston speaking with my new friends @ STAPLES! Man, I was SO excited for this speech, as one of my favorite stories (that I've been telling for years to 1000's of people) involves an old lady asking me to help her find the envelopes in a STAPLES aisle. I, of course, helped her find what she needed; although I did not receive commission.

    We focused primarily on spreading word of mouth about That Guy inside (and outside) of an organization.

    I suggested keeping a "Cool Journal," in which you keep track of all things, people and events that are cool. If you'd like to try this idea, here's how it works: on the left side of the page, write the name of the thing/person which is cool. On the right side, write WHY it's cool, and what your response was, i.e., emailed all your friends, bought the product, etc. This exercise will help you gain an understanding of the properties of cool and enable you to increase you or your idea's present coolness.

    Now, since I'm a huge fan of the STAPLES Easy Button, and simply could not miss the opportunity to have a little fun with my favorite office supply chain, I closed my presentation with the following faux-advertisement. (Special thanks to Design Shark Studios for putting this comp together.)

    Think STAPLES needs a new spokesperson?

    LET ME ASK YA THIS...
    What's your favorite way to spread WOM about That Guy?

    LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
    Start your cool journal today! Email me your first five entries.

    * * * *
    Scott Ginsberg
    Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag


    Do you want to be That Guy?

    Find out how in 16 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

    Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!

    Friday, July 14, 2006

    The World is a Mirror, Part 6

    A is for ATTITUDE
    B is for BREAK PATTERNS
    C is for CONSISTENCY
    D is for DISCIPLINE
    E is for EVOLUTION
    F is for FRIENDLINESS

    Friendly always wins.

    Cheesy? Maybe. But it's true. It's not possible to go wrong with friendliness.

    It's also not possible to max out on friendliness. You can always increase it. And I only say that because after all these years of wearing a nametag to make other people friendlier, a major improvement I've noticed in my life is: I've actually become friendlier myself.

    I'm tellin ya, this stuff works. The moment you boost your friendliness is the moment you experience the follow payoffs:

    People are rarely mean to you.
    I've seen the meanest people in the world do complete 180's because of friendliness. This reminds me of Tim Sanders' book The Likability Factor. His research proves that you should never allow yourself to communicate unfriendliness as a first step because, as a social reflex, people will generally reciprocate your friendliness (or lack thereof).

    Your cool factor goes up.
    A Canadian University did a study on the link between friendliness and "coolness." They based their findings on a survey of 800 respondents -- mostly twentysomething university students -- who were asked to rate on a scale of one to seven -- one being uncool, and seven being very cool -- the coolness of 90 adjectives. They then asked the same respondents to rate the same 90 adjectives according to their social desirability. And what they found was a strong correlation between the two. In other words, the qualities that make one socially desirable -- being friendly, fair, thoughtful and kind -- were also what makes one cool -- at least in the minds of about 60 per cent of participants.

    Stress is reduced.
    Just like you, I've missed flights, lost luggage, received bad service, been cut off in traffic or been knocked into in the middle of a crowded bar. Now, because I'm human, my natural reaction is to get upset. But I don't. I always catch a glimpse of that little nametag in the corner of my eye before I yell, "Watch where you're going jerk," and I'm reminded to act friendly. In 2,080 days, I've rarely become SO pissed off to the point of yelling or complaining. Instead, I've learned to react patiently and, most importantly, friendly. It's never steered me wrong. And I'm sure it's reduced my overall stress level.

    The point is, even the nicest person in the world can still become friendlier. The benefits are scientifically based and 100% true.

    This stuff works. Friendly always wins.

    LET ME ASK YA THIS...
    In what area of your life could you be friendlier?

    LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
    Think of the friendliest person you know: are people mean to them? Are they cool? Are they stressed?

    * * * *
    Scott Ginsberg
    Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag


    Do you want to be That Guy?

    Find out how in 20 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

    Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!

