Wednesday, August 30, 2006

The Attitude of Approachability

Last week I finished reading What To Say When You Talk To Yourself.

Fantastic book. I can't believe I didn't read it five years ago. And it got me thinking...

...that a nametag would be utterly useless without a great attitude to go with it.

And since I always seem to get questions about attitude, I wanted to share a collection of positive, attitude building affirmations to help you self-talk your way to increased approachability.

(If you feel dumb reading these to yourself every day, don't worry. I've been doing it for years and sometimes I still feel dumb! But it works.)

• I am an approachable professional. I can both approach – and be approached by – important people.

• I choose to maintain an approachable attitude. I believe that every encounter is one in which I can learn, help others and expand my references, networks and experiences.

• I feel relaxed. When I engage with customers, coworkers and friends, they are put at ease and feel comfortable when working with me.

• I am confident. When I walk into a room, my smile, body language and appearance project happiness, enthusiasm and joy. I’m sure that wherever I go, I will meet new, cool people; I will learn new, cool stuff; and others will be glad they encountered me.

• I am a great conversationalist. I ask intriguing, creative, thought provoking questions that give people permission to open up. I am skilled at started, sustaining, transitioning and exiting conversations with individuals and groups.

• I am an even greater listener. I listen twice as much as I talk and make myself personally and physically available to others. I’m curious, not judgmental; and people known they can come to me with their ideas, problems, or anything else.

• I choose to be easily accessible. People can get a hold of me without frustration.

• I am attractive. Customers and coworkers are magnetized to me because of my superior attitude, ability to make them smile and willingness to assure that they feel comfortable.

• Shyness is not a problem for me. No matter what my friends, parents, teachers or the media say, I can easily and comfortably engage with others over the phone, via email or in person without apprehension.

• I have learned to recognize that fear is outweighed by benefit. Although stepping out of my comfort zone might be tough at first, it’s always worth it in the end. And even if I look like an idiot; I know that it’s no big deal, and that I’m better because of it.

• I win small victories first. In order to develop greater communication confidence, I achieve success in smaller situations first. Then, when I’m faced with something bigger and harder, it is this confidence I draw upon to face these new challenges with enthusiasm and readiness.

LET ME SUGGEST THIS...
I challenge you to read these to yourself every morning for a month. Just try it. See what happens. Email me when you’re done to let me know how your attitude has changed.

* * * *
Scott Ginsberg
Author/Speaker/That Guy with the Nametag

Are you That Guy?

Find out in Scott's latest book at www.hellomynameisscott.com!