    Thursday, July 13, 2006

    HELLO, my name is BE:99

    1. BE afraid only of standing still.
    2. BE regularly silly.
    3. BE three moves ahead of everyone.
    4. BE unexpected.
    5. BE your own definition of success.
    6. BE the first one.
    7. BE the only one.
    8. BE unforgettable.
    9. BE remarkable.
    10. BE ashes, not dust.
    11. BE a sleeper.
    12. BE so damn sure of yourself.
    13. BE ready for anything.
    14. BE the same wherever you go.
    15. BE visually accountable.
    16. BE the local ball of fire.
    17. BE easy to get a hold of.
    18. BE consistently consistent.
    19. BE the new guy’s first friend.
    20. BE completely original.
    21. BE a great conversationalist.
    22. BE an even greater listener.
    23. BE willing to say, “Wait, I don’t know what that means.”
    24. BE That Guy.
    25. BE THE guy.
    26. BE your own adjective.
    27. BE willing to ask ridiculous questions.
    28. BE open to making an idiot out of yourself.
    29. BE the brand.
    30. BE ubiquitous.
    31. BE in front of your fans regularly.
    32. BE transparent.
    33. BE thick skinned.
    34. BE heard from miles away.
    35. BE unique, not different.
    36. BE curious, not judgmental.
    37. BE approachable, don’t work the room.
    38. BE a sleeper.
    39. BE a people collector.
    40. BE a little crazy.
    41. BE not ashamed by your art.
    42. BE likable.
    43. BE someone your friends can call at 2 AM.
    44. BE the first one to show up.
    45. BE the last one to leave.
    46. BE really, really funny.
    47. BE the best at what you do.
    48. BE impossible to imitate.
    49. BE nicer to waiters.
    50. BE an engaging storyteller.
    51. BE available for Q & A.
    52. BE willing to find out what you suck at.
    53. BE up for anything.
    54. BE the only person smiling in traffic.
    55. BE Googleable.
    56. BE grounded.
    57. BE ballsy.
    58. BE cool.
    59. BE up on the news.
    60. BE a person OF character, not just a character.
    61. BE a class act.
    62. BE blatantly honest.
    63. BE less predictable.
    64. BE the greatest.
    65. BE the shit.
    66. BE the man.
    67. BE partial to the faces of the wicked.
    68. BE better than you used to be.
    69. BE tired of complainers.
    70. BE the only person singing.
    71. BE nicer to the ducks.
    72. BE like Bezos.
    73. BE a master of something.
    74. BE disgusted by smokers.
    75. BE sorry less.
    76. BE hard to sell.
    77. BE beautiful daily.
    78. BE better in concert.
    79. BE back and on the attack.
    80. BE a stickler for grammar.
    81. BE alone daily.
    82. BE the center of attention.
    83. BE more patient at the airport.
    84. BE slightly famous.
    85. BE a sweetheart.
    86. BE a better customer.
    87. BE part of something cool.
    88. BE a heartbreaker once.
    89. BE crushed by a heartbreaker twice.
    90. BE somebody’s mentor.
    91. BE nobody’s bitch.
    92. BE less bored.
    93. BE quotable.
    94. BE like that – FINE.
    95. BE better at small talk.
    96. BE radiantly healthy.
    97. BE partial to redheads.
    98. BE ten again.
    99. BE brave or go home.

    LET ME ASK YA THIS...
    Which of these BE99's are most relevant to you?

    LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
    Make your own BE:99, BE:25 or BE:50. Have fun. Get creative. BE whatever you want. Post it here!

    * * * *
    Scott Ginsberg
    Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag


    Do you want to be That Guy?

    Find out how in 20 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

    Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!

    Wednesday, July 12, 2006

    Overcoming fear of failure

    Curt's latest topic at Collective Genius is overcoming fear of failure. I posted with several answers to his key questions. Enjoy!

    What advice would you give to someone who is stuck because a fear of failing / being wrong / looking stupid is keeping them from taking action?

    If you think something is going to make you look stupid - at least temporarily with no long term repercussions for you or for others – I say do it. It's good for you. That's how you learn. Heck, I've looked stupid thousands of times in my life, and I'm better, stronger and wiser because of it. Looking stupid allows me NOT to take myself, my life and my business so darn seriously. It keeps me real. Keeps me in check. And I think that as long as you don't make the same mistake twice, you're all good.

    What techniques do you use to help move past that fear?

    I once made a list of 50 of the stupidest things I ever did and what I learned from them. Once I read the list back to myself, I thought, "Man, maybe it's not so bad after all!" This is a great exercise that I recommend to everyone.

    How has that fear kept you stuck in the past? How did you move past it?

    I once had a fear of watching myself speak on video. I had footage from speeches that I didn't watch for almost a year! But I found that when I did watch it, I realized, "Hmm...I'm actually a pretty good speaker!" I suppose the way I moved past it was to just bite the bullet and say to myself, "Alright, this is the only way I'm going to get better. Besides, there's nobody else in the room watching this, so who cares anyway?"

    What effect does perfectionism have on that fear? What are some ideas for countering it?

    I live by the adage, "Success is not perfection." In fact, one of my books has 6 typos in it! But I found a way to use those mistakes as marketing tools, in addition to symbolizing my humanness to my readers and audience members.

    What ideas do you have to help people learn from failure?

    "If you're not failing, you're not trying." That's a great quote I live by. Not sure who said it, but I try to fail at one thing a month. I keep a list of my failures and go back to it every once in a while to learn. Also, if I feel like everything's been going perfectly, I pray for a failure. Seriously. I welcome screw ups into my life and give thanks for every one of them.

    What are some alternate perspectives on failing / being wrong / looking stupid?

    In the song "Lose Yourself," Eminem says, "Success is my only mother-f***ing option, failure's not."

    Great lyric!

    LET ME ASK YA THIS...
    What's your philosophy on failure?

    LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
    Make a list called My Top Ten Business Failures and What I Learned From Them. Email it to me and I'll include your list on a future post!

    * * * *
    Scott Ginsberg
    Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag


    Do you want to be That Guy?

    Find out how in 21 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

    Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!

    Tuesday, July 11, 2006

    Taple Topics: How to Get Everyone Talking!

    Toastmasters, meet Uncommon Goods.

    They believe that creativity and the expression of individuality represent two great human treasures. They recognize that people want ways to express their individuality and creativity when shopping for themselves and others.

    Which is why they sell cool stuff like this...

    Table Topics boxes are clear acrylic "ice cubes" that hold a stack of 138 conversation starters that will get your guests thinking and eager to talk.

    They were created by Cristy Clarke who wanted to have genuine, compelling conversations at her cocktail parties. These colorful cubes let you snappily circulate the question at hand in the cube or pass cards out individually. Every box is peppered with questions ranging from the serious to the silly, for friends, families and teens.

    Awesome. I might buy a set. Thanks to Head Shark for the link.

    LET ME ASK YA THIS...
    What's your favorite get-together game?

    LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
    Next time you have a party or host a networking event, provide nametags for everyone. Then, encourage guests to also write their favorite cereal, book or biggest business challenge underneath their name. Undoubtly, networking and conversation will blossom! Take pictures, write down the stories and email them to me. I'll post them on the blog.

    * * * *
    Scott Ginsberg
    Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag


    Do you want to be That Guy?

    Find out how in 22 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

    Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!

    Monday, July 10, 2006

    Adventures in Nametagging: Charlotte Style

    Except for the enormous amounts of cigarette smoke that engulfed the city like a cloud (echh) Charlotte was awesome! As you look at this picture, you're probably wondering: who are all those people sitting with THE Ryan Cameron?

    That's Jessica McDougall, Jeffrey Gitomer and yours truly.

    We had a blast all weekend. I can't remember the last time I laughed so hard! Especially during our brief Miss Pac-Man Tourney, in which I schooled Gitomer and McDougall like the video prodigy that I am.

    We also spent (probably too much) time checking out The Kid From Brooklyn, which might be my new favorite website.

    I only have one thing to say: HEY STARBUCKS!!

    The highlight of the weekend had to be watching the US Open of Table Tennis. Ryan and I stopped by the convention center to check out the festivities. And I have to say, it might have been one of the Top Ten Coolest Things I've Ever Done In My Life. When we checked in, they gave us our tournament badges - although I think they were the wrong ones!

    We suited up in typical USTTA gear, hoping to fit right in with the crowd. Look closely and check out my paddle. (Excuse me, racquet.) Anyway, we donned our spiffy new badges and walked around the tournament area. Several kids approached us and kept asking us questions about the Ping Pong Robot, which was also extremely cool.

    Then we had a seat at center court. I whipped out my camera to snap this picture. And as the flash went off, the entire match froze and everyone looked over at us. "NO FLASHES PLEASE!" yelled the judge. Then, 2006 US Open World Champion Alexander "Cheese Sandwich" Karakosovitch stared me down with his intense, Russian daggers. Gasp! I almost wet myself!

    Finally, seeing as how Ryan was from Canada, we decided to have the North American Showdown to settle the argument once and for all: who is better at table tennis - Canada or US?

    It was a long, painful match. Screams and grunts could be heard from afar.


    Halfway through the match, I had to take a time out to regroup and replenish my fluids. After all, table tennis can be a violent, non-stop action sport.

    I will say, however, that the US was victorious 2-0 against Canada. (Go America!)


    All in all, the weekend was full of classic, one-of-a-kind experiences. Special thanks to all my new friends at BuyGitomer and TrainOne for making me laugh so hard. You guys ROCK!

    LET ME ASK YA THIS...

    What's the best sporting event you've ever attended?

    * * * *
    Scott Ginsberg
    Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag

    Do you want to be That Guy?

    Find out how in 23 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

    Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!

    Friday, July 07, 2006

    Adventures in Nametagging - Gitomer Style

    I'm in Charlotte this weekend hanging out with my buddy Jeffrey Gitomer, along with the WAY cool staff at BuyGitomer and TrainOne.

    We're just hanging out, brainstorming, sharing book ideas and having a blast. These guys are the best in the biz. It's truly an honor to watch how the REAL pros do it, and do it right. I've only been here one day and already I'm learning a ton!

    Also, great little story for ya. On the plane ride out here, I found an old copy of Reader's Digest from March 2004. There was a quip about marketing that was SO classic, (and SO appropriate, considering last week's podcast, Marketing & Dating Are The Exact Same Thing), that I just had to rip it out of the magazine so I could share it with ya:

    MARKETING FOR BEGINNERS
  • You see a gorgeous girl at a party and you say to her, "Hi, I'm very rich. Marry me!" That's Direct Marketing.
  • You see a gorgeous girl at a party and you get her telephone number. The next day you call her and say, "I'm very rich. Marry me." That's Telemarketing.
  • You see a gorgeous girl at a party. She walks up to you and says, "You're very rich." That's Brand Recognition.
  • You see a gorgeous girl at a party and say to her, "I'm rich. Marry me." She slaps you in the face. That's Customer Feedback.

    Once again, I stand by my theory: marketing and dating are the exact same thing.

    LET ME ASK YA THIS...

    Finish this sentence: marketing is just like ____________.

    * * * *
    Scott Ginsberg
    Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag

    Do you want to be That Guy?

    Find out how in 25 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

    Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!
  • Thursday, July 06, 2006

    The World is a Mirror, Part 5

    A is for ATTITUDE
    B is for BREAK PATTERNS
    C is for CONSISTENCY
    D is for DISCIPLINE
    E is for EVOLUTION

    Sometimes I still can’t believe it. How wearing a little nametag for one day evolved into all of this.

    Well, ok. I do believe it. I guess if I didn’t believe, none of this would have happened. But still, some days I just look at my nametag in the mirror, start laughing and think, “Man! This is crazy!”

    But that’s the beautiful thing about an idea: its evolution. And I think the moment you come up with your own great idea is the moment you also begin to develop a greater appreciation for idea evolution as a whole; hence the title of this essay series.

    GREAT EXAMPLE: A few months ago I watched a documentary about the making of Fraggle Rock, one of my favorite childhood TV shows. In this special DVD edition, Jim Henson narrated a behind-the-scenes look at the making of his beloved children’s program.

    All throughout the documentary, Henson kept making references to a small insert that came with the DVD box. I eventually grabbed the case and found a small booklet labeled, “Jim Henson’s Sketchbook.”

    I opened it and saw dozens of scribblings; original drawings and blueprint ideas from Jim Henson’s vision for an underground colony of joyful creatures called “Fraggles,” who loved to sing and dance. He even made a little note that “these creatures would bring peace and joy to children around the world.”

    Sooooo cool. Actual brainstorms from one of one the world’s most creative minds! I devoured the sketchbook all night.

    Stuff like that is fascinating to me. I guess I just like ideas. I like to marvel at the way they evolve from nothing to something. In fact, one of the many definitions of creativity is “to make something out of nothing.” And I think that’s a great way for people to learn: to follow the path of an idea from the cradle to the grave.

    Speaking of, I recently stumbled across my original “Nametag Notebook” from my junior year of college. I couldn’t believe I’d forgotten all about it! And although it wasn’t as interesting or valuable as Jim Henson’s sketchbook, last month I took some time to read through it...

    I plopped down in a comfortable chair (Carmel Apple Cider in hand) and took a trip down Memory Lane. Er, wait, maybe it was Nametag Manor. Whatever. It was a road. Anyway, here’s what I found.

    During that first year of nametagging, I jotted down observations of group reactions to wearing a nametag, individual stories and encounters, comments made about my nametag, even the names of new friends I made while wearing the nametag! The pages oozed with experiences and encounters with strangers and friends alike. I even sketched out a diagram of the chest placement of my nametag to prove that left vs. right didn’t matter; and that vertical placement was more important.

    And check this out. The most interesting entry of all was towards the back. I found a near-blank page with the following note written in large, block letters in the center:

    REMEMBER TO RESEARCH THIS WORD: “APPROACHABILITY”

    It was dated April 25, 2001.

    Before I started writing books on the word.
    Before I started giving speeches on the word.
    Before I built a business around the word!

    Sooooo cool.

    That’s evolution: the growth, expansion, development, progress and transformation that makes something out of nothing. It’s a beautiful thing.

    I encourage you to take some time today to think about one of the coolest, most successful ideas you ever had. For work, for life, for anything! Consider its origins. Ponder its evolution. See how far it’s come.

    You'll probably end up marveling to yourself, “Man! This is crazy!”

    LET ME ASK YA THIS...

    What's your favorite idea evolution example?

    * * * *
    Scott Ginsberg
    Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag

    Do you want to be That Guy?

    Find out how in 26 days with the release of Scott's forthcoming third book!

    Check out www.hellomynameisscott.com for all the juicy details!

    Wednesday, July 05, 2006

    How to create an approachable atmosphere at your next association meeting

    One of the privileges of working with ASAE was contributing to their national publication, Associations Now.

    Before my speech in May, the editor and I got together to talk about how organizations and associations could foster approachability among members and guests.

    The piece came out great, even if they did use a picture from when I was 22! (Click on the image to view a larger size.)




    Also, sorry it took so long to get it up here. Here's page two with all the "meat" of the article. We included lots of use-tomorrow tips for your organization, applicable ideas, do's and dont's of approachability, and of course, a nice pic of the ol' nametag tattoo to reinforce the value of commitment.

    LET ME ASK YA THIS...

    What's the best way to encourage approachability during an association meeting?

    * * * *
    Scott Ginsberg
    Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag
    www.hellomynameisscott.com

    Monday, July 03, 2006

    How my nametag almost got me kicked out of a wedding

    First of all, I didn't know it was a black tie wedding. I guess those things happen when you don't read the invitation carefully. Or at all. Woops.

    Secondly, I arrived 2 hours late. (Thanks a lot, alarm clock that never went off at the Best Western Garden Inn in Santa Rosa, CA.)

    Anyway, when I arrived I noticed that all the men were wearing tuxes. Damn it. Hope nobody minds that I'm wearing a measly old suit!

    And I really didn't think anyone would care. But ever since Wedding Crashers came out, I suppose families are on the look-out for inconsistent guests who don't seem to fit in.

    (That's me!)

    So, I think it was the late arrival plus the suit/nametag combination that did it.

    After the service, I strolled around the reception area. I felt a tug on my left shoulder. With my mouth stuffed full of mini pizzas, I turned to an intimidating man in his mid-fifties wearing a beautiful black tux and a big scowl on his face.

    "Excuse me, sir, but do you know this is a private party?"

    I swallowed quickly. "Um, yeah...?"

    "So, were you actually invited to this wedding?" he probed.

    Who is this guy? What the heck is he talking about?!

    "Well, I've known the groom for like, 17 years," I defended.

    He glanced down at my nametag as a smile slowly replaced his angry stare.

    "Oh wait, yeah! I know you. You're Scott Ginsberg, The Nametag Guy! Gosh I'm so sorry about that. Please forgive me...

    ...I'm the father of the bride."

    LET ME ASK YA THIS...

    Have you ever seen a real Wedding Crasher?

    * * * *
    Scott Ginsberg
    Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag
    www.hellomynameisscott.com